Call for Information: The Atlas of Migratory Connectivity for Birds of North America

We hope to publish the The Atlas of Migratory Connectivity for Birds of North America in 2016. The editorial team is asking for help in collecting data:

WOTH_ex1-231x300This book (and eventually the web based information) will fill an enormous knowledge gap about migratory connectivity as it is a mapping project that capitalizes largely on the historic band-recovery data from the USGS – Bird Banding Laboratory. After the recovery of literally millions and millions of bands, there has yet to be a comprehensive analysis and compilation of these data. The stories emerging for each species are spectacular, the connections between geographic places stunning, and the biological information priceless.

We want this atlas to be the most comprehensive source of information about migratory connectivity available. To make this possible, we will include all sources of connectivity information into each species’ map including sight recoveries of marked birds, stable isotope studies, geolocator, satellite and GSM telemetry work. Therefore we are reaching out to the ornithological community to request that you send us all information relating to migratory connectivity you might have or be aware of – published or unpublished on any species. Single data points are fine – we don’t want to miss anything! We will be collecting contributions through the end of 2014. All contributions included in the atlas will be properly acknowledged.

Please contact Amy Scarpignato with questions or to send your information. Thank you for considering this request and we look forward to hearing from you.

Peter P. Marra & Susan Haig

 

Reposted from http://www.migratoryconnectivityproject.org/atlas-of-migratory-connectivity-seeks-movement-data/

Be the first to read Zombies and Calculus — win an advance reading copy via Goodreads

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Zombies and Calculus by Colin Adams

Zombies and Calculus

by Colin Adams

Giveaway ends August 10, 2014.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to win

Celebrate the Red, White, and Blue… birds

We’re looking forward to the extended 4th of July weekend. To celebrate, we present our own version of red, white, and blue:

Untitled

These images are from The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds. Learn more here: http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9384.html

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the previous week

These are the best-selling books for the past week. Note — I’m using The Beetles of Eastern North America for the featured book because it outsold 1177 BC on cloth sales but does not have Kindle sales to boost its numbers.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
The Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur Evans
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton
Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It by Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media by Mikolaj Jan Piskorski

Watch This: Digiscoping with Clay and Sharon, The Penultimate Episode

In this episode, Clay and Sharon show off some digiscoping/iMovie techniques that allow you to watch birds in slow-motion. They also reveal a new adapter that connects your phone to your binoculars creating a super portable digiscope alternative!

There are lots of hints at the theme of the series in this episode, I think. Do you have it yet? If you think you know, make sure you send your guess in to the Birdchick at digiscoping@birdchick.com (be sure to include the answer, your first and last name, mailing address and phone number). for the complete contest details, please visit the Birdchick site.

ps — thanks for the shout out for The Warbler Guide!

Sexuality and the City–presenting the book trailer for There Goes the Gayborhood? by Amin Ghaziani

In There Goes the Gayborhood?, sociologist Amin Ghaziani shows why the rumors of the demise of gay neighborhoods like Boystown, Chelsea, the Castro District, and Dupont Circle are premature. Publishers Weekly says his “findings are not to be missed,” while Library Journal says the book represents, “a fascinating, rich view that is supported by up-to-date statistics.” This video gives a quick overview of what the book covers.

You can sample a free chapter here: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i10211.pdf

Is a “starvation diet” the cure for the crisis of the humanities?

Turner_PhilologyIt may seem strange, but as James Turner argues on the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Conversations blog, the modern humanities may not be at “death’s door,” as so many commentators imply. He says that a longer view–one that extends back to ancient times–tells us that what we are seeing is a reemergence of a generalist, philological approach to the humanities. Back to Philology indeed!

Turner details the “forgotten origins of the modern humanities,” in much greater detail in his new intellectual history, Philology. You can read a free chapter here [PDF].

Listen to the dire talk around colleges and universities, read op-eds and magazines, and you might think the humanities were in greater danger than the earth’s climate. In fact, despite the overheated rhetoric, the humanities are not at death’s door. Contemporary pressures will more likely push them into a new shape, even ultimately a healthier one.

That claim might seem bizarre. The proportion of college students majoring in the humanities has sunk to an all-time low. Students have turned their backs on art history and literature in favor of studies, like accounting and nursing, that lead directly to jobs. Governors like Florida’s Rick Scott have worked to undercut fields of study not tuned closely to employment. President Obama wants education to stress science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Funds for research in disciplines like history and linguistics are drying up. Congress has already slashed the budget of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and now Rep. Paul Ryan wants to kill it.

Analysts of higher education paint a more ambiguous picture. How many years ago you start counting—either majors or research dollars—determines how gloomy the humanities numbers look. And with more and more Americans going to college only to qualify themselves for work, most time-honored fields of study have taken a hit, not just the humanities. But even at a traditional, elite institution like Stanford, majors in humanities disciplines have fallen so low as to alarm faculty members into unprecedented missionary efforts.

To see how, paradoxically, a starvation diet may rejuvenate the humanities, it helps to take a long view. First of all, the humanities disciplines familiar in American higher education today did not even exist 200 years ago. Sure, in 1814 students learned the Greek and Latin languages, but no discipline called “classics” devoted itself to ancient Mediterranean civilizations. Yes, a college president in that era was likely to lecture on moral philosophy, but the broad range of topics covered by a modern philosophy department had no place in his institution.

Continue reading at The Chronicle of Higher Education web site: http://chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2014/06/09/yes-the-humanities-are-struggling-but-they-will-endure/

Could India save Twitter? Misiek Piskorski discusses the future of social media with Yahoo! Finance

Harvard Business professor Misiek Piskorski is making the media rounds in New York to promote the publication of A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media. Here, with Yahoo! Finance, he discusses why Twitter needs to make a big play in India if it wants to stay relevant and competitive with other social media platforms like Facebook and Alibaba.

And here he discusses social media and the growth of Uber on Bloomberg TV:

 

bookjacket A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media
Mikolaj Jan Piskorski

Hardcover | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95 | ISBN: 9780691153391
288 pp. | 6 x 9 | 2 halftones. 13 line illus. 9 tables.eBook | ISBN: 9781400850020 |

Reviews
Table of Contents

Sample the book:
Preface[PDF] pdf-icon
Chapter 1[PDF] pdf-icon

Watch this: Digiscoping with Clay and Sharon, Episode 5

I had a fantastic time at Space Coast in January and this episode finds Clay and Sharon exploring the nearby Viera Wetlands where they run into some frisky herons that pretty much dash Sharon’s hopes of working a little less “blue” in 2014.

Have you caught on to the series theme yet? For details on how to submit your guess and potentially win a Swarovski Spotting Scope, check out the BirdChick’s web site: http://www.birdchick.com/wp/2014/06/digiscoping-with-clay-and-sharon-episode-5-florida-birding/

 

Video Lectures – A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research

Author David A. Siegel recently released a series of video lectures to accompany the textbook A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research, co-authored with Will H. Moore. This video course is available for free via YouTube.

First watch this introduction:

Then delve into the various lecture playlists, starting with Lecture 1, which covers preliminaries and algebra review:

In case you are looking for a video on a specific topic, these are the subjects covered in the book. The lectures follow the same order.

 

bookjacket A Mathematics Course for Political and Social ResearchWill H. Moore & David A. Siegel

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the past week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
Liberalism: The Life of an Idea by Edmund Fawcett
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza’s Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age by Steven Nadler
Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon edited by Barbara Cassin. This translation edited by Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra & Michael Wood
Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

Ian Goldin explains “The Butterfly Defect”

Ian Goldin is director of the Oxford Martin School and professor of globalization and development at the University of Oxford. He has served as vice president of the World Bank and an advisor to President Nelson Mandela. His many books include Divided Nations, Globalization for Development, and Exceptional People (Princeton). His most recent book is The Butterfly Defect: How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It, co-authored with Mike Mariathasan, which you can sample for free here [PDF].

 

bookjacket The Butterfly Defect
How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It
Ian Goldin & Mike Mariathasan