PUP News of the World — October 23, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles — this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?

Just in time for your spooky Halloween week, the living dead has been spotted lurking in your local bookstore. But where? Check in the neuroscience section. Yes, you read that right.

With their endless wandering, lumbering gait, insatiable hunger, antisocial behavior, and apparently memory-less existence, zombies are the walking nightmares of our deepest fears. What do these characteristic behaviors reveal about the inner workings of the zombie mind? Could we diagnose zombism as a neurological condition by studying their behavior?

In Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?: A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain, neuroscientists and zombie enthusiasts Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek apply their neuro-know-how to dissect the puzzle of what has happened to the zombie brain to make the undead act differently than their human prey.

Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? is featured on Nerdist. Science editor Kyle Hill writes:

“Neuroscientists and zombie enthusiasts Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek have recently come out with a new book called Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?, in which they apply their neuroscience backgrounds to an investigation of the undead. It’s filled with pages of increasingly nerdy explorations of zombie behavior, and I highly recommend it, but what really caught my eye was the authors’ conclusion: All the walking dead have Consciousness Deficit Hypoactivity Disorder, or CDHD.”

Don’t be scared… check out this TED-Ed talk by Verstynen and Voytek (“Diagnosing a zombie: Brain and behavior”).

Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? was also featured on the blog of the NPR-affiliate in San Diego KPBS and featured in U-T San Diego.

It’s all fun until someone gets bitten. While you still can, take a look at the introduction.

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Cowardice

“Are you afraid to finish your book?” So begins a recent piece in the Times Higher Education by PUP author Chris Walsh. He continues:

My colleague was in the habit of needling his fellow scholars with this question. It struck particularly deep with me, because my book was about being afraid – or rather, it was about being excessively afraid and therefore failing to do what you should do. It was about cowardice.

For twenty years, Walsh has studied the topic of cowardice. What exactly is cowardice? When terrorists are called cowards, does it mean the same as when the term is applied to soldiers? And what, if anything, does cowardice have to do with the rest of us? His new book, fittingly named Cowardice: A Brief History, brings together sources from court-martial cases to literary and film classics such as Dante’s Inferno, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Thin Red Line, to recount the great harm that both cowards and the fear of seeming cowardly have done.

Walsh traces the idea of cowardice’s power to its evolutionary roots. But he also shows that this power has faded, most dramatically on the battlefield. Misconduct that earlier might have been punished as cowardice has more recently often been treated medically, as an adverse reaction to trauma, and Walsh explores a parallel therapeutic shift that reaches beyond war, into the realms of politics, crime, philosophy, religion, and love.

Cowardice is also reviewed on a Psychology Today blog. Glenn Altschuler writes:

“… a fresh and fascinating examination of the use of the term on – and off – the primal theater of cowardice, the battlefield.  Drawing on research in evolutionary biology as well as an informed interpretation of American history and literature, Walsh analyzes the relationship between courage and cowardice, the tendency to characterize men and not women as cowards, and the distinction between physical and moral cowardice.  Most important, Walsh argues, provocatively and persuasively, that over the past century the idea of cowardice has faded in significance, especially in military settings, and reappeared with somewhat different connotations.”

Check out this coverage of Cowardice in Inside Higher Ed, and preview the introduction for yourself.

 

Throwback Thursday #TBT: How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004)

Polya, How to Solve It

Hello again, folks! It’s time for a new edition of Throwback Thursday! On today’s #TBT, we’ll be discussing G. Polya’s classic, How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method

Originally published in 1945, Polya’s book is a brilliant guide to heuristic reasoning. It presents a mathematical method of problem-solving, and shows that any problem — mathematical or otherwise — that can be “reasoned” out can be solved by moving past irrelevancies and going straight to its core. Called an “important contribution to the teacher’s art” by the American Journal of Psychology, this books is an important and enjoyable read for students of all kinds of disciplines. A new paperback edition, the first since 2004, will be released this month.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of #TBT! Happy Thursday!

 

PUP News of the World — October 10, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles — this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


The Social Life of Money

Mobile money and Bitcoin — questions about the nature of money have gained a new urgency in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. Even as many people have less of it, there are more forms and systems of money. In The Social Life of Money, Nigel Dodd, one of today’s leading sociologists of money, reformulates the theory of the subject for a postcrisis world in which new kinds of money are proliferating.

What counts as legitimate action by central banks that issue currency and set policy? What underpins the right of nongovernmental actors to create new currencies? And how might new forms of money surpass or subvert government-sanctioned currencies? To answer such questions, The Social Life of Money takes a fresh and wide-ranging look at modern theories of money.

The Social Life of Money is reviewed in the Financial Times. Pietra Rivoli writes:

“Dodd presents a wide-ranging and sophisticated review and integration of the academic work related to alternative conceptions of modern money….[T]his is a richly rewarding book. Those of us accustomed to thinking of money as something we exchange for beer and pizza will never again have such a simple story.”

We’re putting our money where our mouth is — preview the introduction of The Social Life of Money and see how Dodd’s argument adds up.

The Copyright Wars

Today’s copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright—and its violation—a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates.

But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries—and their history is essential to understanding today’s battles. The Copyright Wars—the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today—tells this important story.

Peter Baldwin explains why the copyright wars have always been driven by a fundamental tension. Should copyright assure authors and rights holders lasting claims, much like conventional property rights, as in Continental Europe? Or should copyright be primarily concerned with giving consumers cheap and easy access to a shared culture, as in Britain and America? The Copyright Wars describes how the Continental approach triumphed, dramatically increasing the claims of rights holders.

An interview with Peter Baldwin ran in Publishers Weekly’s Frankfurt Show Daily issue (check out pages 34-36!).

Here is a sneak peak:

Andrew Richard Albanese: Why the title Copyright Wars? Has copyright historically been a war zone?

Peter Baldwin: There are two wars, partly overlapping. The historical war, which the book, as a work of history deals with, examines opposing visions of authors’ rights. Should copyright be seen as a temporary monopoly granted authors in order to stimulate them to further creativity? Or should copyright be seen as a form of property, much like more conventional property, that belongs to its owner wholly and perpetually.

That war was largely won by the mid-20th century when the US adopted the European position of strong authorial rights, and the British, as founding members of the Berne Convention, were pulled along by their international obligations in the same direction. But as digital technologies became widespread ad, the whole battle erupted anew. Digital has made it possible to reproduce and distribute almost for free. How were authors and owners going to assert claims to their works, now that they were no longer protected by the sheer physical inconvenience of the old analogue techniques of reproduction and distribution?

Be sure to take a look at the full interview!

The Copyright Wars was also reviewed on the Huffington Post by Glenn C. Altschuler. He writes:

“Baldwin has provided an often fascinating account of debates over intellectual property, including the defense of the moral rights of authors in Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. Most important, Baldwin makes a compelling case that although claims to intellectual property have strengthened over the last three hundred years, they do not rest in nature. Intellectual property is, in fact, ‘a contingent, socially created right, in thrall to what the lawmakers of the day’ decide it is.”

Check out Chapter One for yourself.

now 10.10

Throwback Thursday #TBT: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson

Happy Thursday, everybody! Welcome to a new edition of Throwback Thursday! On this week’s #TBT, we’re discussing Princeton University Press’s massive ongoing series, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson.

Projected to fill 60 volumes, the series began in 1950 with the publication of its first installment. The latest volume, 41, will be published early next year. Featuring all of Jefferson’s 18,000 letters as well as the more than 25,000 letters written to him, this magnificent project encompasses the third president’s private life and his contributions to American history, and represents an indispensable resource for historians. Barbara G. Oberg currently serves as the series’s general editor.

Jefferson’s Memorandum Books: Accounts, with Legal Records and Miscellany, 1767-1826 was published in 1997 as part of the Second Series of The Papers. This volume contains the most detailed coverage of Jefferson’s everyday life, and offer fascinating insights into the man’s mind. The Journal of Southern History called the volume “a resource rich in possibility for those who seek to understand the man and his world.”

We hope you’ve enjoyed this installment of #TBT. See you next Thursday!

 

 

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Richard D. McKinzie’s The New Deal for Artists (1973)

McKinzie, The New Deal for Artists

Hello again, folks! It’s time for another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this week’s #TBT, we’ll be discussing The New Deal for Artists by Richard D. McKinzie.

As for the rest of America, the Great Depression proved to be a trying time for America’s artists. Great innovators like Willem de Koonig, Arshille Gorky, Jackson Pollock, and Adolf Gottlieb found themselves producing rather conventional work under the patronage of the Roosevelt administration, struggling to maintain their integrity and stay afloat financially. This book traces the struggles, triumphs, and setbacks of America’s Depression-era artists under New Deal policies as they navigated through the worst economic turmoil the country has ever faced.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of #TBT! Don’t forget to check out next week’s installment!

PUP News of the World — September 29, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles — this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


Liberalism

Do you think you know what liberalism is? This vulnerable but critically important political creed dominates today’s politics just as it decisively shaped the past two hundred years of American and European history. Yet there is striking disagreement about what liberalism really means and how it arose.

In an engrossing history of liberalism—the first in English for many decades—veteran political observer Edmund Fawcett traces the ideals, successes, and failures of this central political tradition through the lives and ideas of a rich cast of European and American thinkers and politicians, from the early nineteenth century to today.

Liberalism: The Life of an Idea is reviewed in the New Republic. David Marquand writes:

Fawcett’s workmanlike history of the bundle of ideas and practices that liberals have espoused since the Spanish liberales coined the term after the Napoleonic wars is an excellent guide to liberalism’s rise and fall.

In Switzerland, Liberalism is reviewed in Neue Zuercher Zeitung. No matter what your political views, you will want to preview the introduction of Liberalism.

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The Bee

“Are the Bees Back Up on Their Knees?” A New York Times piece by PUP author Noah Wilson-Rich addresses the issue of colony collapse disorder, C.C.D., and what comes next for the bee. Wilson-Rich writes:

I became a beekeeper in 2005. When C.C.D. started, I was studying how social animals like honeybees resisted disease. We still don’t really know why C.C.D. was happening, but it looks as if we are turning the corner: Scientists I’ve spoken to in both academia and government have strong reason to believe that C.C.D. is essentially over. This finding is based on data from the past three years — or perhaps, more accurately, the lack thereof. There have been no conclusively documented cases of C.C.D. in the strict sense. Perhaps C.C.D. will one day seem like yet another blip on the millennium-plus timeline of unexplained bee die-offs. Luckily, the dauntless efforts of beekeepers have brought bee populations back each time.

While this is undoubtedly good news, we cannot let it blind us to a hard truth. Bees are still dying; it’s just that we’re finding the dead bodies now, whereas with C.C.D., they were vanishing. Bees are still threatened by at least three major enemies: diseases, chemicals (pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, etc.) and habitat loss.

Check out the full op-ed for Wilson-Rich’s take on the importance of pollinators and what policy changes could help the future of the bee. You can also hear an interview with Wilson-Rich on Radio Boston:

Wilson-Rich is the author of The Bee: A Natural History.

This book takes an incomparable look at this astounding diversity, blending an engaging narrative with practical, hands-on discussions of such topics as beekeeping and bee health. It explores our relationship with the bee over evolutionary time, delving into how it came to be, where it stands today, and what the future holds for humanity and bees alike.

The Bee

  • Provides an accessible, illustrated look at the human–bee relationship over time
  • Features a section on beekeeping and handy go-to guides to the identification, prevention, and treatment of honey bee diseases Covers bee evolution, ecology, genetics, and physiology
  • Includes a directory of notable bee species
  • Presents a holistic approach to bee health, including organic and integrated pest management techniques
  • Shows what you can do to help bee populations

Readers are buzzing about it — join in and preview the introduction of The Bee for yourself.

 

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Donald G. Mathews’s Slavery and Methodism: A Chapter in American Morality, 1780-1945 (1965)

Matthews, Slavery and Methodism - A Chapter in American Morality

Hello again, folks! It’s time for this week’s edition of Throwback Thursday! On this #TBT, we’re showcasing Donald G. Mathews’s Slavery and Methodism: A Chapter in American Morality, 1780-1845.

A 1780 conference of Methodist ministers identified slavery as an evil that went against humanity, God, and nature. When the Methodist Episcopal Church was officially organized in America four years later, it required its members to free their slaves or leave the congregation. But the church soon softened its stance; although slavery remained frowned upon, the church allowed the practice and set their own regulations in order to maintain their influence over white and black followers of the church and hold the institution together. Slavery and Methodism examines the six decades of religious turbulence that followed as the Methodist church struggled to maintain a precarious balance.

Called “essential reading for all students of American culture” by Choice, Mathews’s book is an illuminating read for anyone interested in Southern history and emancipation.

See you next Thursday!

 

 

PUP News of the World — September 5, 2014

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Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


now 9.5

The Passenger Pigeon

This week marked the 100th centennial of the death of the last passenger pigeon, Martha. She was living in the Cincinnati Zoo as the last living member of her species. The Financial Times‘ Matthew Engel commemorates the anniversary in a feature entitled “The extinction of the passenger pigeon.” Engel writes:

No one knows when the last great auk died. Or the last dodo. But the last passenger pigeon’s death can be dated more or less exactly: the afternoon of September 1 1914. There was something else extraordinary about this extinction. This was not some marginal species, retiring from trying to eke out an existence on a remote island or a lonely mountainside. When the white man arrived in North America, this was almost certainly the most common bird on the continent, quite possibly the most common in the world.

Some calculations suggest there were 3bn to 5bn. Others suggest there could have been up to 3bn in a single flock. This is like the extinction of the house fly. Or of grass. Or, perhaps, of the galumphing, domineering, myopic two-legged mammal whose presence did for the passenger pigeon. As the title of a centenary exhibition at the Smithsonian in Washington has it, Once There Were Billions. And then there were none.

Engel interviews PUP author Errol Fuller in this piece, and Fuller, who is a world authority on bird and animal extinction, has studied the story of Martha’s species extensively. His new book, The Passenger Pigeon, features rare archival images as well as haunting photos of live birds. Fuller shows how widespread deforestation, the demand for cheap and plentiful pigeon meat, and the indiscriminate killing of Passenger Pigeons for sport led to their catastrophic decline. Fuller provides an evocative memorial to a bird species that was once so important to the ecology of North America, and reminds us of just how fragile the natural world can be.

In a review of the book, Adrian Barnett of the New Scientist calls “visually beautiful” and writes that it “gives a fine account of the species, its biology and its demise.”

Preview the Introduction of The Passenger Pigeon.

Philosophy of Biology

Looking for an explanation of the most important topics debated by biologists today? Peter Godfrey-Smith’s Philosophy of Biology is a concise, comprehensive, and accessible introduction to the philosophy of biology written by a leading authority on the subject. The title is reviewed on Forbes.com, and John Farrell argues that “non-specialists should not be put off. Godfrey-Smith’s style is engaging, almost conversational.”

Peter Godfrey-Smith discusses the relation between philosophy and science; examines the role of laws, mechanistic explanation, and idealized models in biological theories; describes evolution by natural selection; and assesses attempts to extend Darwin’s mechanism to explain changes in ideas, culture, and other phenomena. Further topics include functions and teleology, individuality and organisms, species, the tree of life, and human nature.

Authoritative and up-to-date, Philosophy of Biology is an essential guide for anyone interested in the important philosophical issues raised by the biological sciences. Check out Chapter One of The Philosophy of Biology for yourself.

The New York Nobody Knows

Put on your walkin’ shoes — we’re off to explore New York with PUP author, William Helmreich. As a kid growing up in Manhattan, Helmreich played a game with his father they called “Last Stop.” They would pick a subway line and ride it to its final destination, and explore the neighborhood there. Decades later, Helmreich teaches university courses about New York, and his love for exploring the city is as strong as ever.

Putting his feet to the test, he decided that the only way to truly understand New York was to walk virtually every block of all five boroughs–an astonishing 6,000 miles. His epic journey lasted four years and took him to every corner of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Helmreich spoke with hundreds of New Yorkers from every part of the globe and from every walk of life, including Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former mayors Rudolph Giuliani, David Dinkins, and Edward Koch.

Their stories and his are the subject of his captivating and highly original book, The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City. The book is reviewed on TravelMag, and reviewer Paul Willis recalls one story of Helmreich’s many stories:

Helmreich, a sociology professor at New York’s City University (CUNY), is at his best when examining these broader demographic trends. He’s less good at giving life to the colour and flavor of the city. A New York native he grew up in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, a relatively privileged neighbourhood that borders Central Park. Maybe it’s this background that gives some of his encounters with new immigrants an awkward quality, such as when he meets a Honduran man waving a flag outside a Lower Manhattan car park to alert drivers that there’s space within and then asks if he can have a go at waving the flag himself.

“’Are you okay?’ he asked, a worried tone creeping into his voice.”

Helmreich reassures the man by telling him it’s alright because he’s a professor.

You don’t need to be a professor — or even leave the comfort of your favorite reading spot — to enjoy the city of New York through The New York Nobody Knows. Truly unforgettable, the book will forever change how you view the world’s greatest city. View Chapter One of The New York Nobody Knows, and tweet us your thoughts using #NYNobodyKnows.

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich (1990)

Makela, The Munich Secession - Art and Artists

Welcome to another installment of Throwback Thursday! On this #TBT, we’re honoring Maria Martha Makela’s The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich, another fascinating cultural study recently reissued as part of the Princeton Legacy Library series. Here’s a little bit about Makela’s book:

In April 1892 the first art Secession in the German-speaking countries came into being in Munich, Central Europe’s undisputed capital of the visual arts. Featuring the work of German painters, sculptors, and designers, as well as that of vanguard artists from around the world, the Munich Secession was a progressive force in the German art world for nearly a decade, its exhibitions regularly attended and praised by Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, and other modernists at the outset of their careers.

Peter Paret of The Art Bulletin called Makela’s book “the first thoroughly documented account of the Munich Secession in any language.” Anyone with an interest in turn-of-the-century European art is sure to find this study to their liking.

Until next Thursday!

Hot off the Presses — Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

Books released during the week of September 2, 2014
After the End of Art: Contemporary Art and the Pale of History<br>Arthur C. Danto<br>With a new foreword by Lydia Goehr After the End of Art:
Contemporary Art and the Pale of History
Arthur C. Danto

With a new foreword by Lydia Goehr

“If you are seriously attentive to contemporary art, you are already aware of Danto and his general positions, and owe it to yourself to read this book. If you are not, but are genuinely curious, you would do well to follow him. . . . Throughout it is clear and direct; at best, it is brilliantly crystalline. . . . I know of no more useful single book on art today.”–Michael Pakenham, Baltimore Sun
The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World<br>Adrienne Mayor The Amazons:
Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World
Adrienne Mayor

“An encyclopedic study of the barbarian warrior women of Western Asia, revealing how new archaeological discoveries uphold the long-held myths and legends. The famed female archers on horseback from the lands the ancient Greeks called Scythia appeared throughout Greek and Roman legend. Mayor tailors her scholarly work to lay readers, providing a fascinating exploration into the factual identity underpinning the fanciful legends surrounding these wondrous Amazons. . . . Mayor clears away much of the man-hating myths around these redoubtable warriors. Thanks to Mayor’s scholarship, these fearsome fighters are attaining their historical respectability.”–Kirkus Reviews
The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle<br>Peter Baldwin The Copyright Wars:
Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle
Peter Baldwin

“Scholarly but accessible and lucid; essential for students or modern intellectual property law and of much interest to a wide audience of writers, journalists, publishers and ‘content creators’.”–Kirkus
A Deadly Indifference: A Henry Spearman Mystery<br>Marshall Jevons A Deadly Indifference:
A Henry Spearman Mystery
Marshall Jevons

New in Paperback!

“Readers will find themselves effortlessly picking up the economic principles strewn about by the authors as clues…. The corpse, when it appears, is a show stopper.”–Deborah Stead, The New York Times Book Review
Defining Neighbors: Religion, Race, and the Early Zionist-Arab Encounter<br>Jonathan Marc Gribetz Defining Neighbors:
Religion, Race, and the Early Zionist-Arab Encounter
Jonathan Marc Gribetz

“The encounter between Jewish and Arab thinkers in Ottoman Palestine was subtler than we know. Jonathan Gribetz cannot redo the past, but his brilliant study of their mutual understanding gives us new language to use in this conversation going forward. An indispensable work.”–Ruth R. Wisse, professor emerita, Harvard University
Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?<br> A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain<br>Timothy Verstynen & Bradley Voytek Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?
A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain
Timothy Verstynen & Bradley Voytek

“In Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?, Verstynen and Voytek expertly unravel the mysteries of the zombie brain. Equal parts entertaining and informative, this important and brilliant must-read just might save the world someday. I gobbled it up like a zombie eating brains!”–Matt Mogk, author of Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Zombies
The Irrationals: A Story of the Numbers You Can't Count On<br>Julian Havil The Irrationals:
A Story of the Numbers You Can’t Count On
Julian Havil

New in Paperback!

“The insides of this book are as clever and compelling as the subtitle on the cover. Havil, a retired former master at Winchester College in England, where he taught math for decades, takes readers on a history of irrational numbers–numbers, like v2 or p, whose decimal expansion ‘is neither finite nor recurring.’ We start in ancient Greece with Pythagoras, whose thinking most likely helped to set the path toward the discovery of irrational numbers, and continue to the present day, pausing to ponder such questions as, ‘Is the decimal expansion of an irrational number random?’”–Anna Kuchment, Scientific American
Making Heretics: Militant Protestantism and Free Grace in Massachusetts, 1636-1641<br>Michael P. Winship Making Heretics:
Militant Protestantism and Free Grace in Massachusetts, 1636-1641
Michael P. Winship

New in Paperback!

“A major and refreshingly original study. . . . A remarkable portrait of how Puritanism generated and attempted and finally failed to control divergence from orthodoxy.”–Iain S. Maclean, James Madison University, Religious Studies Review
Murder at the Margin: A Henry Spearman Mystery<br>Marshall Jevons<br>With a new foreword by Herbert Stein and a new afterword by the author Murder at the Margin:
A Henry Spearman Mystery
Marshall Jevons

With a new foreword by Herbert Stein and a new afterword by the author

New in Paperback!

“Writing pseudonymously, [William Breit and Kenneth Elzinga] have created Henry Spearman, a Harvard economist (actually a “Chicago’ economist affiliated with Harvard), who utilizes the economic way of thinking literally to figure out “whodunit.’ If there is a more painless way to learn economic principles, scientists must have recently discovered how to implant them in ice cream.”–John R. Haring, Jr., Wall Street Journal
Mythematics: Solving the Twelve Labors of Hercules<br>Michael Huber Mythematics:
Solving the Twelve Labors of Hercules
Michael Huber

New in Paperback!

“The figures and diagrams are well chosen, the mathematics is presented attractively, the pace is appropriate. Unobtrusively, the general level of mathematical sophistication tends to rise as the book progresses. This book offers ideas to teachers seeking topics on which to pin some abstract maths, and could encourage students to think imaginatively about their subject, and where it might arise in unexpected circumstances.”–John Haigh, London Mathematical Society Newsletter
Russian Orthodoxy Resurgent: Faith and Power in the New Russia<br>John Garrard & Carol Garrard Russian Orthodoxy Resurgent:
Faith and Power in the New Russia
John Garrard & Carol Garrard

New in Paperback!

“At the heart of the book is a masterful biography of Alexy himself. . . . An important and meticulously researched book.”–Thomas de Waal, Times Literary Supplement
Zombies and Calculus<br>Colin Adams Zombies and Calculus
Colin Adams”If you’re dying to read a novel treatment of calculus, then you should run (don’t walk!) to buy Zombies and Calculus by Colin Adams. You’ll see calculus come alive in a way that could save your life someday.”–Arthur Benjamin, Harvey Mudd College

Throwback Thursday #TBT: Selected Letters of C. G. Jung, 1909-1961

Jung, Selected Letters, 1909-1961

Hello everybody! It’s Thursday again, and for this week’s Throwback (#TBT), we’re celebrating the Selected Letters of C. G. Jung, 1909-1961. The letters collected in this volume chronicle the founder of analytical psychology’s correspondence with friends, colleagues, and the people who came to him with problems. They also provide crucial insights into the beginnings of his theories and trace their development over the years.

Originally published in 1984, Selected Letters is one of many texts brought back by the Princeton Legacy Library series. It is also part of Princeton University Press’s esteemed Bollingen Series, named after the very Swiss village where Jung maintained a personal retreat.

That’s all for now, folks. See you next Thursday!

 

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the past week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
 4-10 Drezner_TheoriesZombies_cvr Theories of International Politics and Zombies by Daniel W. Drezner
Carlson_Tesla jacket
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
DarwinFinches 40 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Finches on Daphne Major Island by Peter R. Grant and B. Rosemary Grant
OnBullshit On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Banker's New Clothes
The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It by Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig
RoughCountry Rough Country: How Texas Became America’s Most Powerful Bible-Belt State by Robert Wuthnow
Everyday Calculus, O. Fernandez Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
SocialismCohen Why Not Socialism? by G. A. Cohen
OnWar
On War by Carol von Clausewitz