Fiona Sze-Lorrain: The Ruined Elegance

poetry
Sze-LorrainIn celebration of National Poetry Month, Fiona Sze-Lorrain has recorded Given Silence from The Ruined Elegance, her collection of poems in the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets series. 

 

 

 

 

Given Silence

Fiona Sze-Lorrain is a poet, literary translator, editor, and zheng harpist. The author of two previous books of poetry in English, My Funeral Gondola and Water the Moon, she also writes and translates in French and Chinese. She lives in Paris.

Stephanie Rojas: Getting to know Blackwell’s Oxford

Blackwell'sWalking down the stairs to the basement level of Blackwell’s Oxford, I did not immediately notice the cavernous room I had entered. As Sales Manager David Kelly described the history of the store to PUP Publicist Katie Lewis and me, I was engrossed in taking notes on my phone for a potential blog post. Typing as I walked, I finally looked up just as David was telling us that there is a total of three miles of shelving crammed into that one floor of the multi-level store!   

This year, I was privileged to have the opportunity to travel to the UK to attend the London Book Fair and to visit the Princeton University Press office in Woodstock, Oxfordshire in my role as Marketing & Social Media Associate. Thanks to my colleague Katie, I was excited to also be able to take a tour of Blackwell’s, PUP’s largest UK account, while I was in the area. Blackwell’s flagship location was not always as physically arresting as it is today. Opening its doors in 1879, the bookshop was about the size of a decent walk-in closet. Standing in the space, I imagined books piled high, partially blocking out the sunlight from the front windows, with floorboards creaking beneath my feet. The Blackwell family’s aim was to open a book store that catered not only to the many students who make their temporary home in and around Oxford, but also to the town residents. Today, that original space serves as an inviting entryway to rooms lined floor to ceiling with books. 

Blackwell's

The Atlas of Ancient Rome by Andrea Carandini. It’s always exciting to see a PUP book out in the wild!

Blackwell’s has an excellent reputation for stocking academic books; indeed, it is part of the philosophy of the store to stock every important book within a given field—rather than the one or two that might be bestsellers—because it is vital for readers to have access to the selection of different viewpoints and ideas. Blackwell’s is able to maintain that standard due to their online presence; in fact, they were the first bookshop to sell online (even though they readily admit that it was not executed as well as it could have been—they have come a long way in the intervening years!). But I was surprised to learn that Blackwell’s is also a leader in fiction—their sales in fiction have actually grown at double the rate of the industry for the past four years.

Blackwell’s is more than a bookstore; it is also a community hub. When I was there, they were in the middle of a sold out run of Dracula put on by Creation Theatre. They host an event nearly every Saturday, including a monthly series called Philosophy in the Bookshop in collaboration with British  philosopher and host of the Philosophy Bytes podcast Nigel Warburton. It seemed to me that there is always something interesting going on. 

My trip to Blackwell’s was certainly a highlight in a great week in the UK, and I hope I have the opportunity to visit again!

Seneca on How to Die

Romm“It takes an entire lifetime to learn how to die,” preached Seneca, the famed Stoic philosopher of Ancient Rome. In other words, it’s never too early to begin your preparations for departing this life. Seneca wrote eloquently on the universality of death, its importance as life’s final and most defining rite of passage, its part in purely natural processes and cycles, and its ability to liberate us. In How to Die, James Romm has selected and translated excerpts relating to death and dying from eight different works of ethical thought by Seneca—let it be your handy companion on your journey toward reconciling with the inevitable. Here are five tips from How to Die to ponder as you prepare for what may be the most important task you will ever undertake.

 

Prepare Yourself

“Perhaps you think it is useless to learn something that must only be used once; but this is the very reason we ought to rehearse.”

Have No Fear

“What’s to be feared in returning where you came from? He lives badly who does not know how to die well…. [D]ying fearfully, often, is itself a cause of death…. He who fears death will never do anything to help the living. But he who knows that this was decreed the moment he was conceived will live by principle.”

Have No Regrets

“We consider this earth, with its cities, peoples, and rivers, enclosed by a circle of sea, as a tiny dot, if it’s compared with all of time…. What difference does it make to extend [life], if the amount of added time is little more than nothing?”

Set Yourself Free

“Each of us ought to seek a life that wins approval from others, but a death, from himself.”

Become Part of the Whole

“There are fixed seasons by which all things progress; they must be born, grow, and perish…. There is nothing that does not grow old. Nature disperses these things, all to the same end, though after different intervals. Whatever is, will no longer be; it won’t die, but will be undone.”

Skull

Check out Matthew Salganik’s Tedx Talk

SalganikIn just the past several years, we have witnessed the birth and rapid spread of social media, mobile phones, and numerous other digital marvels. In addition to changing how we live, these tools enable us to collect and process data about human behavior on a scale never before imaginable, offering entirely new approaches to core questions about social behavior. Princeton professor Matthew Salganik’s new book, Bit by Bit, is the key to unlocking these powerful methods—a landmark book that will fundamentally change how the next generation of social scientists and data scientists explores the world around us. He outlines these methods in a recent lecture on Tedx—watch it below, and head over to the companion website to order an exam copy, read the book, look over supplemental teaching materials, and more.

Matthew J. Salganik is professor of sociology at Princeton University, where he is also affiliated with the Center for Information Technology Policy and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research has been funded by Microsoft, Facebook, and Google, and has been featured on NPR and in such publications as the New Yorker, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

A peek inside Cézanne Portraits

Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) may be best known for his landscapes, but he also painted some 160 portraits throughout his exceptional career. This major work establishes portraiture as an essential practice for Cézanne, from his earliest self-portraits in the 1860s; to his famous depictions of figures including his wife Hortense Fiquet, the writer Emile Zola, and the art dealer Ambroise Vollard; and concluding with a poignant series of portraits of his gardener Vallier, made shortly before Cézanne’s death. Beautifully illustrated with works of art drawn from public and private collections around the world, Cézanne Portraits presents an astonishingly broad range of images that reveal the most personal and human qualities of this remarkable artist. Check out the trailer below to learn more about the book, and the exhibition schedule below:

Exhibition Schedule:
National Portrait Gallery, London (October 26, 2017 to February 11, 2018)
National Gallery of Art, Washington (March 25 to July 1, 2018

A peek inside ‘Paul Cézanne: Painting People’

This beautifully illustrated book features twenty-four masterpieces in portraiture by celebrated French artist Paul Cézanne (1839–1906), offering an excellent introduction to this important aspect of his work. Art historian Mary Tompkins Lewis contributes an illuminating essay on Cézanne and his portraiture for general readers, alongside an illustrated chronology of the artist’s life and work. Check out the trailer to see a preview of Cézanne’s stunning portraiture.

Mary Tompkins Lewis is an art historian, critic, and visiting associate professor of fine arts at Trinity College, Hartford. Her books include Cézanne: Art and Ideas and Cézanne’s Early Imagery.

#UPWeek: Producing the Books that Matter

UPWeek2017

Have you ever wondered how publishers think about their books and the publishing process? Now is your chance to learn the answer to those questions and more with a video put together by Ingram in honor of University Press Week, featuring Christie Henry, director of Princeton University Press, Jennifer Crewe, director of Columbia University Press, and Taylor Dietrich of Cambridge University Press.

#AskAnEditor Twitter Round Up

To celebrate University Press Week, we invited the reading public to #AskAnEditor, and boy did you all have questions! For five hours, Twitter users had the opportunity to pepper our editors in a variety of disciplines with questions on everything from how to get into publishing, to open access, to illustration programs. In case you missed it, here’s a round-up of some of our favorites. Thanks to everyone who participated in the publishing community and beyond.

#UPWeek: #Twitterstorm

UPWeek2017

We’re excited to be participating in AAUP’s annual University Press Week! Check this space every day this week for posts from our fellow university presses. Today, the theme is #Twitterstorm.

Harvard University Press provides a look at how social media has played a role in the publication of Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide

Editorial Director of Johns Hopkins University Press Greg Britton extols the virtues of Twitter in university press publishing

Athabasca University Press tells the remarkable story of how they used social media to create a citywide book club

Finally, Beacon Press describes how social media helped with the success of Christopher Emdin’s For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too

Two PUP Books Longlisted for the 2018 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prizes

We are delighted that Monarchs and Milkweed by Anurag Agrawal and Welcome to the Universe by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Michael Strauss, and J. Richard Gott have been longlisted for the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prizes for Excellence in Science Books!

The Prizes celebrate outstanding science writing and illustration for children and young adults and are meant to encourage the writing and publishing of high-quality science books for all ages. AAAS believes that, through good science books, this generation, and the next, will have a better understanding and appreciation of science.

Agrawal

Welcome to the Universe

#UPWeek: Producing the books that matter

UPWeek2017

We’re excited to be participating in AAUP’s annual University Press Week! Check this space every day this week for posts from our fellow university presses. Today, the theme is Producing the books that matter.

The University of Kansas Press shares a post on the relationship between the editorial and production departments, and how they interact to create books

University of California Press shares their thoughts on producing the books that matter.

The University of Michigan Press interviewed the author of Academic Ableism

On the Fordham University Press blog, David Goodwin talks about the production of his book, Left Bank of the Hudson

University of Washington Press director and AAUP president Nicole Mitchell writes on advocating for the value of university presses

Finally, Yale University Press features an episode from their podcast on the making of the Voynich Manuscript

#UPWeek Blog Tour: Selling the Facts

UPWeek2017

We’re excited to be participating in AAUP’s annual University Press Week! Check this space every day this week for posts from our fellow university presses. Today, the theme is Selling the Facts.

The University of Minnesota Press interviewed booksellers about bookselling in the current political climate

University of Texas Press features Guerilla-style interviews with local booksellers on their experiences serving readers since the election.

From the University of Hawai’i Press, check out this round up of interesting and peer-reviewed facts by UH Press journals over the past year.

Johns Hopkins University Press invited their local independent bookstore, the Ivy Bookshop, to write about selling books in the Age of Trump.

Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper of Duke University Press reports on how Frankfurt Book Fair attendees were engaging with Trump and Brexit.

Northeast Sales Representative for the Columbia University Press Sales Consortium describes making sales calls during the 2016 presidential campaign.

The University Press of Kentucky brings us a guest post by the UK Libraries exploring the societal benefits in university presses continuing to publish so that readers continue to have well-researched, long-form content in an age of distraction, manufactured outrage, and hyper partisanship.

Finally, The University Press of Toronto posts on a day in the life of a Canadian higher education sales rep selling books on US campuses.