“Governor Christie, Fidel Castro, and Hurricane Sandy,” a guest post by Stuart Schwartz

Hurricane Sandy on October 25, 2012 (Source: NASA, MODIS, LANCE, HDF File Data processed by Supportstorm: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sandy_Oct_25_2012_1530Z.jpg)

In late October, 2012 superstorm Sandy swept up from the Caribbean and pounded the Northeast. The damage was horrendous: 268 dead, $68 billion in property loss, the most expensive disaster in the United States after Hurricane Katrina. The images of President Obama and Republican Governor Christie walking the beaches of New Jersey became an icon of collaboration at a time when the country was frustrated by Washington’s seeming deadlock. Obama was swept into office the following month, and Christie’s popularity soared in the aftermath. Sandy was not the only reason for these political results, but exit polls confirmed that it was certainly a factor. It was a demonstration that government can effectively provide help in a time of crisis when those in authority do not hold government in contempt, to paraphrase Paul Krugman. It was a message that resonated with large segments of the public.

Governor Christie gives a no-nonsense update on the state of things, post Hurricane Sandy. Credit:  Alec Perkins. Source:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/alecperkins/8155687190/

Governor Christie gives a no-nonsense update on the state of things, post Hurricane Sandy.
Credit: Alec Perkins. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/alecperkins/8155687190/

But Hurricane Sandy had come in the midst of a scientific and political controversies about the effects of climate change on the intensity and frequency of cyclonic storms, and about the nature or role of government in protecting citizens from calamities. The response to Hurricane Sandy revealed the complex and sometimes contradictory responses to these debates. Governor Christie’s post-Sandy pleading for Federal aid moved some fellow Republicans to criticize him for “big government” solutions and excessive dependence on Washington, but before Sandy and thereafter on the question of global warming like many of his Republican colleagues he had voiced his own doubts on climate change, and emphasized that he had more immediate problems to solve than to debate such arcane issues. That seemingly “practical” approach contributed to his reelection, and in October of last year in his victory speech, the governor spoke of “the spirit of Sandy,” the sense of community and cooperation in problem solving that could become the way he would meet many kinds of political and social challenges.

Unknowingly, Governor Christie was repeating the arguments of Fidel Castro in a similar situation following the disastrous Hurricane Flora of 1963. Flora, the second deadliest storm in the history of the Atlantic had killed about 8,000 people in Haiti and Cuba. Castro at the time, embarrassed by the Missile crisis mobilized all of the institutions of Cuba in the relief effort. Cuba suffered over 1,200 death which was bad enough, but given the dimension of the storm, the government effort was a tremendous success. The successful cooperation and mobilization of society convinced him that this spirit of Flora could become the attitude in which all the country’s problems were met. Castro’s actions after Flora were used to justify the effectiveness of the Revolution and, in fact, Cuba subsequently became a model for disaster mitigation and preparation, but whatever the immediate political benefits, overtime Castro’s speeches also became “greener,”and like many leaders in the Caribbean, he began to emphasize the need to take global warming and the rise of the oceans seriously.

For the most part, that has not been the case in New Jersey. The problem is that separation of practical issues from long-term issues like global warming is short-sighted. In Sandy, for example, the New Jersey Transit Corporation, basing its decision on past experience failed to move its rolling stock to high ground and as a result suffered a loss of a quarter of its trains and $150 million in damages. New York’s MTA under Governor Cuomo suffered far less because he had taken climate change as a reality and had taken necessary precautions. Both governors had been handicapped, however, by the fact that FEMA funding had been so reduced prior to Sandy that the shoreline maps of areas of possible flooding of New York and New Jersey were decades out of date.

Castro’s experience following hurricane Flora made him an advocate of strong government action in response to natural disasters, but it had also made him responsive to the challenges of environmental change. It remains unclear if Governor Christie who is looking forward to 2016 has learned a similar lesson, and more importantly, if he could make that message appealing to his political party, the leadership of which continues to deny scientific evidence of human caused climate change, or suggests that even if it does exist, there is little that can be done about it. That position combined with a neo-liberal argument for weakening financial support for the public sector, lowering investments in infrastructure, and the dismantling of central authority that has gained much support since the 1980s, and it raises the question for Governor Christie and the rest of us if the “spirit of Sandy” that he so passionately invoked will be enough to confront the challenges of climate change.


Stuart B. Schwartz is the George Burton Adams Professor of History and chair of the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies at Yale University. His many books include All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World and Sea of Storms. A History of Caribbean Hurricanes from Columbus to Katrina (forthcoming January 2015).

#AAUPWeek Seminar: Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

 

About this program:

Collaborations spearheaded by university and academic presses with research libraries, scholars, and other universities around the world are a vital part of publishing today. It is these alliances that keep university presses at the forefront of literature, theory, research, and ideas, making them stewards of modern thought.

In this discussion, Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education is joined by three panelists who have spearheaded innovative collaborations that cross the boundaries of nations, institutions, and disciplines: Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications at National Academies Press and also President of the AAUP, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, director of the University of North Texas Press.

The projects to be discussed are:
• Princeton University Press and Caltech’s Einstein Papers Project provides the first complete picture of Albert Einstein’s massive written legacy. http://www.einstein.caltech.edu
• National Academy Press’s Academy Scope is a visualization of all of the titles that are available on NAP.edu, allowing readers to browse through the reports of the National Academies by topic area and seeing relationships between titles. http://www.nap.edu/academy-scope
• University of North Texas Press teams up with the University of North Texas Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program and the University of Magallanes in Chile to introduce Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology.  This project is the result of a decade of research conducted by scientist associated with the Omora Ethnobotanical Park in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile. https://untpress.unt.edu/catalog/3564

#UPWeek: Press Director Peter Dougherty participating in Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing today at 1 PM EST

Join the Association of American University Presses today, November 12, 2014, from 1pm-2pm ET, in celebrating scholarly presses by highlighting three exemplary collaborative projects in an online panel moderated by Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education.

The session will be presented on Google+: http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

Ms. Howard will be joined by Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications at National Academies Press and AAUP President, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, Director of the University of North Texas Press to discuss the projects they spearheaded for their respective presses. These three projects illustrate some of the best work being produced in publishing today and open the door to talk about other collaborations within science and the humanities.

  • Princeton University Press and Caltech’s Einstein Papers Project provides the first complete picture of Albert Einstein’s massive written legacy.
  • National Academies Press’s Academy Scope is a visualization of all of the reports that are available on NAP.edu, allowing readers to browse through the reports of the National Academies by topic area and seeing relationships between titles.
  • University of North Texas Press, University of North Texas Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program, and University of Magallanes in Chile’s Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology project is the result of a decade of research conducted by scientists associated with the Omora Ethnobotanical Park in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile.

 

November 12, 2014, 1pm-2pm ET

Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

Presented on Google+

http://bit.ly/ZUCKr1

#UPWeek

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis by Ben S. Bernanke
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
More Than You Wanted to Know: The Failure of Mandated Disclosure by Omri Ben-Shahar & Carl E. Schneider
The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World by Adrienne Mayor
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method by G. Polya
The Age of the Vikings Anders Winroth
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter by Richard P. Feynman

Enter to win a copy of Alan Turing: The Enigma, the Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game

Hodges_AlanTuring movie tie inOn November 28, The Imitation Game will open in limited release. In the film, Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the charge to crack the German Enigma Code that helped the Allies win WWII. Turing went on to assist with the development of computers at the University of Manchester after the war, but was prosecuted by the UK government in 1952 for homosexual acts which the country deemed illegal. The film is inspired by the award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges.

To celebrate the release of the film, Princeton University Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the book with a movie still cover and new material from the author that brings the story current through Turing’s pardon by the Queen. Enter our giveaway below to win a copy of the new edition of the book AND a $25.00 Fandango gift certificate.

This giveaway will run from November 11 through November 24 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada, aged 18 and older. No purchase is necessary. If you prefer to enter via email, please send a note to blog@press.princeton.edu. Please see complete terms and conditions below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Using the filter feature on The Warbler Guide App

Scott Whittle and Tom Stephenson revolutionized how birders study, find, hear, and see warblers with their acclaimed book The Warbler Guide. Now they have their sights set on bringing all the breakthrough features from the book, plus a host of app-only features, to your iPhone® and iPad® in the Warbler Guide App.

In this video, Scott introduces the app’s innovative filter function that allows users to narrow their search results by color, facial marks, wing bands, and song. Intuitive, visual, and interactive, this system allows users to find the bird they are seeing in the field quickly and easily.

The Warbler Guide App will be available in December 2014.


bookjacket Warbler Guide App
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
APP | Spring 2015 | $12.99 | ISBN: 9781400849901

Princeton University Press announces selections for The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2014

The output of math writing has steadily increased in volume and quality with major articles appearing in math journals like Notices of the American Mathematical Society, Communications of the ACM, and Math Horizons; general-interest publications like Slate, American Scientist and Foreign Affairs; and still more in disciplinary journals like Physics Today, The American Statistician or Chance. Editor Mircea Pitici reads them all and selects the best of the best for this annual series. The Best Writing on Mathematics is an expertly curated annual celebration of important math writing (or speaking, as you will see below).

Among the many highlights of the 2014 edition are Kenneth Cukier and Viktor Mayer-Schönberger explaining “The Rise of Big Data” and its impact on the world; Sarah-Marie Belcastro describing her “Adventures in Mathematical Knitting;” Tanya Khovanova solving “Conway’s Wizards;” Jordan Ellenberg on a recent breakthrough in the study of prime numbers; Brian Hayes on “Crinkly Curves;” and Keith Devlin describing what makes a video game good for learning mathematics and showing why many games fall short of that goal. John Conway presents examples of arithmetical statements that are almost certainly true but likely unprovable; Carlo Séquin explores, compares, and illustrates distinct types of one-sided surfaces known as Klein bottles; and Stephen Pollard argues that mathematical practice, thinking, and experience transcend the utilitarian value of mathematics. Also included here, for the first time in print, is the text of a talk given by Francis Edward Su on the occasion of receiving the 2013 Haimo Award for Distinguished Teaching.

We hope you will join us in celebrating these excellent articles and speeches from the previous year!

Complete list of selections for

The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2014

(presented in the order of the Table of Contents)

Mathematics and the Good Life, Stephen Pollard (originally appearing in Philosophia Mathematica)

The Rise of Big Data: How It’s Changing the Way We Think about the World, Kenneth Cukier and Viktor Mayer-Schönberger (originally appearing in Foreign Affairs)

Conway’s Wizards, Tanya Khovanova (originally appearing on The Mathematical Intelligencer)

On Unsettleable Arithmetical Problems, John H. Conway (originally appearing in The American Mathematical Monthly)

Crinkly Curves, Brian Hayes (originally appearing in American Scientist)

Why Do We Perceive Logarithmically? Lav R. Varshney and John Z. Sun (originally appearing in Significance)

The Music of Math Games, Keith Devlin (originally appearing in American Scientist)

The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra for Artists, Bahman Kalantari and Bruce Torrence (originally appearing in Math Horizons)

The Arts–Digitized, Quantified, and Analyzed, Nicole Lazar (originally appearing in Chance)

On the Number of Klein Bottle Types, Carlo H. Séquin (originally appearing in Journal of Mathematics and the Arts)

Adventures in Mathematical Knitting, Sarah-Marie Belcastro (originally appearing in American Scientist)

The Mathematics of Fountain Design: A Multiple-Centers Activity, Marshall Gordon (originally appearing in Teaching Mathematics and Its Applications)

Food for (Mathematical) Thought, Penelope Dunham (originally appearing in PRIMUS)

Wondering about Wonder in Mathematics, Dov Zazkis and Rina Zazkis (originally appearing in Wonder-full)

The Lesson of Grace in Teaching, Francis Edward Su (originally appearing on Mathematical Yawp)

Generic Proving: Reflections on Scope and Method, Uri Leron and Orit Zaslavsky (originally appearing in For the Learning of Mathematics)

Extreme Proofs I: The Irrationality of 2, John H. Conway and Joseph Shipman (originally appearing in Mathematical Intelligencer)

Stuck in the Middle: Cauchy’s Intermediate Value Theorem and the History of Analytic Rigor, Michael J. Barany (originally appearing in Notices of the AMS)

Plato, Poincaré, and the Enchanted Dodecahedron: Is the Universe Shaped Like the Poincaré Homology Sphere? Lawrence Brenton (originally appearing in Math Horizons)

Computing with Real Numbers, from Archimedes to Turing and Beyond, Mark Braverman (originally appearing in Communications of the ACM)

Chaos at Fifty, Adilson E. Motter and David K. Campbell (originally appearing in Physics Today)

Twenty-Five Analogies for Explaining Statistical Concepts, Roberto Behar, Pere Grima, and Lluís Marco-Almagro (originally appearing in The American Statistician)

College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage, David Gale and Lloyd S. Shapley (originally appearing in The American Mathematical Monthly)

The Beauty of Bounded Gaps, Jordan Ellenberg (originally appearing on Slate)

We welcome suggestions, comments, and materials for consideration for future volumes. To provide feedback, please contact editor Mircea Pitici.


bookjacket

The Best Writing on Mathematics 2014
Edited by Mircea Pitici

American Pulp — so much more than cheap books

rabinowitz

Ron Slate reviews American Pulp by Paula Rabinowitz (seen above with part of her collection of pulp paperbacks at the Twin Cities Book Festival on October 11, 2014) at his blog On the Seawall:

Rabinowitz devotes chapters to the exposure of GI’s to paperbacks, the scandalous novels of Ann Petry (the racial, ethnic, and sexual obsessions of small-town white America), Borges and pulps, “uncovering lesbian pulp,” the portrayals of the Holocaust and the new age of The Bomb, and censorship. She writes with briskness and acuity. The historical richness of the material is leavened by a lively, broadminded, and humane sense of her culture. But most important, she writes with affection for the profound effects of her subject. Her own early responses to the genre are palpable: “The paperback, indeed, literature tout court, is suffused with desire and love, of and for sisters and parents, imagined lovers, real boyfriends. It is a token and expression of what cannot be contained, a tangible object that, in its totality, offers entrance into the infinitude of time and memory and all one might want collapsed into the hours spent alone with it.”

Read more: http://www.ronslate.com/new_titles_ren_char_paula_rabinowitz_and_alexander_kluge


bookjacket American Pulp
How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street
Paula Rabinowitz

#NewBooks from Princeton University Press

Books released during the week of October 27, 2014
Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film <i>The Imitation Game</i><br>Andrew Hodges<br>With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author Alan Turing: The Enigma:
The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game
Andrew Hodges
With a foreword by Douglas Hofstadter and a new preface by the author


“One of the finest scientific biographies ever written.”–Jim Holt, New Yorker
Alan Turing's Systems of Logic: The Princeton Thesis<br>Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel Alan Turing’s Systems of Logic:
The Princeton Thesis
Edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel


“This book presents the story of Turing’s work at Princeton University and includes a facsimile of his doctoral dissertation, ‘Systems of Logic Based on Ordinals,’ which he completed in 1936. The author includes a detailed history of Turing’s work in computer science and the attempts to ground the field in formal logic.”–Mathematics Teacher
One Hundred Semesters: My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way<br>William M. Chace One Hundred Semesters:
My Adventures as Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way
William M. Chace


“Chace here recounts a young man’s maturation and offers insight into the challenges of university administration. . . . Chace is a gifted storyteller, appealingly honest in analyzing what he did well and where he went wrong.”–Evelyn Beck, Library Journal
Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide<br>Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg<br>With photography by Geoff Jones Birds of Australia:
A Photographic Guide
Iain Campbell, Sam Woods & Nick Leseberg
With photography by Geoff Jones


Birds of Australia is an excellent book. The text is comprehensive, the content is effectively organized and researched, and the scholarship is sound. The photographic plates are of a very high quality.”–Peter S. Lansley, senior ecologist, Brett Lane & Associates
The History of American Higher Education: Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II<br>Roger L. Geiger The History of American Higher Education:
Learning and Culture from the Founding to World War II
Roger L. Geiger


“An encyclopedic history of American colleges and universities. . . . A well-researched, detailed tome.”–Kirkus Reviews

Win a copy of Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game and tickets to see the movie

Hodges_AlanTuring movie tie inOn November 21, The Imitation Game will open in limited release. In the film, Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the charge to crack the German Enigma Code that helped the Allies win WWII. Turing went on to assist with the development of computers at the University of Manchester after the war, but was prosecuted by the UK government in 1952 for homosexual acts which the country deemed illegal. The film is inspired by the award-winning biography Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges.

To celebrate the release of the film, Princeton University Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new edition of the book with a movie still cover and new material from the author that brings the story current through Turing’s pardon by the Queen. Enter our giveaway below to win a copy of the new edition of the book AND a $25.00 Fandango gift certificate.

This giveaway will run from November 11 through November 24 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada, aged 18 and older. No purchase is necessary. If you prefer to enter via email, please send a note to blog@press.princeton.edu. Please see complete terms and conditions below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Princeton University Press’s #NewBooks for this week

Books released during the week of October 14, 2014
Economic Interdependence and War<br>Dale C. Copeland Economic Interdependence and War
Dale C. Copeland

“A landmark study, Economic Interdependence and War presents a novel and compelling argument about trade expectations and the prospects for peace and war among the great powers. This well-written and accessible book buttresses its argument with an extraordinarily valuable historical analysis of great-power interactions from the 1790s to the present day, and a superior intellectual engagement of the quantitative literature.”–Joseph Grieco, Duke University

Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America<br>Robyn Muncy Relentless Reformer
Josephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America
Robyn Muncy

“Josephine Roche finally has her due, thanks to Robyn Muncy’s sparkling political biography. Policewoman and business owner, labor-relations and public-health pioneer, political insider and female outsider, Roche emerges warts and all as a slayer of inequality. More than an exercise in recovery, Relentless Reformer challenges conventional wisdom on the detrimental impact of private welfare on public programs as it charts the persistence of a democratic, state-centric progressivism over the course of the twentieth century.”–Eileen Boris, Hull Professor of Feminist Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Clear and Simple as the Truth: Writing Classic Prose (Second Edition) by Francis-Noël Thomas & Mark Turner
The Age of the Vikings Anders Winroth
The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World by Adrienne Mayor
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: The Complete First Edition by Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm, translated and edited by Jack Zipes
Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All around Us by Oscar E. Fernandez
Green: The History of a Color>/a> by Michel Pastoureau