Could India save Twitter? Misiek Piskorski discusses the future of social media with Yahoo! Finance

Harvard Business professor Misiek Piskorski is making the media rounds in New York to promote the publication of A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media. Here, with Yahoo! Finance, he discusses why Twitter needs to make a big play in India if it wants to stay relevant and competitive with other social media platforms like Facebook and Alibaba.

And here he discusses social media and the growth of Uber on Bloomberg TV:

 

bookjacket A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media
Mikolaj Jan Piskorski

Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95 | ISBN: 9780691153391
288 pp. | 6 x 9 | 2 halftones. 13 line illus. 9 tables.eBook | ISBN: 9781400850020 |

Reviews
Table of Contents

Sample the book:
Preface[PDF] pdf-icon
Chapter 1[PDF] pdf-icon

Watch this: Digiscoping with Clay and Sharon, Episode 5

I had a fantastic time at Space Coast in January and this episode finds Clay and Sharon exploring the nearby Viera Wetlands where they run into some frisky herons that pretty much dash Sharon’s hopes of working a little less “blue” in 2014.

Have you caught on to the series theme yet? For details on how to submit your guess and potentially win a Swarovski Spotting Scope, check out the BirdChick’s web site: http://www.birdchick.com/wp/2014/06/digiscoping-with-clay-and-sharon-episode-5-florida-birding/

 

Video Lectures – A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research

Author David A. Siegel recently released a series of video lectures to accompany the textbook A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research, co-authored with Will H. Moore. This video course is available for free via YouTube.

First watch this introduction:

Then delve into the various lecture playlists, starting with Lecture 1, which covers preliminaries and algebra review:

In case you are looking for a video on a specific topic, these are the subjects covered in the book. The lectures follow the same order.

 

bookjacket A Mathematics Course for Political and Social ResearchWill H. Moore & David A. Siegel

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the past week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
Liberalism: The Life of an Idea by Edmund Fawcett
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza’s Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age by Steven Nadler
Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon edited by Barbara Cassin. This translation edited by Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra & Michael Wood
Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

Ian Goldin explains “The Butterfly Defect”

Ian Goldin is director of the Oxford Martin School and professor of globalization and development at the University of Oxford. He has served as vice president of the World Bank and an advisor to President Nelson Mandela. His many books include Divided Nations, Globalization for Development, and Exceptional People (Princeton). His most recent book is The Butterfly Defect: How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It, co-authored with Mike Mariathasan, which you can sample for free here [PDF].

 

bookjacket The Butterfly Defect
How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It
Ian Goldin & Mike Mariathasan

Win your choice of books with our #springbooks giveaway

spring book contest

There are three ways to enter this giveaway:

1.) Leave a comment below with the title of the book you would most like to win.

2.) Tweet the title of the book you would like to win with the hashtag #springbooks.

3.) Send an email to blog@press.princeton.edu with the title of the book you would like to win.

 

This giveaway ends today at 5 PM, so make sure you submit your entry!

 

[Update: This giveaway has concluded and the winners have been notified, 6/5/14]

Q&A with Leif Richardson, co-author of Bumble Bees of North America

auricomus PHW

We’ve recently published a comprehensive identification guide to bumble bees of North America. One of the authors of that guide sat down with Margaret Roach at A Way to Garden to talk about misunderstandings when it comes to bumbles–how are they related to other social bees? do they make honey? what does aposematic mean?, and more. Enjoy this preview and then read the complete interview here.

At the end of the interview, there is an opportunity to enter and win a copy of the book, too. So make sure you scroll to the bottom.

 

Q. First, can we briefly place bees, and bumblebees, in the order of things?

A. Bees are in the insect order called Hymenoptera, which also includes ants, wasps, sawflies and a few miscellaneous taxa. The closest relatives of bees are wasps, and they diverged from them many millions of years ago.

Q. Yes, I read in the book that bees evolved from wasps 100 million years ago—though frankly, I can’t tell the two apart. Are there things I can be looking for?

A. What many people consider a bee is the furry thing that looks like a honeybee, but most people don’t know that there are many species of bees that closely resemble wasps.

In general, bees are more hairy than wasps, and the hairs are branched—all bees have branched hairs at least somewhere on their body. They can sometimes look very feathery under the microscope, just like a bird feather….The feathery hairs insulate, and also aid in the collection of pollen—or so is the theory.

In most bees, the females collect pollen to feed to their offspring, so they have a pollen-carrying structure. We call that a scopa—which is usually a morphological characteristic of the exoskeleton combined with hairs. If you think of what a honeybee’s leg looks like, you have that big, wide area on the hind leg—this is the scopa of a honeybee. It’s a concave area and then it has long hairs that arch over it, so the bee can pack pollen in there.

In other bees, the scopa may be on the underside of the abdomen or on the thorax, and some bees even carry pollen internally.

You won’t always be able to tell bees and wasps apart, but look for the pollen-carrying structures, and generally more hair on bees than on wasps.

Q. How many kinds of bees in North America? And how many are bumblebees by comparison?

A. There are only 46 species of bumblebees, which are in the genus Bombus, on the continent–but nearly 4,000 species of bees total, including the bumblebees, in the United States.

Most of the bees are not what you know as a bee—most of them are solitary in their lifestyle, and not social [like the familiar honeybees]. So the males and females mate, and then the females go off and lay their eggs in a nest, and provision it with pollen and nectar and seal it up and they’re done.

That’s as opposed to rearing their offspring, and then successive generations of a worker caste coming and later reproductive individuals, too, all in the same colony in the same year—that would be a social bee.

Continue reading this Q&A at A Way to Garden: http://awaytogarden.com/bumblebee-101-leif-richardson-win-new-field-guide/

Watch this: Digiscoping with Clay and Sharon, Episode 4

This week’s episode sees Sharon heading down to Rio Grande Valley to see a rare Amazon Kingfisher (“…an ABA Code 5 Rarity!!”). Along the way Clay and Sharon meet up with Greg Miller of The Big Year fame, spy on a Green Heron chick grabbing a snack and provide some instruction on how to deal with lighting while digiscoping.

Hopefully the theme of the series is becoming clearer. Remember if you figure it out, you can submit an entry to win a Swarovski STS Spotting Scope. All entries for the Swarovski STS spotting scope need to be emailed to digiscoping@birdchick.com and must include the answer, your first and last name, mailing address and phone number (in case I need to contact you regarding shipping). For more details about this contest, please visit the BirdChick’s web site.

ps — you may be interested to learn that the rabbits in this episode are stars in their own right. Sharon used to write Disapproving Rabbits blog which is worth checking out, even if it’s no longer active: http://www.disapprovingrabbits.com/

Katrina van Grouw & Unfeathered Friends featured on BBC Springwatch Unsprung

Sorry for the poor quality of this video, but it’s worth watching!

For more of Katrina’s Unfeathered Birds, please visit our slideshow of images from her book:

Capture

And if you wish to see Katrina’s art in person, you might like to attend this exhibition of her drawings at Buckinghamshire County Museum through September 27, 2014.

bookjacket

The Unfeathered Bird
Katrina van Grouw

Third Place for the 2013 BB/BTO Best Bird Book of the Year, British Birds and the British Trust for Ornithology
Honorable Mention for the 2013 PROSE Award in Biological Sciences, Association of American Publishers

Hardcover | 2013 | $49.95 / £34.95 | ISBN: 9780691151342

The Extreme Life of the Sea at TEDx Stanford

Read the complete story in The Extreme Life of the Sea by Steve and Anthony Palumbi.

Watch this: Digiscoping with Clay and Sharon, Episode 3

Spring has sprung in this latest installment of Digiscoping with Clay and Sharon. Sharon takes a break from her eagle-feeding duties to take Clay on in a digiduel. Along the way, she has lots of great advice on how to make the best of your own spotting scope, too. Enjoy, and see if you can spot Lawrence’s warbler!

Princeton University Press’s Weekly Best-Seller List

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline – 6th Week in a row!!
Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World by Gillen D’Arcy Wood
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton
Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle
The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter by Katherine Freese
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt