Congratulations to Shelley Frisch, 2014 Winner of the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize

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Shelley Frisch’s magnificent English translation of Reiner Stach’s German-language biography of Franz Kafka, entitled Kafka: Die Jahre der Erkenntnis (Kafka: The Years of Insight) has been named the 2014 winner of the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize. The award, established in 1996 by the Goethe-Institut Chicago, is given each spring to an outstanding German-to-English literary translation published in the U.S., with an accompanying prize of $10,000 funded by the German government.

Of her translation, the Goethe-Institut Chicago says that, “Frisch sustains Stach’s voice over hundreds of pages, finding fresh, compelling, and often witty ways to render his German to English,” and that even without a complete edition of Kafka’s work in English, “Frisch made the risky and courageous decision to provide her own translations of all the biography’s [Kafka] quotations.” The book examines the final years of Kafka’s life and  is monumental in scope, detailing disease, romance, and war in the wake of the collapsed Austro-Hungarian empire.

Shelley Frisch holds a PhD in German literature from Princeton University, and has taught at Columbia University while working as the Executive Editor of The Germanic Review. She also chaired the Haverford/Bryn Mawr Bi-College German Department prior to her transition into a full-time translator. Frisch’s second volume of the Kafka series, Kafka: The Decisive Years (Princeton), was awarded the Modern Language Association’s Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize. She is a prolific translator of other German books, including biographies of Nietzche and Einstein.

Congratulations to Rasmus Kleis Nielsen for winning the 2014 Doris Graber Book Award for the Political Communication Section of the American Political Science Association

05-20 NielsenRasmus Kleis Nielsen’s book, Ground Wars: Personalized Communication in Political Campaigns, is the 2014 winner of The Doris Graber Book Award for the Political Communication Section of the American Political Science Association. The Doris Graber Book Award is an annual prize given to the best book published on political communication in the last ten years, in order to foster the “study of political communications within the discipline of political science including research on mass media, telecommunications policy, new media technologies, and the process of communicating and understanding.”

In his book, Nielsen examines how American political operatives use “personalized political communication” to engage with the electorate, and delves into the myriad forms of political participation with their specific implications. Ground Wars demonstrates a challenge to popular imaginings of the political campaign as a tightly-controlled and highly monitored operation, and carefully traces the infiltration of specialized tactics into romanticized notions of grassroots-style volunteerism.

The chair of the committee commented that the committee voted for Nielsen’s book unanimously, “…finding it to be innovative, engaging and of very high quality relative to the terrific pool of nominee books.”

Nielsen will be officially honored at the annual APSA meeting in Chicago in August, 2014.

Two PUP books share the 2013 Sonia Rudikoff Prize from the Northeast Victorian Studies Association

Empty Houses: Theatrical Failure and the Novel by David Kurnick and The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860–1930 by Meredith Martin are co-Winners of the 2013 Sonia Rudikoff Prize, Northeast Victorian Studies Association. Congratulations!The Rudikoff Prize was awarded for the best first book in Victorian Studies published in 2012. Here’s a bit more about the award from their web site:“The Sonya Rudikoff Award was established by the Robert Gutman family in honor of Mr. Gutman’s late wife. Ms. Rudikoff was an active member of the Northeast Victorian Studies Association and a recognized scholar. Her book, Ancestral Houses: Virginia Woolf and the Aristocracy, was published posthumously. A text nominated for this award should be the author’s first book, and the subject should address Victorian literature and/or culture. Our focus is on Victorian Great Britain and the Empire, though we will consider texts that are transatlantic in focus. We will not, however, consider texts that are strictly American Victorian.”

Link to the list of current and past winners: http://www.nvsa.org/rudikoff3.htm

Congratulations to David Kurnick and Meredith Martin!

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Congratulations to Howard Wainer for winning the 2014 AERA Division D Significant Contribution to Educational Measurement and Research Methodology Award from the American Educational Research Association

j9529[1]Uneducated Guesses: Using Evidence to Uncover Misguided Education Policies by Howard Wainer is winner of the 2014 AERA Division D Significant Contribution to Educational Measurement and Research Methodology Award, American Educational Research Association. The award “recognizes one publication that represents a significant conceptual advancement in theory and practice of educational measurement and/or research methodology. This year’s award recognizes such a publication in the area of Quantitative Methods and Statistical Theory. The evaluation criteria are quality, originality, and potential impact.”
In their citation for the award, the commitee notes, “In his book, Wainer describes, evaluates, and illustrates complex statistical reasoning embedded in a wide range of important educational policies in ways that are easily accessible and penetrable to non-technical people. This collective work evaluates the relationship between sophisticated statistical and psychometric machinery and challenges the educational policies and practices that have far-reaching impact on our society at large. Wainer’s thought-provoking writing regarding the perils of misusing quantitative measurement outcomes represents a significant contribution that is likely to shape educational research and practice for many generations.”

Waiting for José wins the 2013 Southwest Book Award from the Border Regional Library Association

Shapira_Waiting for JoseHarel Shapira - Waiting for José: The Minutemen’s Pursuit of America

Winner of a 2013 Southwest Book Award, Border Regional Library Association

“Since 1971 the Southwest Book Awards have been presented in recognition of outstanding books about the Southwest published each year in any genre (e.g. fiction, nonfiction, reference) and directed toward any audience (scholarly, popular, children). Original video and audio materials are also considered.”  An awards banquet was held in El Paso on February 22, 2014.

Here is a complete list of the 2013 winners:  http://brla.info/swba13.shtml

About the book: Harel Shapira lived with the Minutemen and patrolled the border with them, seeking neither to condemn nor praise them, but to understand who they are and what they do. Challenging simplistic depictions of these men as right-wing fanatics quick on the trigger, Shapira discovers a group of men who long for community and embrace the principles of civic engagement. Yet these desires and convictions have led them to a troubling place.

Shapira takes you to that place–a stretch of desert in southern Arizona, where he reveals that what draws these men to the border is not simply racism or anti-immigrant sentiments, but a chance to relive a sense of meaning and purpose rooted in an older life of soldiering. They come to the border not only in search of illegal immigrants, but of lost identities and experiences.

Sample the introduction of Waiting for José here: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9962.pdf

Spot the Princeton University Press titles in the PROSE awards rap

Princeton University Press wins big at the 2014 PROSE Awards

American_PROSE_awards_logo[1] The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) announced the 2013 PROSE Award Winners yesterday at the PSP Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.  According to the PROSE press release, the 2013 PROSE Awards received a record-breaking 535 entries—more than ever before in its 38-year history—in more than 40 categories. For full information about the 2013 PROSE Award winners: http://www.proseawards.com/current-winners.html

Princeton University Press won top awards in 3 Book Subject Categories, and received 11 Honorable Mention awards—a total of 14 awards. We are so happy to congratulate our authors:

 

3 Category Award Winners

Robert Bartlett, Why Can the Dead Do Such Great Things?
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

Thomas G. Pavel, The Lives of the Novel
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Literature, Association of American Publishers

Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig, The Bankers’ New Clothes
Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers

 

11 Honorable Mention Winners

S. Frederick Starr, Lost Enlightenment
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in European and World History, Association of American Publishers

John Sides and Lynn Vavreck, The Gamble
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Government & Politics, Association of American Publishers

Ruth R. Wisse, No Joke
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Language & Linguistics, Association of American Publishers

W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Jeremy Adelman, Worldly Philosopher
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biography & Autobiography, Association of American Publishers

Katrina van Grouw, The Unfeathered Bird
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Lance Fortnow, The Golden Ticket
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Popular Science & Mathematics, Association of American Publishers

Jeremiah P. Ostriker and Simon Mitton, Heart of Darkness
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Cosmology & Astronomy, Association of American Publishers

Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, The Warbler Guide
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Single Volume Reference/Science, Association of American Publishers

Angus Deaton, The Great Escape
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers

William B. Helmreich, The New York Nobody Knows
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Sociology & Social Work, Association of American Publishers

Peter Brown Wins 2013 Philip Schaff Prize

Peter Brown – Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome, and the Making of Christianity in the West, 350-550 AD
Winner of the 2013 Philip Schaff Prize, American Society of Church History

The Philip Schaff Prize is an award in the amount of $2,000 to the author of the best book published in the two previous calendar years, originating in the North American scholarly community, which presents original research on any period in the history of Christianity, or makes a significant synthesizing scholarly contribution.  According to Dr. Keith Francis, Executive Secretary of ASCH, “The members of the committee described Through the Eye of a Needle as a ‘tour de force,’ a ‘magisterial study,’ and a ‘work of astonishing erudition.’  High praise indeed!  I was even more impressed by the comment that you had written ‘a brilliant synthesis of other scholars’ work as well as the harvest of your own five-decade career.” The prize will be awarded at ASCH’s next business meeting in Washington DC on January 4, 2014. For more information, click here.

k9807Jesus taught his followers that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter heaven. Yet by the fall of Rome, the church was becoming rich beyond measure. Through the Eye of a Needle is a sweeping intellectual and social history of the vexing problem of wealth in Christianity in the waning days of the Roman Empire, written by the world’s foremost scholar of late antiquity.

Peter Brown, the world’s foremost scholar of late antiquity, examines the rise of the church through the lens of money and the challenges it posed to an institution that espoused the virtue of poverty and called avarice the root of all evil. Drawing on the writings of major Christian thinkers such as Augustine, Ambrose, and Jerome, Brown examines the controversies and changing attitudes toward money caused by the influx of new wealth into church coffers, and describes the spectacular acts of divestment by rich donors and their growing influence in an empire beset with crisis. He shows how the use of wealth for the care of the poor competed with older forms of philanthropy deeply rooted in the Roman world, and sheds light on the ordinary people who gave away their money in hopes of treasure in heaven.

Through the Eye of a Needle challenges the widely held notion that Christianity’s growing wealth sapped Rome of its ability to resist the barbarian invasions, and offers a fresh perspective on the social history of the church in late antiquity.

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton University. His many books include The World of Late Antiquity, The Rise of Western Christendom, and Augustine of Hippo.

 

Leah Price Recieves Honorable Mention for the 2012 James Russell Lowell Prize

Leah Price - How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain
Honorable Mention for the 2012 James Russell Lowell Prize, Modern Language Association

The James Russell Lowell Prize is awarded annually for an outstanding book—a literary or linguistic study, a critical edition of an important work, or a critical biography—written by a member of the association. “Leah Price’s How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain disentangles the network of practices the Victorians developed for not reading their books through an innovative approach she calls rejection history. By analyzing the many uses of books aside from being read, Price provides an exhaustive and well-documented account of their material life and culture. From paperweight to garbage, she looks at the evolution of the bound book in ways that trump what can only be read between the covers. Giving welcome attention not only to familiar literary classics but also to less-studied genres, Price provides new models for reading the history of the book as object, commodity, and literary artifact. To learn more about this award, click here.

k9714How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain asks how our culture came to frown on using books for any purpose other than reading. When did the coffee-table book become an object of scorn? Why did law courts forbid witnesses to kiss the Bible? What made Victorian cartoonists mock commuters who hid behind the newspaper, ladies who matched their books’ binding to their dress, and servants who reduced newspapers to fish ‘n’ chips wrap?

Shedding new light on novels by Thackeray, Dickens, the Brontës, Trollope, and Collins, as well as the urban sociology of Henry Mayhew, Leah Price also uncovers the lives and afterlives of anonymous religious tracts and household manuals. From knickknacks to wastepaper, books mattered to the Victorians in ways that cannot be explained by their printed content alone. And whether displayed, defaced, exchanged, or discarded, printed matter participated, and still participates, in a range of transactions that stretches far beyond reading.

Supplementing close readings with a sensitive reconstruction of how Victorians thought and felt about books, Price offers a new model for integrating literary theory with cultural history. How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain reshapes our understanding of the interplay between words and objects in the nineteenth century and beyond.

Leah Price is professor of English at Harvard University. She is the author of The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel.

Meredith Martin Wins the 2012 MLA Prize for a First Book

Meredith MartinThe Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860–1930
Winner of the 2012 MLA Prize for a First Book, Modern Language Association

Meredith Martin’s The Rise and Fall of Meter is an impressive, elegant work that intervenes in old and new literary histories alike. This book traces the surprisingly polemical history of the standardization of English prosody. Bringing to light new archival materials, the work excavates the full turbulence and excitement of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century debates about English verse rhythms. Complex, concise, and clear, Martin’s book deftly weaves together cultural analysis; the study of language, form, and sound; and literary history. With a rich critical eclecticism, the book reframes and reanimates our understanding of the history of poetry and poetics. The result is an intriguing story, as relevant to the new aesthetics as it is to older historical and cultural studies. Martin’s work reminds us that at its best, great scholarship has much in common with great storytelling. To read more, click here.

http://press.princeton.edu/images/k9715.gif The Rise and Fall of Meter tells the unknown story of English meter from the late eighteenth century until just after World War I. Uncovering a vast and unexplored archive in the history of poetics, Meredith Martin shows that the history of prosody is tied to the ways Victorian England argued about its national identity. Gerard Manley Hopkins, Coventry Patmore, and Robert Bridges used meter to negotiate their relationship to England and the English language; George Saintsbury, Matthew Arnold, and Henry Newbolt worried about the rise of one metrical model among multiple competitors. The pressure to conform to a stable model, however, produced reactionary misunderstandings of English meter and the culture it stood for. This unstable relationship to poetic form influenced the prose and poems of Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, W. B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, and Alice Meynell. A significant intervention in literary history, this book argues that our contemporary understanding of the rise of modernist poetic form was crucially bound to narratives of English national culture.

Meredith Martin is associate professor of English at Princeton University.

W. Patrick McCray Win the 2012 Eugene E. Emme Award

W. Patrick McCray - The Visioneers: How a Group of Elite Scientists Pursued Space Colonies, Nanotechnologies, and a Limitless Future
Winner of the 2012 Eugene E. Emme Award for Astronautical Literature, American Astronautical Society

The annual Eugene M. Emme Astronautical Literature Awards, named for NASA’s first Historian, recognize outstanding books which advance public understanding of astronautics through originality, scholarship and readability. For more information about the AAS Emme Award, click here.

http://press.princeton.edu/images/k9822.gifIn 1969, Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill began looking outward to space colonies as the new frontier for humanity’s expansion. A decade later, Eric Drexler, an MIT-trained engineer, turned his attention to the molecular world as the place where society’s future needs could be met using self-replicating nanoscale machines. These modern utopians predicted that their technologies could transform society as humans mastered the ability to create new worlds, undertook atomic-scale engineering, and, if truly successful, overcame their own biological limits. The Visioneers tells the story of how these scientists and the communities they fostered imagined, designed, and popularized speculative technologies such as space colonies and nanotechnologies.

Patrick McCray traces how these visioneers blended countercultural ideals with hard science, entrepreneurship, libertarianism, and unbridled optimism about the future. He shows how they built networks that communicated their ideas to writers, politicians, and corporate leaders. But the visioneers were not immune to failure–or to the lures of profit, celebrity, and hype. O’Neill and Drexler faced difficulty funding their work and overcoming colleagues’ skepticism, and saw their ideas co-opted and transformed by Timothy Leary, the scriptwriters of Star Trek, and many others. Ultimately, both men struggled to overcome stigma and ostracism as they tried to unshackle their visioneering from pejorative labels like “fringe” and “pseudoscience.”

The Visioneers provides a balanced look at the successes and pitfalls they encountered. The book exposes the dangers of promotion–oversimplification, misuse, and misunderstanding–that can plague exploratory science. But above all, it highlights the importance of radical new ideas that inspire us to support cutting-edge research into tomorrow’s technologies.

W. Patrick McCray is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Keep Watching the Skies!: The Story of Operation Moonwatch and the Dawn of the Space Age (Princeton) and Giant Telescopes: Astronomical Ambition and the Promise of Technology.

Peter Dougherty and Robert Shiller off to the Nobel prize ceremony

Looking dapper in their tuxedos, 2013 Nobel in Economics co-winner Robert Shiller (r) and Princeton University Press Director Peter Dougherty (l) prepare for the awards ceremony today at the Stockholm Concer Hall in Sweden. Shiller, along with fellow economists Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen (also a PUP author), were awarded the prize in October. Read all about winners of the The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2013, as it is officially called, on the official website.

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