Bird Fact Friday – Northern Harrier

From page 140 of Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

Norther Harriers are slim-bodied raptor with long legs, long wings, and a long tail. Their distinctive quartering flight, flying low over the ground, is unique. A white patch on the uppertail coverts and a dark head that appears hooded and shows an owllike facial disk are distinctive. Sexes have different adult plumages, but are nearly identical in juvenile plumage. Females are noticeably larger than males.

Northern Harrier (Circus hudsonius). Adult female. Adult females have brown upperparts, heavily streaked underparts, white bands on underwings, and yellow eyes. Photo credit: Richard Pavek

They hunt most of the time with their distinctive quartering flight, flying low over the ground and pouncing quickly when prey is spotted. However, they can fly directly toward avian prey in a rapid flight from some distance, with a short, twisting tail chase at the end. Males prey more on birds, while females take more mammals, but they both take both. They have been reported to drown waterfowl. Recent studies have shown that Northern Harriers can locate prey by sound almost as well as owls can, which explains the facial disk.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Five Books for Hawk Migration Season

From hawks, to falcons, to our illustrious bald eagle, raptors are the kings of the sky, so it seems only right to pay homage to them during this fall migration season. Whether you’re a birdwatching pro or new to the hobby, we’ve picked out five guides that can help you identify various raptors across America and learn more about birds as a whole.

Whether soaring or perched, diurnal birds of prey often present challenging identification problems for the bird enthusiast. Variable plumage, color morphs, and unique individual characteristics are just some of the factors bird watchers must consider when identifying the different species. In A Photographic Guide to North American Raptors, two of the world’s top experts on raptors provide an essential guide to the variations in the species, allowing for easier recognition of key identification points. All the distinguishing marks described have been exhaustively tested in a wide range of field conditions by the authors as well as the colleagues and students who have learned from them.
Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.
Comprehensive and authoritative, The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors covers all thirty-four of North America’s diurnal raptor species (all species except owls). Each species is featured in stunning color plates that show males and females, in a full spectrum of ages and color variants, depicted near and far, in flight and at rest, and from multiple angles, all caught in their typical habitats. There are also comparative, multispecies scenes and mystery photographs that allow readers to test their identification skills, along with answers and full explanations in the back of the book. In addition, the book features an introduction, and thirty-four color maps accompany the plates.
The ultimate must-have guide for identifying migrant raptors, Hawks at a Distance is the first volume to focus on distant raptors as they are truly seen in the field. Jerry Liguori, a leading expert on North American raptors, factors in new information and approaches for identifying twenty-nine species of raptor in various lighting situations and settings. The field guide’s nineteen full-color portraits, 558 color photos, and 896 black-and-white images portray shapes and plumages for each species from all angles. Useful flight identification criteria are provided and the accompanying text discusses all aspects of in-flight hawk identification, including flight style and behavior. Concentrating on features that are genuinely observable at a distance, this concise and practical field guide is ideal for any aspiring or experienced hawk enthusiast.
Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species from the various angles that they are seen. Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, this is a unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail–the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada.

You can also check out this sample raptor ID guide from The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors for a taste of what you’ll find in these publications.

What It Means to Give Back on Uneasy Street

Uneasy StreetWhen Rachel Sherman set out to gain an understanding of how the wealthy feel about their position of privilege in modern society, she put aside her preconceived notions and assumptions. She wanted to avoid the “voyeurism, skepticism, and moral judgment” that permeates mainstream representations of individuals from the upper class, seen in media like the “Real Housewives” series. In Uneasy Street, Sherman attempts to challenge the presumption that, “rich people are unpleasant, greedy, [or] competitive consumers.” Her interviews with over fifty members of the NY-based economic elite might surprise readers—especially when it comes to issues like charity and “giving back” to those less fortunate.

Early in Uneasy Street, Sherman describes the characteristics that, according to her interviewees, make up a “good person” on the upper echelon of society. These people valued hard work above all else, as well as self-sufficiency, productivity, and independence. But one surprising personality trait desired by many is the obligation to “give back”—the only trait that explicitly recognizes the inherent privilege of the interviewees. But what does this mean for the upper class? With so many different charitable causes, and so many ways they could provide support to those in need, Sherman highlighted the varying ways that this community gave back.

On a most basic level, many of Sherman’s interviewees emphasized the importance of the Golden Rule — “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” This includes presuming equivalence, and therefor equality, by not discussing money with others and treating service providers (waiters, personal concierges, etc.) with respect. But, when it came to giving money, Sherman said that most interviewees turned towards organizations that were personal to them. For example, lawyers tended to donate to legal aide, while artists gave to arts organizations. Others took a more direct approach to their charity, by attending or organizing galas, luncheons, and even full fundraising drives.

But sometimes an interviewees’ service for others was lateral—not for someone less fortunate than them, but someone of equal standing in society. For example, inviting friends and neighbors on expensive vacations, or hosting their child’s class party in their home. Additionally, when it came to giving money, there were some interviewees who made their donations to organizations from which their money had or will eventually benefit them. For example, their alma maters or their child’s school. Some even associated their annual taxes with charity work, since they felt that they would not benefit from where that money was going.

The most interesting observation about charity work, however, is the way that giving back became a value for many families, passed down from generation to generation. Many of the adults interviewed mentioned that the act of donating a portion of their income was instilled in them from a young age by parents, with those who had been giving back from a young age less willing to serve as a public face for philanthropic efforts. These adults were also attempting to pass along such values to their children by insisting they spend a portion of their time volunteering at local homeless shelters, or even the neighborhood public schools, so that they get an idea of what life is like for the less fortunate living around them.

These (occasionally conflicting) viewpoints on philanthropy is only one of the many ways that Sherman peeks past the curtain and reveals an upper class more complicated and caring than their reality TV counterparts. With Uneasy Street, she hopes to provide a thorough examination of how the other half really lives.

Bird Fact Friday – Townsend’s Warbler

From pages 440-442 in The Warbler’s Guide:

Townsend’s Warbler is easily identified by its high-contrast yellow face, which also contains a dark ear patch and yellow undereye arc. These warblers have variably black throats boarded by yellow, and dark streaking. In addition, they have a dark olive-green back and white wing bars. Their dark flight feathers contrast with their yellow bodies. Additionally, Townsend’s Warblers are identified by their white bellies and tails. They also have a distinctive, contrasty facial pattern.

The Townsend Warbler (Setophaga townsendi) perched on a branch. Photo courtesy of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. Copyright: Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson.

This warbler breeds in conifers; during migration, they can use a range of habitats, but are often found in pines whenever available. Their breeding range overlaps with Hermit Warbler’s, and hybrids between the two are found annually. Townsend’s Warblers are typically found in the western part of the United States.

The Warbler GuideThe Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton

Warblers are among the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – The Red Faced Warbler

From pages 422-424 of The Warbler Guide:

The Red Faced Warbler can be easily identified by its red face, throat and upper breast. It also has a black cap that extends down the sides of its head to create “earflaps”, a white belly, and a long gray tail that is often flipped or wagged. It also has a short, thick bill and a single white wing bar with a blackish edge. The Red Faced Warbler is the only U.S. warbler with a bright red face.

The Red Faced Warbler

The Red Faced Warbler (Cardellina rubrifrons) perched on a branch. Photo Credit: Michael H. Bruce

While feeding, the Red Faced Warbler tends to be acrobatic and hang from branches. It has a long, slender shape, and its pale white rump is clearly visible during flight. This warbler has a limited range and altitude but, in Arizona and New Mexico, it tends to prefer mixed forests and steep terrain, typically above 2000m.

warblerThe Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton

Warblers are among the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Bird Fact Friday – Virginia’s Warbler

From pages 446-448 of The Warbler Guide:

Virginia’s warbler is recognizable from its grayish back and head, the variable yellow patch on its breast, and the chestnut crown patch which is often hidden on the top of its head. This type of warbler also has a long, thin, gray tail, along with grayish wings, without any brighter edging. This warbler has a limited range and habitat and can be found in brushy areas during migrations.

Virginia’s Warbler (Oreothlypis virginae) perched on a branch. Photo credit: Jim Burns

There is some variance between these warblers. For example, their chestnut crown is sometimes more easily seen. Additionally, the yellow on their breast can vary from almost none to extending from their throat to mid breast. Some of these patches are bright and stand out, while others have been patchy with gray on their sides.

warblerThe Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton

Warblers are among the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

 

 

Just in Time for Migration Season: The Warbler Guide

The Warbler GuideWarblers are among the most challenging birds to identify. But, as we enter the fall migration season, Princeton University Press has the perfect tool for identifying these beautiful birds: The Warbler Guide.

This helpful guide enables readers to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada, with more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

This is the perfect tool for birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. But fear not: we are pleased to offer some of these tools to print, laminate, and take with you as you set out on your own adventures. Below, we have eight different finder keys – you can also download them in a complete set as a PDF or JPG. Additionally, we have a tip sheet on identifying the age and sex of warblers, including those from the West Coast. Take these with you on your next birdwatching trip, and then check out the complete Warbler Guide for additional information and insights.

 

Face Quick Finder

Face Quick Finder PDF | JPG

45 Degree Quick Finder

45 Degree Quick Finder    PDF | JPG

East Fall Quick Finder

East Fall Quick Finder        PDF | JPG

East Spring Quick Finder

East Spring Quick Finder    PDF | JPG

Side Quick Finder

Side Quick Finder PDF | JPG

Undertails Quick Finder

Undertails Quick Finder     PDF | JPG

Underview Quick Finder

Underview Quick Finder     PDF | JPG

West Quick Finder

West Quick Finder PDF | JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Browse Our New Politics Catalog

Our new Politics catalog includes a comprehensive look at human rights laws and institutions, an examination of the role social media plays in our democracy, and a guide to forming opinions on some of the most controversial topics currently under the spotlight.

If you’ll be at APSA 2017 in San Francisco, please join us at Booth 511, or stop by any time to see our full range of politics titles and more.

 

Kathryn Sikkink makes the case that, yes, human rights work. Drawing on decades of research and fieldwork, this book provides a rigorous rebuttal to pessimistic doubts about human rights laws and institutions, demonstrating that change comes slowly and as the result of struggle. Evidence for Hope looks at how these essential advances can be supported and sustained for decades to come.

As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. In his revealing new book, Cass Sunstein shows how today’s Internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization, and even extremism—and what can be done about it. In addition, Sunstein proposes practical and legal changes to make the Internet friendlier to democratic deliberation.  Once finished, readers will understand why #Republic need not be an ironic term.

Let’s be honest, we’ve all expressed opinions about difficult hot-button issues without always thinking them through. With so much media spin, political polarization, and mistrust of institutions, it’s hard to know how to think about these tough challenges, much less what to do about them. One Nation Undecided takes on some of today’s thorniest issues and walks you through each one step-by-step, explaining what makes it so difficult to grapple with and enabling you to think smartly about it. No other book provides such a comprehensive, balanced, and accessible analysis of these urgent social controversies.

Bird Fact Friday – The Ringed Kingfisher

From page 154 of Wildlife of Ecuador:

The Ringed Kingfisher is one of the largest kingfishers in the world. The head, back, and tail are pale grayish blue; the belly (and chest in males) is rich rust; and a complete white collar encircles the neck. Females have a grayishblue breast band.

Ringed Kingfisher

A female Ringed Kingfisher (Megaceryle torquata) perched on a tree. Photo credit: Pablo Cervantes D, Tropical Birding Tours & Capturing Nature Tours

The Ringed Kingfisher’s loud, machine-gun-like call is often the first alert to its presence. It is common and widespread on both sides of the Andes, from lowlands to about 1,500m (4,920ft ), but requires medium-size to large bodies of water. It is often found around fish-farm pools on Andean slopes where rivers are narrower.

Andrés Vásquez Noboa
Photography by Pablo Cervantes Daza
Preview a Chapter

Mainland Ecuador’s spectacular wildlife makes it a magnet for nature tourists, but until now there hasn’t been a go-to, all-in-one guide geared to the general reader. With this handy and accessible guide, visitors now have everything they need to identify and enjoy the majority of birds and animals they are likely to see. Written and illustrated by two of Ecuador’s most experienced nature guides and photographers, this book covers more than 350 birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. It features over 400 stunning color photographs and includes a range map for each species, as well as a brief account of the country’s natural history and biogeography. With its extensive coverage, attractive and easy-to-use layout, beautiful photographs, and nontechnical text, this is an essential guide for anyone who wants to explore the natural wonders of Ecuador.

Bird Fact Friday — The Sword-billed Hummingbird

From page 134 of Wildlife of Ecuador:

The Sword-billed Hummingbird has the longest bill in proportion to its body of any bird on earth. Reaching up to 11cm (4.25in) long, the bill nearly equals the length of its large body. Males are solid green, and females are speckled white and green from throat to belly; both have a brown-bronzy shine on the head.

The Sword-billed Hummingbird

The Sword-billed Hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) mid-flight. Photo credit: Andres Vasquez, Tropical Birding Tour.

The species has coevolved with long tubular flowers to be their exclusive pollinator; it favors red Datura flowers and Purple Passionflower, or Taxo. Pleasingly, this stunner visits feeders and is fairly common throughout its range, which stretches along both slopes from 2,500m to about 3,400m (8,200–11,150ft). It is present close to small towns and in agricultural areas that grow its favored flowers as ornamentals.

Andrés Vásquez Noboa
Photography by Pablo Cervantes Daza
Preview a Chapter

Mainland Ecuador’s spectacular wildlife makes it a magnet for nature tourists, but until now there hasn’t been a go-to, all-in-one guide geared to the general reader. With this handy and accessible guide, visitors now have everything they need to identify and enjoy the majority of birds and animals they are likely to see. Written and illustrated by two of Ecuador’s most experienced nature guides and photographers, this book covers more than 350 birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. It features over 400 stunning color photographs and includes a range map for each species, as well as a brief account of the country’s natural history and biogeography. With its extensive coverage, attractive and easy-to-use layout, beautiful photographs, and nontechnical text, this is an essential guide for anyone who wants to explore the natural wonders of Ecuador.

PUP Celebrates The Total Eclipse with Three Giveaways

In celebration of the solar eclipse on August 21, Princeton University Press will be hosting three giveaways. If you’d like the chance to learn more about astronomy after next week’s solar event, you’re in luck. We’ll be giving away three of our favorite books via Goodreads:

These giveaways will run through Tuesday, August 22.

Welcome to the Universe Searching for the Oldest Stars The Cosmic Cocktail

Bird Fact Friday — All About the Red-masked Parakeet

From page 112 of Wildlife of Ecuador:

The Red-masked Parakeet is an attractive parakeet that shows a bold red mask with a contrasting white eye-ring. It is overall light olive green, and yellowish under the longish tail; in flight it shows red shoulders. It is resident in the drier lowland forests of the southwest, where common, and locally into the northwestern foothills and the upper subtropics of the far south.

The Red-masked Parakeet

The Red-masked Parakeet (Psittacara erythrogenys) perched on a branch.

It flies in noisy groups that give distinctive nasal calls, and it is known to visit fruit feeders in some locations. This is the main species of the parakeets of San Francisco, California (where introduced and afterward escaped) presented in the film The Wild Parrots of the Telegraph Hill.

Wildlife of Ecuador
Andrés Vásquez Noboa
Photography by Pablo Cervantes Daza
Preview a Chapter

Mainland Ecuador’s spectacular wildlife makes it a magnet for nature tourists, but until now there hasn’t been a go-to, all-in-one guide geared to the general reader. With this handy and accessible guide, visitors now have everything they need to identify and enjoy the majority of birds and animals they are likely to see. Written and illustrated by two of Ecuador’s most experienced nature guides and photographers, this book covers more than 350 birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. It features over 400 stunning color photographs and includes a range map for each species, as well as a brief account of the country’s natural history and biogeography. With its extensive coverage, attractive and easy-to-use layout, beautiful photographs, and nontechnical text, this is an essential guide for anyone who wants to explore the natural wonders of Ecuador.