Q&A with Lily Geismer, author of Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party

Recently Princeton University Press had the opportunity to interview Lily Geismer about her book, Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party. Read the introduction for free, here.

Why did you write this book?

LG: The answer to that question changed the longer I worked on the project. I set out to add to and complicate the literature of political and urban history. However, the longer I worked on it I realized that my other goal has been to make readers, especially people who engage in knowledge-based work and who live in suburbs, develop a more comprehensive understanding of the role of policies in shaping their lives and choices. Hopefully, it will help all readers think more critically about their political outlook and decisions.

What inspired you to get into your field?

LG: I was always really interested in contemporary politics and policy and questions of inequality in the United States. I realized as an undergraduate that the best way to explore these contemporary questions came from studying recent American history. When I entered graduate school, I did not intend to study these issues in one particular place or at the local level. However, it became clear that my questions about national political realignment, racial inequality, economic restructuring and the contradictions and transformation of American liberalism were best suited to a study of one particular place and picked to focus on Boston where I am from. The more I worked on the project, I came to understand that many of my questions were unconsciously informed by my experience growing up in Boston and were issues that had interested me since I was a kid and thus were what had pushed me toward the study of history in the first place.

What was the best piece of advice you ever received?

LG: The best piece of advice I received while I was writing the book came from Thomas Sugrue who told me to write the book as if the audience was my undergraduate students at the Claremont Colleges and I had to explain the concepts to them. This advice really helped me figure out to make the writing clearer and more accessible. The other advice that proved very influential came from the Author’s note at the beginning of by J. Anthony Lukas’s Common Ground about the three families he followed through the Boston busing crisis. Lukas explained, “At first, I thought I read clear moral geographies of their intersecting lives, but the more time I spent with them, the harder it became to assign easy labels of guilt or virtue. The realities of urban America when seen through the lives of actual city dwellers, proved far more complicated than I had imagined.” I found myself returning to this statement repeatedly as I sought to make sense of the politics and point of view of the suburban residents I study.

How did you come up with the title or jacket?

LG: The title for the book is a variation on the famous bumper sticker declaring “Don’t Blame Me, I’m from Massachusetts,” which circulated after George McGovern won only the state of Massachusetts in the 1972 election against Richard Nixon and again around Watergate. I thought it provided a way to capture and explore the dimensions of individualist and exceptionalist attitudes of many people who live in Massachusetts. It also provided a point of departure for me to provide a new examination of the McGovern campaign and show how it was not the failure it is often depicted to be, but a precursor to types of campaigns Democratic candidates would increasingly come to run on in an effort to appeal to suburban knowledge workers.

The design for the book jacket is inspired by a highway sign from Route 128, the high-tech corridor outside of Boston on which the book focuses. I am indebted to the wonderful and creative jacket designer Chris Ferrante at Princeton University Press for the cover design, which far exceeded my expectations. I know that you are not supposed to judge a book by the cover, but, in this case, I hope people will!

What is your next project?

LG: My next project grew out of Don’t Blame Us, especially the final chapter on Michael Dukakis and the Democratic Party’s pursuit of public-private partnerships and high-tech growth and I wanted to look at these questions more at the national level and into the 1990s. Although still at the very early stages, my new project examines the bi-partisan promotion of market-based solutions to problems of social inequality and privatization of public policy from the Great Society to the Clinton Foundation. I am focusing on the network that emerged as individuals and ideas have increasingly moved between government, academia, and business and how this movement connected and contributed to the economic, health care, education, environmental, housing and urban policies that emerged in the Clinton administration as well the development of public-private, non-profit programs like Teach for America; the popularity of microfinance, both in foreign and domestic contexts; and, the decision of college graduates across the political spectrum to seek employment in the private sector and non-government organizations. The project aims to complicate and challenge prevailing ideas about neoliberalism and show how the Democratic Party and its allies both embody and have influenced the pervasiveness of individualist and entrepreneurial-focused ideology in American policy, culture, and society.

What are you reading right now?

LG: One of the best parts of the book’s release has been that it coincided with the publication of books of members of my graduate school cohort and friends in the field, many of which were also published by Princeton University Press. I just finished Andrew Needham’s Power Lines: Phoenix and the Making of the Modern Southwest (Princeton, 2014) and Nathan Connolly’s A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida (Chicago, 2014). Next up are Leah Wright Rigueur’s The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power (Princeton, 2015) and Kathryn Brownell’s Showbiz Politics: Hollywood in American Political Life (North Carolina, 2014). I have been hearing about these projects for years and it has been so exciting to read them in their finished form.


 

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Don’t Blame Us:
Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party

Lily Geismer

A Fairy Tale Romance – Aschenputtel/Cinderella

The Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm have captivated readers for hundreds of years, inspiring numerous television, film, and theme park replications. Most recently is the live-action film Cinderella, scheduled for release on March 13.

In 1812, the Brothers Grimm wrote a tale that had been passed around through different cultures for centuries, Aschenputtel (Cinderella). Many people are surprised to find out that the romantic Disney version of the classic tale is not the whole story. The premise of both tales is the same: finding true love changed Cinderella and the Prince’s life. But some of the most notable differences between the Brothers Grimm tale and Disney’s adaption are not as romantic:

  • There is no fairy Godmother. Instead, Cinderella receives her attire from a wishing tree.
  • The Prince hosts three balls to find his future bride.
  • The Prince tried to capture the runaway Cinderella by putting black pitch on the stairs.
  • The evil stepmother demanded her daughters to squeeze their foot into the shoe, even if that meant cutting pieces of their feet off.

To view a complete collection of the Brothers Grimm stories and compare them to the Disney version, check out The Complete First Edition of the Original Folk & Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm translated and edited by Jack Zipes.

Stay tuned for a giveaway of The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm by following Princeton University Press on Twitter and Facebook.


 

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The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm:
The Complete First Edition

Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, Translated and edited by Jack Zipes

Interview with Adam Levine, author of American Insecurity on MSNBC.com

Adam Levine talked with MSNBC co-host Krystall Ball on her popular vodcast Krystal Clear about his new book, American Insecurity: Why Our Economic Fears Lead to Political Inaction. Check out the first chapter of American Insecurity for free, here.


 

bookjacket American Insecurity:
Why Our Economic Fears Lead to Political Inaction

Adam Seth Levine

#NewBooks released February 9, 2015

bookjacket Eating People Is Wrong, and Other Essays on Famine, Its Past, and Its Future
Cormac Ó Gráda“Cormac Ó Gráda has written a beautiful book about a painful and difficult subject, famines. In these five essays, he shows how combining the skills and common sense of the economist with the subtlety and sensitivity of the historian can produce fascinating and deep insights into a topic that few people today think about but that historians and observers of the developing world cannot ignore.” –Joel Mokyr, Northwestern University

 

 

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Making War at Fort Hood:
Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community

Kenneth T. MacLeish

“MacLeish writes eloquently….[T]his portrait of Army life on American turf is a welcome change of pace from the recent surge of battle-focused narratives.” –Publishers Weekly

 

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The Medea Hypothesis:
Is Life on Earth Ultimately Self-Destructive?

Peter Ward

“Ward holds the Gaia Hypothesis, and the thinking behind it, responsible for encouraging a set of fairy-tale assumptions about the eart, and he’d like his new book, due out this spring, to help uncture them. He hopes not only to shake the philosophical underpinnings of environmentalism, but to reshape our understanding of our relationship with nature, and of life’s ultimate sustainability on this planet and beyond.” –Drake Bennett, Boston Globe

 

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No Joke:
Making Jewish Humo
r
Ruth R. Wisse

“[S]ubtle and provocative…” –Anthony Gottlieb, New York Times Book Review

 

bookjacket One Day in the Life of the English Language:
A Microcosmic Usage Handbook

Frank L. Cioffi

One Day in the Life of the English Language is a welcome departure from the vast majority of grammar handbooks. Cioffi suggests that instead of memorizing tons of rules about sentence structure, students should internalize how sentences work–and with the motivation he gives, students have the incentive to want to write well. I truly love this book.” –Elizabethada A. Wright, University of Minnesota

 

bookjacket Partial Differential Equations:
An Introduction to Theory and Applications

Michael Shearer & Rachel Levy

“The writing style of this book is accessible, clear, and student friendly. It is approachable, with plenty of motivation for new students, and integrates nonlinear PDEs throughout. Shearer and Levy are familiar with contemporary research in applied PDEs and have made an excellent section of topics to introduce the field.” –John K. Hunter, University of California, Davis

 

bookjacket A Pocket Guide to Sharks of the World
David A. Ebert, Sarah Fowler & Marc Dando

 

 

Interview with Amin Ghaziani, author of There Goes the Gayborhood?

Amin Ghaziani was interviewed by Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies about his book, There Goes the Gayborhood? Read the interview, here.

Check out the introduction to Amin Ghaziani’s book, here.


 

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There Goes the Gayborhood?
Amin Ghaziani

2015 Black History Month Reading List

We are about halfway into the month of February and well into the celebration of Black History Month. Each year, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History chooses a commemorative theme, and this year’s is “A Century of Black Life, History, and Culture.” To learn more, click, here. In recognition of Black History Month, we’ve curated a must-read book list. Several of our titles have been receiving attention in the press of late, including in this Atlantic piece by Theodore R. Johnson on Leah Wright Rigueur’s new book, The Loneliness of the Black Republican, and in this feature in Raw Story (via The Guardian) on F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover’s Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature.  You can check out the first chapter of each book in our reading list linked below.

 

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F.B. Eyes:
How J. Edgar Hoover’s Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature

William J. Maxwell

 

bookjacket The Hero’s Fight:
African Americans in West Baltimore and the Shadow of the State

Patricia Fernández-Kelly

 

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Caught:
The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics

Marie Gottschalk

 

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Sea of Storms:
A History of Hurricanes in the Greater Caribbean from Columbus to Katrina

Stuart B. Schwartz

 

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The Loneliness of the Black Republican:
Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power

Leah Wright Rigueur

 

“Best of 2014″ Booklists

2014 was a great year at Princeton University Press; we have had an overwhelming number of books featured on booklists. Through the efforts of the publicity and marketing & sales departments, the Press has complied “Best of 2014” Booklists.

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
Irrational Exuberance: Revised and Expanded Third edition by Robert J. Shiller
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Locus of Authority: The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education by William G. Bowen & Eugene M. Tobin
On Bullshit by Harry Frankfurt
Mastering ’Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke
Mathematics without Apologies: Portrait of a Problematic Vocation by Michael Harris
The Age of the Vikings by Anders Winroth
How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method by G. Polya

2015 PROSE Awards

The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced the (39th annual) 2015 PROSE Award Winners on February 5th at the PSP Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. According to the PROSE press release, the 2015 PROSE Awards received a record-breaking 540 entries of books, reference works, journals, and electronic products in more than 50 categories.

Princeton University Press won top awards in 7 Book Subject Categories, and received 13 Honorable Mention awards – a total of 20 awards. This is a record for PUP, as we won more PROSE awards than any other publisher this year. For the full list of 2015 PROSE Award winners click, here. The official press release can be found, here.

7 Category Award Winners
Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek - Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Biomedicine & Neuroscience, Association of American Publishers

Charles W. Calomiris and Stephen H. Haber – Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

Jonathan Israel – Revolutionary Ideas: An Intellectual History of the French Revolution from The Rights of Man to Robespierre
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in European & World History, Association of American Publishers

Tim Birkhead, Jo Wimpenny and Bob Montgomerie – Ten Thousand Birds: Ornithology since Darwin
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in History of Science, Medicine & Technology, Association of American Publishers

Gil Nelson, Christopher J. Earle and Richard Spellenberg – Trees of Eastern North America
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Outstanding Work by a Trade Publisher, Association of American Publishers

Thomas W. Cronin, Sonke Johnsen, N. Justin Marshall and Eric J. Warrant – Visual Ecology
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Textbook/Biological & Life Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Mukesh Eswaran – Why Gender Matters in Economics
Winner of the 2015 PROSE Award in Textbook/Social Sciences, Association of American Publishers

 

13 Honorable Mention Winners

Eric H. Cline - 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Archeology & Anthropology, Association of American Publishers

Peter R. Grant and B. Rosemary Grant- 40 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Finches on Daphne Major Island
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Eswar S. Prasad – The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened Its Grip on Global Finance
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

Gregory Clark – The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers

Anders Winroth, The Age of the Vikings
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in European & World History, Association of American Publishers

Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern, The Golden Age Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in European & World History, Association of American Publishers

Edmund Fawcett – Liberalism: The Life of an Idea
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

Peter H. Schuck – Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

James Turner – Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Language & Linguistics, Association of American Publishers

Peter Baldwin - The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Law & Legal Studies, Association of American Publishers

David Edmonds – Would You Kill the Fat Man? The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Philosophy, Association of American Publishers

Eli Maor and Eugen Jost – Beautiful Geometry
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Popular Science & Popular Mathematics, Association of American Publishers

Moshe Halbertal – Maimonides: Life and Thought
Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Theology & Religious Studies, Association of American Publishers

 

Congratulations to the winners of the 2015 PROSE Awards!

Q&A with Robyn Muncy, author of Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America

Princeton University Press sits down with Robyn Muncy, author of Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America, to talk about how the book was created.

 

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Why did you write Relentless Reformer?

RM: I wrote the biography of Josephine Roche because from the moment I first encountered her, she knocked my historical socks off. She was at every turn doing things that flew in the face of historians’ expectations. She was a vice cop in the 1910s, a pro-labor coal mine owner in the 1920s, a gubernatorial candidate in the early 1930s, and Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Treasury in the New Deal government. As the second-highest ranking woman in Franklin Roosevelt’s administration, she started the conversation that Americans are still having about the federal role in health care. This was a woman to be reckoned with—and yet historians knew virtually nothing of her. Having “discovered” her, I had to tell her story.

As it turned out, Roche’s life also illuminated many of the grand themes of twentieth-century U.S. history. She helps us understand how women could have taken great strides toward equality with men and yet remained unequal. She helps us understand how, during the post-World War II era, Americans achieved the greatest level of economic equality in all of U.S. history. She helps us understand the values, perspectives, hopes, and dreams that connected the early twentieth century with the 1960s. Not bad for a single life.

Describe your writing process.

RM: My writing process is chaotic and inefficient, jubilant and suspenseful. The reason is that I figure out what I think about an issue or event through the writing process itself. I envy writers who can order their thoughts and complete their analyses before putting a metaphorical pen to paper. I, unfortunately, have to propel that pen over page after page to come up with my analysis in the first place. Although messier than I’d prefer, my process is also wondrous because it produces revelations every day. As I write, connections among events and trends come into view; reasons for behavior emerge; and big ruptures take me by surprise. As I wrote about Roche’s experiences in the 1940s, for instance, I wondered what I would think by the end: would she be the same sort of progressive in 1950 as in 1940, or would the war and subsequent anti-communist crusade transform her—and her progressive cohort—into something new, something I had to concede was dramatically different from the progressive she had been for so many decades previous? I just didn’t know what I’d think until I’d written my way through that tumultuous period of Roche’s life.

What was the biggest challenge involved with bringing this book to life?

RM: The biggest challenge in writing this book was keeping it short enough that someone might actually read it. Roche’s life is so rich and interesting, her thinking and writing so moving that I wanted to share everything I learned about her and everything that her life had taught me.

Especially hard to excise were dramatic, suggestive, or poignant scenes from Roche’s life. I considered laying out, for instance, evidence of a possible romance between Roche and her first political mentor, juvenile court judge Benjamin Lindsey. In the end, the evidence was thin enough that I decided it might seem more like historical gossip than anything else, but including it was very tempting. I also longed to narrate the hair-raising story of a pregnant teenager in Roche’s case load at Denver’s juvenile court, from whose parents Roche had to beg for consent to a caesarian section when their daughter went into convulsions during labor. The begging spanned a long, harrowing day and ultimately involved the parents’ neighbors, clergy, and physicians. Baby and mother were saved in the end, but the story vividly embodied the tensions among familial rights, state power, and individual freedom. Many an episode like these wound up on the cutting room floor.

How did you come up with the jacket?

RM: The design of the book jacket is a brilliant pun, for which I thank the ingenious designer, Chris Ferrante. As the book was going to press, Princeton asked me to share ideas for the cover. I responded that the cover should feature a photo of Roche, of course, and that I wanted her associated with POWER. I honestly put the word “power” all in caps. Since she was a coal magnate, I suggested, maybe we could include a coal tipple on the cover, or, because she was a Treasury official, maybe a shot of the colossal and classical Treasury Building in D.C. Either of these would associate Roche with a kind of power—corporate or governmental. Beyond that, I mused that I liked a New Deal aesthetic, which would place Roche in the decade of her greatest visibility and influence.

Chris took all of these ideas to heart. He super-imposed Roche’s image on the red, white, and blue design of a New Deal poster that had originally advertised the Rural Electrification Administration, that is, a poster that had promoted electrical power. Roche was thus associated with POWER, for sure, and with the New Deal as well. It was the perfect design.

What do you think is the book’s most important contribution?

RM: Most obviously, Relentless Reformer restores Josephine Roche to history and explains how such an important woman, who was a political celebrity in the 1930s, could have been lost to history thereafter. Because of this, I consider the book an act of gender justice.

Beyond that, the book offers insight and inspiration to anyone concerned about economic inequality in the twenty-first century as it analyzes a persistent and effective campaign to diminish similar inequalities between the late nineteenth century and the 1970s.

What are you reading right now?

RM: At bedtime, I read novels rather than history, and I have just finished the latest book in Alan Bradley’s mystery series, As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust. I love Bradley’s 12-year old sleuth, Flavia de Luce, who has a soaring spirit, brilliant wit, and passion for chemistry. She also has a habit of taking to the 1950’s English countryside on her trusty bike, Gladys. It’s hard to resist a detective who names her bike Gladys.

I’m drawn to detective fiction because it is so much like history: the detective begins with some kind of puzzle and must gather clues from the past to piece together a story so compelling that it explains the crime and reveals the culprit. Historians often follow a similar path.

As for history, I am reading a terrific dissertation by Chantel Rodriguez, “Health on the Line: The Politics of Citizenship and the Railroad Bracero Program of World War II.” In it, Rodriguez analyzes the experiences of Mexican guest workers who came to the U.S. to repair railroad tracks during the Second World War. She finds that, because of the health guarantees in the Mexican Constitution of 1917, these guest workers expected railroad companies and the U.S. government to protect their health while they worked in the U.S. Struggles of these workers to achieve what they perceived as their “health rights” sometimes succeeded and sometimes failed, and in both cases, their experiences reveal the complex landscape on which transnational workers still labor. This work edges us toward a new conception of citizenship and raises fresh questions about the trajectory of health rights in the United States.

Read the introduction to Relentless Reformer, here.


 

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Relentless Reformer:
Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America

Robyn Muncy

#NewBooks released February 2, 2015

 

bookjacket The Antarctic Dive Guide
Fully Revised and Updated Third edition

Lisa Eareckson Kelley

The Antarctic Dive Guide is the first and only dive guide to the seventh continent, until recently the exclusive realm of scientific and military divers. Today, however, the icy waters of Antarctica have become the extreme destination for recreational divers wishing to explore beyond the conventional and observe the strange marine life that abounds below the surface. This book is packed with information about the history of diving in Antarctica and its wildlife, and features stunning underwater photography.

 

bookjacket The Birth of Politics:
Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter

Melissa Lane

“The political ideas of the ancients still endure–and still propel us into debate and even more vigorous conflict…[T]he author successfully illuminates the political ideas that still perplex and divide us.” –Kirkus Reviews

 

bookjacket Climate Shock:
The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet

Gernot Wagner & Martin L. Weitzman

“A remarkable book on climate change, Climate Shock is deeply insightful, challenging, eye-opening, thought-provoking, and sheer fun to read. It will help you to think clearly and incisively about one of the most important issues of our generation.” –Jeffery Sachs, author of The Price of Civilization

 

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Erased:
Vanishing Traces of Jewish Galicia in Present-Day Ukraine

Omer Bartov

“Bartov tells us in Erased…that his tour was prompted by a wish to rediscover the Jewish world his mother had known as a child and to establish how the region’s Jews had died. But as his inquiry proceeds, its focus changed. Instead of adding to the vast corpus of Holocaust literature or celebrating the hayday of Galician Jewry, he has produced a study of collective denial and the means by which embarrassing facts about the past can be expunged from local memory. Bartov’s account of his experiences in the field makes a disturbing story.” –Phillip Longworth, Times Literary Supplement

 

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The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis
Ben S. Bernanke

“Anyone interested in a primer on recent financial history will likely find Bernake’s book to be worthwhile reading.” –Publishers Weekly

 

bookjacket From England to France:
Felony and Exile in the High Middle Ages

William Chester Jordan

“Jordan’s book is a thoroughly humane work of scholarship, chock full of vivid details and engaging stories that not only illustrate the central place of abjuration in High Medieval judicial practices, but also consistently reveal the social and emotional impact on individuals and communities of what was on its face an act of mercy, a mitigation of punishment. Jordan reminds us of the lives behind the laws.” –Adam J. Kosto, Columbia University

 

bookjacket Leaving the Jewish Fold:
Conversion and Radical Assimilation in Modern Jewish History

Todd M. Endelman

“Through his broad-ranging exploration of radical assimilation and conversion away from Judaism in the modern Occident over the past three centuries, Endelman examines a topic that other Jewish historians have ignored. In so doing, Endelman provides a complete portrait of how Jews respond to the challenges first brought on by Emancipation and Enlightenment in the eighteenth century. His magisterial work will richly reward students of Jewish history and multiculturalism, as well as students of modern culture.” –David Ellenson, chancellor, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion

 

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On Sacrifice
Moshe Halbertal

“This is a brilliant book.” –Robert A. Segal, Times Higher Education

 

bookjacket The Org:
The Underlying Logic of the Office

Updated edition
Ray Fisman & Tim SullivanWith a new preface by the authors

“Compelling…The Org aims to explain why organizations–be they private companies or government agencies–work the way they do.” –Eduardo Porter, New York Times

 

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Paths Out of Dixie:
The Democratization of Authoritarian Enclaves in America’s Deep South, 1944-1972

Robert Mickey

“In this remarkable book, Mickey focuses on Southern politics after the great public reversal of black disenfranchisement–and boldly compares the politics to authoritarianism. He grounds his compelling claims and narratives in an exceptionally confident handling of evidence, resulting in a major milestone in American political science. This vivid and profoundly illuminating book is certain to change views not just of Southern politics, but of the country we have been–and the national democracy we have become.” –Rick Valelly, Swarthmore College

 

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The Price of Rights:
Regulating International Labor Migration

Martin Ruhs

“This book lays down some challenging ideas on how we should think about the rights of migrants and needs to be read by everyone concerned with these issues.” –Don Flynn, director of the Migrants’ Rights Network

 

bookjacket Too Hot to Handle:
A Global History of Sex Education

Jonathan Zimmerman

“Using extensive research backed by an impressive notes section, Zimmerman (Innocents Abroad: American Teachers in the American Century, 2009, etc.) untangles the complex history of how and why sex education was first introduced as a specific subject to be taught in schools and its subsequent rise and fall as a teachable course over the past 100 years.” –Kirkus

 

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Would You Kill the Fat Man?
The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong

David Edmonds

“A lucid account of a famous thought experiment in moral philosophy.” –Editors’ Choice, New York Times Book Review

 

Andrew Hodges honored with Scripter Award

 

Andrew Hodges, author of ALAN TURING: THE ENIGMA

Andrew Hodges, author of Alan Turing: The Enigma

Congratulations to PUP author Andrew Hodges, who along with The Imitation Game screenwriter Graham Moore, has been awarded the USC Libraries Scripter Award. Hodges’s book, Alan Turing: The Enigma, was used as the basis for the screenplay of the Oscar-nominated film.

Calling bookworms and movie-goers alike — this award has something for all of you. Established in 1988, the USC Libraries Scripter Award is an honor that recognizes the best adaptation of word to film. The award is given to both the author and the screenwriter.

Alan Turing: The Enigma — a New York Times–bestselling biography of the founder of computer science — is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life. Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing’s life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing’s revolutionary idea of 1936 — the concept of a universal machine — laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design.

The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing’s leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. Turing’s work on this is depicted in The Imitation Game, which stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley.

Benedict Cumberbatch plays Alan Turing in THE IMITATION GAME © 2014 THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

Benedict Cumberbatch plays Alan Turing in THE IMITATION GAME © 2014 The Weinstein Company

At the same time, Alan Turing: The Enigma is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program — all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime. Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

Check out Chapter 1 of Alan Turing: The Enigma for yourself here.

The other four finalists for the Scripter award included:

  • Gillian Flynn, author and screenwriter of Gone Girl
  • Novelist Thomas Pynchon and screenwriter Paul Thomas Anderson for Inherent Vice
  • Jane Hawking, author of Travelling to Infinity: My Life With Stephen, and screenwriter Anthony McCarten for The Theory of Everything
  • Screenwriter Nick Hornby for Wild, adapted from Cheryl Strayed’s memoir Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail