Browse Our New Sociology 2017 Catalog

Our new Sociology catalog includes an essential guide to social science research in the digital age, an inside look at blue-collar trades turned hipster crafts, and an examination of the commercialization of far right culture in Germany.

If you’ll be at ASA 2017 in Montreal, please join us for wine and light refreshments:

Booth 721
3pm
Sunday, August 13th

Or stop by any time to see our full range of sociology titles and more.

Digital technology has the potential to revolutionize social research, data gathering, and analysis. In Bit by Bit, Matthew J. Salganik presents a comprehensive guide to the principles of social research in the digital age. Essential reading for anyone hoping to master the new techniques enabled by fast-developing digital technologies.

Bit by Bit, by Matthew J. Salganik

Richard E. Ocejo draws on multiple years of participant-observation in a fascinating look at four blue-collar trades that have acquired a new cachet in the modern urban economy: bartending, distilling, barbering, and butchering. Join him as he delves deep into the lives and culture of these Masters of Craft.

Ocejo

Recent years have seen a resurgence of far right politics in Europe, manifesting in the increasing presence of clothing and other products displaying overt or coded anti-Semitic, racist, and nationalist symbology. Cynthia Miller-Idriss examines the normalization and commercialization of far right ideology in The Extreme Gone Mainstream.

Miller-Idriss

Meet Your New Neighbors…in the House of Government

Built on the banks of the river Moscow, the House of Government was home to nearly three thousand residents, drawn largely from the government workers of Soviet Russia. Including cinemas, theaters, exercise facilities, creches, and multiple canteens and restaurants, the House of Government epitomized the aspirations of collective plenty that fueled socialist revolution. But what was the experience of living in this colossal building? Imagine yourself a young apparatchik from the provinces moving into an apartment in this prestigious block: let me introduce just a few of your neighbors, from the dozens who appear in Yuri Slezkine’s House of Government.

“Welcome to the House of Government. You must be doing well for yourself to be getting an apartment here, it’s mostly the top government workers here, some from the nomenklatura even. Yes, it’s a big place…thousands living here…two theatres and a cinema, would you believe?…but I pride myself on knowing everyone who lives here. You’ll recognize some of their faces anyway, I’m sure. Like him for instance, that’s Koltsov the journalist…you must read his stuff in Pravda? Seems like he never misses an issue. The young lad with him is his son, well, his adopted son anyway, all the way from Germany, but you wouldn’t know it to speak to him. Talks like a Moscow boy, born and bred. We have quite a few writers…Arosev, for instance…no, I started one once but I couldn’t finish it. It was a bit over my head, to be honest. Same with Voronsky…what was that magazine he ran? Red Virgin Soil? I like something with a good story and people you can believe in. Anyway, he’s up in 357.

Mikhail Koltsov

Mikhail Koltsov

“Ah, comrade Ivanov, let me introduce a new tenant, just moving in on the second floor…Ivanov’s a good man, one of the real Old Bolsheviks, you’d know he was in the streets in 1917, not like some people I could mention, telling you they were in the Winter Palace when they were really hiding under their beds. No airs and graces with Ivanov, he’s done an honest day’s work in his time. “The Baker,” they call him. The woman he’s talking to now is Elena Dimitrievna Stasova, they know each other from old times…she’s with the Comintern now, spent quite a while in Germany working with our comrades there.

“Him? Why, that’s Mironov from the GPU…I could tell you stories about him that would turn your blood cold. They say he caught thousands of traitors when he was in the Ukraine, and not one lived to tell the tale. Shocking to think there are so many out there trying to bring the country down. Must be tough work too…can’t say I’d like to do it myself. I mean, a traitor is a traitor, don’t get me wrong, but still…you’d never think it to see him going out of an evening with his wife. Now she’s something…always dressed to the nines, never a hair out of place. Foreign…Greek, maybe? Definitely not a Russian name, that’s for sure.

Agnessa Argiropulo and Sergei Mironov

Agnessa Argiropulo and Sergei Mironov

“Here we are, this is your floor. There’s nobody on your left at the moment…bit of a sad story really, she was given a one-way ticket to Kazakhstan, and not for any reason that anyone could make out. Still, there must have been something…you don’t wind up stuck on a farm a hundred miles from Almaty for nothing, do you? Tania Miagkova, her name was. Big family on the other side, the Podvoiskys…yes, it is that Podvoisky, Nikolai Ilich from the war. He has some peculiar ideas, let me tell you. Why, one day I stopped by to fix something, knocked on the door, walked in…the whole family was sitting there with not a stitch on them! In December! “It’s good for the health,” says he. I got an eyeful that day. Well, make yourself at home. If you need anything, you know where to find me.”

The Podvoisky family

The Podvoisky family (fully clothed)

Browse Our New Biology 2017-2018 Catalog

In our Biology 2017-2018 catalog you will find a host of new books, from an in depth look at the complex relationship between one of our most beautiful butterflies and a family of poisonous plants to a fascinating exploration of the role of beauty and attraction in sexual selection.

If you will be at ESA in Portland, we will be in booth 703. Join us for a reception with wine and light refreshments to celebrate our new titles and meet our authors at 5pm, Tuesday, August 8th. Or stop by any time to check out our full range of titles in biology and related fields.

In Monarchs and Milkweed, Anurag Agrawal draws on more than a decade of research to bring an unsurpassed account of the coevolution of the monarch butterfly and the milkweed. Monarchs lay their eggs exclusively on milkweed plants, on which they feed in the early stages of their lives as caterpillars. The milkweed has evolved a battery of defensive characteristics to reduce the depredations of monarch caterpillars; in turn, monarchs have evolved their own means of overcoming these defenses. Learn about this evolutionary arms race, and much more besides in Monarchs and Milkweed.

Monarch

In his theory of sexual selection, Darwin argued that animals have “a taste for the beautiful” that governs their attraction to potential mates. But in what does this taste reside? How does it affect the evolution of physical characteristics in animals? What is beautiful to a frog or a peahen? In A Taste for the Beautiful, Michael Ryan delves deeply into the question of sexual attraction and argues that beauty is in the brain of the beholder.

A Taste for the Beautiful by Michael Ryan

Few people know Darwin’s life and work as well as his biographer, Janet Browne (Charles Darwin: Voyaging, Charles Darwin: The Power of Place), making her the perfect editor for The Quotable Darwin. Drawing on the full range of Darwin’s writings, including his letters to friends and family, and his private notebooks, The Quotable Darwin is an unforgettable picture of the man and his thought in his own words.

The Quotable Darwin by Janet Browne

Find these books and many more in our Biology 2017-2018 catalog.

Which Heretic are You?

Steven and Ben Nadler’s Heretics is a graphic novel account of the seventeenth-century thinkers who challenged the authority of church and king—risking excommunication, imprisonment, and even execution—to lay the foundations of modern philosophy and science. But which of these radical philosophers would you have been? Take our quiz and find out:

Do you believe that God is:

When a tree falls in a forest, do you think that:

When one body gravitates toward another, is it because:

Do you believe mind and body are:

Are miracles possible?

What is the source of a political sovereign’s authority?

Is this the best of all possible worlds?

What happens when you die?

Big Pacific – Passionate Pacific

Watch the fourth episode of Big Pacific, “Passionate Pacific,” on your local PBS station at 8pm Eastern, Wednesday, July 12th. The companion book is available now from Princeton University Press.

The largest ocean on planet Earth, the vast and unfathomable Pacific is inhabited by an extraordinary wealth and diversity of animal life. This multitude of species is united by a common drive—the need to reproduce—but that drive is expressed in ways as different as the creatures themselves.

Clownfish and Anemone

A clownfish lurks amid the fronds of a poisonous Anemone.

The home life of the clownfish is unusual—these small, brightly colored fish live out their lives amid the fronds of sea anemones, exuding a mucus-like covering that protects them from the anemone’s poisonous sting. Up to a dozen clownfish may live in the embrace of a single anemone, protected from predators by their host’s venom. In return, the clownfish consume parasites that could harm the anemone, and their movements as they swim help waft food towards the stationary anemone. All clownfish are born male, but within each of these miniature colonies, one of these males will become dominant and develop into a female. In turn, this female will select one and only one of the remaining males as a mate, leaving the rest to live out their lives in cloistered celibacy. The chosen male has the tasks of fertilizing the hundreds of eggs released by the female when she spawns and of guarding them without respite until they hatch ten days later.

Grunion run

Grunion carpet the shore during their mating run.

The reproductive life of the Gulf grunion is more hazardous and dramatic, played out in the liminal zone where the ocean meets the shore in the Gulf of California. Riding the high tide produced by the full moon, a wave of female grunion pitches onto the beach, digging into the sand to find a place to lay their eggs. That wave is followed in quick succession by the males, who wrap themselves around their half-buried mates to fertilize the eggs. Though the process takes only minutes, the fish quickly returning to the water to avoid suffocation, it leaves the grunion vulnerable. The beach, densely carpeted with silvery bodies, is an open buffet for predatory birds such as gulls, but the sheer mass of grunion ensures that plenty survive. The grunion hatchlings remain buried in the sand until the next full moon tide allows them to make their way back into the ocean.

Seahorses with tails entwined

Pot-bellied seahorses entwine their tails for a mating dance.

The Pot-bellied seahorse prefers a more relaxed courtship. Having identified a potential mate, the male seahorse brightens his stomach pouch to a vivid yellow. The female responds with her own display of color, and the two entwine their tails for an underwater dance that can last for up to twenty minutes as the seahorses pirouette and twirl around the warm, shallow waters in which they live. At the consummation of the dance, the two belly-to-belly, the female squirts her eggs into an opening in the male’s pouch and the two separate. Once the eggs hatch, the male carries his hundreds of offspring in his pouch for up to a month, before releasing them to float away.

Big Pacific – Voracious Pacific

Watch the third episode of Big Pacific, “Voracious Pacific,” on your local PBS station at 8pm Eastern, Wednesday, July 5th. The companion book is available now from Princeton University Press.

The inhabitants of the Pacific Ocean are united by the need to feed, the constant quest for sustenance. Many of these inhabitants feed on each other—only a handful of the largest and most dangerous are free of the threat of becoming somebody else’s lunch. Any evolutionary adaptation that makes it easier to acquire food confers an advantage in the battle for survival, and the Pacific showcases many remarkable adaptations and specializations.

Double-crested cormorant

A double-crested cormorant dries its wings after a dive.

The double-crested cormorant dives for fish, plummeting out of the air to plunge into shallow coastal waters. The light, hollow bones that make it easy for other birds to soar would make it difficult for the cormorant to remain submerged; instead it has evolved with heavier bones, lower body fat, and feathers that absorb water, allowing it to swim underwater for up to thirty seconds at a time, propelled by its wings and webbed feet. After a dive, the now waterlogged bird will need to dry its feathers before it can fly again, and they can be easily spotted on rocky shores, standing with wings outstretched to dry in the sun. These cormorants are so well adapted to hunting underwater that their young will sometimes take to the water even before learning to fly.

Peppered moray eel

A peppered moray eel slithers across the rocks in search of crabs

If the Pacific is home to birds that hunt underwater, it is only fitting that there should also be fish that hunt on land. Moray eels have long been known as effective predators, possessed of powerful jaws from which few victims escape. Morays typically lurk in crevices or holes in underwater reefs, waiting for an unsuspecting meal to swim by, but the peppered moray takes a more proactive approach. These eels will slither out of the water at low tide, dipping in and out of rock pools to avoid suffocation, searching for crabs. The peppered moray is the only member of the moray family known to leave the water in this way.

Nomura's jellyfish

Nomura’s jellyfish is one of the largest jellyfish, but feeds though hundreds of tiny mouths.

Paradoxically, some of the largest denizens of the ocean feed on the smallest prey. The blue whale is the largest animal on the planet – a full-grown blue whale can reach a hundred feet in length and two hundred tonnes in weight—but it feeds on krill, small crustaceans barely an inch in length, filtering vast draughts of water through baleen plates in its mouth to trap the tiny krill. Manta rays feed on smaller fry still, sweeping up plankton as they glide through the water on wing-like fins that can span 23 feet in width. But perhaps the most extraordinary is the Nomura’s jellyfish. These giant jellyfish start life as a polyp the size of a pinhead with a mouth barely a millimeter wide but in the space of a year they grow to some six feet in diameter and more than 400 pounds in weight. Their mouths do not grow with them; instead the jellyfish develops hundreds of tiny mouths, allowing them to filter an Olympic swimming pool of water for plankton every day. Voracious indeed!

See dazzling footage of these animals and many more in the next episode of Big Pacific.

Big Pacific – Violent Pacific

Watch the second episode of Big Pacific, “Violent Pacific,” on your local PBS station at 8pm Eastern, Wednesday, June 28th. The companion book is now available from Princeton University Press.

Drowned Forest

The stumps of these spruce trees are remnants of the forest drowned by the 1700 earthquake

Although its name suggests calm and tranquility, the Pacific Ocean is riven by powerful natural forces: violent tropical storms, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes are common occurrences across this mighty ocean. The ocean sits within the Ring of Fire, a zone of intense tectonic activity where multiple plates meet, grinding and driving against each other with sometimes cataclysmic results. Running in a horseshoe shape from New Zealand along the western Pacific to the Aleutians and back down the western coast of the Americas, the Ring of Fire is home to 90% of the world’s earthquakes. All but three of the 25 largest volcanic eruptions in the last 12000 years have occurred in the Ring of Fire, the eruptions of Tambora and Krakatoa among them. The power and destructiveness of these eruptions and quakes is monumental—in 1700 an earthquake in Cascadia caused the coastline to drop by as much as ten feet in a matter of seconds, instantly submerging wide swathes of forest beneath the water. The shockwave took only ten hours to cross the thousands of miles of ocean to reach the coast of Japan in the form of a massive tsunami.

humpback whales

The long pectoral fins of the humpback whale can be used as weapons by battling males.

The life of animals in the Pacific can be no less violent. The struggle for survival manifests both as competition within species, and between species. It is easy to think of humpback whales as placid animals, drifting through the ocean in search of the minuscule plankton on which they feed. Their mournful song is a cliché of New Age relaxation tapes. But competition between male humpbacks over females often turns to battle: during their “heat run” contending males will swipe each other with their long pectoral fins, ram each other, and even breach the surface of the ocean to land on each other. Despite the huge bulk of these animals, mature males weighing in at up to 36 tonnes, they can move surprisingly quickly, reaching speeds of 18 miles an hour. The impact of their collisions is comparable to that of fully-loaded eighteen wheeler trucks. The victorious male earns the right to mate with the female.

Shedao Island pit viper

A Shedao Island pit viper claims another victim

But the archetypal struggle in the animal kingdom is that between predator and prey. Evolutionary adaption has made the predators at the top of the food chain near-perfect killers. The Shedao Island pit viper is found only on one tiny island in the Yellow Sea off the coast of China, where it has so effectively dominated the ecosystem that it is estimated that there is one viper for every square meter of land on the island. The sole source of food for these snakes is migratory birds: twice a year, in spring and fall, birds use Shedao Island as a staging post on the journey to and from their breeding grounds in Siberia. These two six-week periods are the only point in the year at which the viper eats. Motionless and near invisible on the branches of a tree, the viper waits for a bird to land. Its strike is near instantaneous and its victim quickly succumbs to the snake’s powerful venom. The viper will slowly swallow its meal whole, then seek another; it must consume several birds to survive the long fast between migrations.

Discover more of the violent side of the Pacific in Wednesday’s episode of Big Pacific.

Big Pacific – Mysterious Pacific

Watch the first episode of Big Pacific, “Mysterious Pacific,” tonight on PBS at 8pm Eastern. The companion book is now available from Princeton University Press.

The scale of the Pacific Ocean is almost incomprehensible. This single body of water covers a greater area than all six continents combined; its deepest point, the Marianas Trench, lies far further below the surface than the summit of Everest stands above it. Much of this vast realm is unexplored, inaccessible to the human eye, and even the shallow waters with which we are familiar are home to many strange and mysterious things.

Horseshoe Crab

The horseshoe crab – one of the planet’s “living fossils”

Among them are species that predate humankind, and indeed all mammals, by hundreds of millions of years. The four species of horseshoe crabs are the last remaining members of a family that first appears in the fossil record some 450 million years ago. Horseshoe crabs are not true crabs, being more closely related to arachnids such as spiders and scorpions. Despite their long tenure on this planet, horseshoe crab populations are in decline. Pollution, overfishing, and development along the Pacific shorelines where they mate are all taking a toll on these living fossils, and efforts are underway to protect them and improve their survival rate.

Nan Madol

The abandoned city of Nan Madol

Even the short span of human history presents enigmas. Off the eastern shore of the Micronesian island of Pohnpei lies the magnificent complex of Nan Madol. Comprised of over ninety artificial islets linked by a network of canals, Nan Madol is thought to have been home to the political and religious elite of Pohnpei. Construction of the complex was a monumental task: some 750,000 tonnes of black basalt were transported from the far side of Pohnpei to build monumental structures with walls up to 49 feet in height and 16 feet in thickness. More remarkable still, it seems to have been achieved without even the benefit of simple machines such as pulleys or levers—the building methods used remain unknown. Despite the enormous efforts that went into the building of Nan Madol in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the site was abandoned in the sixteenth century after the Saudeleur dynasty was toppled by invasion from without. Today it is a UNESCO heritage site.

Pufferfish circle

The tiny white spotted pufferfish at the center of his circle

Recent years have brought to light a smaller but no less fascinating construction project. In 1995 divers off the coast of Japan noticed unusual circular patterns in the seabed. Formed too perfectly to be the work of chance, these circles featured concentric rings of sand with furrows radiating from the central point like the spokes of a bicycle wheel. It was not until nearly twenty years later, in 2013, that the mysterious architect of these circles was identified. Despite the scale of the circles, up to six feet in diameter, they are the work of a species of small pufferfish, only a few inches in length. The male pufferfish works diligently, fanning the sand with his fins or using his body to shovel it aside, in order to construct his circle, which he then maintains carefully in the hope of attracting a mate. Even if he is successful in doing so, the female pufferfish does not stick around to admire his homemaking skills—having laid her eggs, she quickly departs leaving the male to care for and defend them.

With the vast depths of the Pacific largely unexplored, we can be sure that it has many more mysteries to offer us.

Watch the trailer to learn more.

Browse Our New History of Science & History of Knowledge 2017 Catalog

Our new History of Science and History of Knowledge catalog includes a fascinating account of the spread of Einstein’s theory of relativity, a timeless defense of the value of basic research, and a new history of archaeology from Eric Cline.

In The Road to Relativity, Hanoch Gutfreund and Jürgen Renn explored Einstein’s original paper, “The Foundation of General Relativity”. Gutfreund and Renn’s new book, The Formative Years of Relativity, follows the spread and reception of Einstein’s theory, focusing in particular on the Princeton lectures that formed the basis for his 1922 book, The Meaning of Relativity. Drawing on Einstein’s letters and contemporary documents, many of which are reproduced within, The Formative Years of Relativity provides invaluable context for perhaps the most important scientific breakthrough of the twentieth century.

The Formative Years of Relativity by Hanoch Gutfreund and Jurgen Renn

In 1939, Abraham Flexner, founding director of the Institute for Advanced Study, wrote an essay on The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge arguing that basic research into fundamental questions has always driven scientific innovation and warning against focusing too narrowly on immediately “useful” knowledge. In a time where pressure is constantly increasing on researchers to apply themselves to practical problems, we are pleased to bring Flexner’s enduring essay back into print, accompanied by a new essay from the current director of the Institute he founded, Robbert Dijkgraaf.

Use

We can think of no better person to present the history of archaeology than Eric H. Cline, author of 1177 B.C. Cline’s Three Stones Make a Wall gives a vivid account of the legendary excavations and the formidable personalities involved in archaeology’s development from amateur’s pastime to cutting edge science. As capable with a trowel as he is with a pen, Cline draws on his three decades of experience on digs to bring the how and the why of archaeology to the page alongside the history.

Cline Jacket

Find these and many more new titles in our History of Science & History of Knowledge 2017 catalog.

Fighting for Land in the City of Dreams

City of Dreams - Jerald PodairOn Friday, May 8th, 1959, in front of a waiting audience of newspaper journalists and television cameras, the City of Los Angeles commenced the eviction of the Arechiga family from their two homes in Chavez Ravine. Sheriff’s deputies broke down the barricaded doors and dragged the Arechigas from the buildings before bulldozers moved in to demolish them. Local television stations showed live footage of the eviction and demolition. It was the latest and most dramatic episode in the tangled story of the Brooklyn Dodgers move to Los Angeles.

The Arechigas were among the last remnants of an established Mexican-American community in Chavez Ravine. The semi-rural canyon had provided homes for Mexican-American families for decades, but its location just north of downtown Los Angeles made it an obvious target for redevelopment following the Second World War, as the city struggled to house a rapidly growing population. Initially the Ravine was slated for an enormous public housing project, planned for over 3,300 units, in buildings designed by modernist architects Richard Neutra and Robert Alexander. The City Housing Authority moved rapidly to relocate residents, using federal funds to acquire the land via eminent domain. However, McCarthy-era Los Angeles proved unsympathetic to these “socialist” plans, and in 1953 newly-elected mayor Norris Poulson made good on his election promises to block the Chavez Ravine development.

Through the mid-’50s, Chavez Ravine was a ghost town, with only a handful of residents clinging on. The Arechigas continued to fight the condemnation orders against their homes, arguing that the abandonment of the housing project rendered the orders void, and attempted to pay taxes on the property. The City, for its part, declined the payments, and allowed the case to continue through the courts.

In 1957 the situation changed as a group of LA politicians and administrators, Poulson among them, pitched Los Angeles to Brooklyn Dodgers-owner Walter O’Malley as a new home for the team. O’Malley considered a new, substantially larger stadium essential to the Dodgers’ future, but the land on which to build it was not to be had in New York. Could Chavez Ravine offer a solution? O’Malley found himself embroiled in a complex political and legal battle between rival factions that was ultimately decided by the California Supreme Court in January 1959. The land could be used to build his stadium. But the land was not yet empty, and the massive publicity around the eviction of the Arechigas threatened to derail the stadium plan.

Four days after the eviction, there was a stunning new development. An article in the Mirror News newspaper revealed that the Arechiga family owned no less than seven other homes. Public opinion rapidly turned against the Arechigas. A few days previously they had been pitied as penniless citizens made homeless by a heartless administration; now they were pilloried as grasping obstructionists determined to wring a higher price for their land from the taxpayer. Their battle was lost; the Arechigas did not accept the condemnation payment on the property until 1962, but they could only look on as construction began on Dodger Stadium.


Read the full story of the Dodgers’ move to Los Angeles, and the battles surrounding the construction of Dodger Stadium, in Jerald Podair’s City of Dreams, available now from Princeton University Press.

Browse Our New Art & Architecture 2017 Catalog

Our new Art & Architecture catalog includes a major new work by Hans Belting, a stunning reinterpretation of the paintings of Bosch and Bruegel, and the latest in Michel Pastoureau’s series on color, Red.

If you will be at the CAA meeting in New York next week, please stop by booth 609 where we will have all these books on display and you can pick up a copy of the catalog in person. In addition, we will be holding a special event on the Thursday evening:

Reception and Book Signing
Princeton University Press, Booth 609
Thursday, February 16, 2017
5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Princeton University Press celebrates the publication of the two most recent volumes in the A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts series, Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life, by Joseph Leo Koerner, and Chinese Painting and its Audiences, by Craig Clunas. Please join us for wine and cheese. Joseph Koerner will be signing copies of Bosch and Bruegel. The A. W. Mellon Lectures are published in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Following his acclaimed books Black and Green, Michel Pastoureau digs into the history of a color with powerful cultural associations, from warfare and religion to love and passion: Red. Through February we will be giving away copies of Red on Goodreads, Twitter and Instagram: visit our Giveaways page for further details on how you can enter the giveaway.

Red by Michel Pastoureau

Based on his lecture series for the  2008 A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Joseph Leo Koerner’s Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life analyses the links between the great Dutch painters Hieronymous Bosch and Pieter Bruegel and demonstrates the emergence of Bruegel’s scenes of everyday life from Bosch’s hellish phantasmagorias.

Bosch and Bruegel, by Joseph Leo Koerner

In Face and Mask, Hans Belting embarks on a full cultural history and anthropology of the face across the full breadth of human civilization, and explores the paradox by which, despite ever increasing verisimilitude, representations of the face inevitably become a hollow signifier, the mask.

Face and Mask, by Hans Belting

Find these titles and many more in our Art & Architecture 2017 catalog.

Browse our Economics & Finance 2017 Catalog

Our Economics & Finance 2017 catalog features new books from some of the most distinguished names in the field, including Kenneth S. Rogoff (co-author of This Time is Different) and Nobel Prize-winner Jean Tirole.

Browse the catalog below, or visit our stand at ASSA this weekend (1/6–1/8) in Chicago and pick up a copy in person: we’ll be at booths 107 and 109 with a full range of our books across the social sciences, we hope to see you there!

In The Curse of Cash, Kenneth S. Rogoff presents the startling argument that our economies are awash with too much cash. For most of us electronic transactions are increasingly supplanting cash, yet more cash is in circulation than ever before, much of it in large denomination bills that are rarely used in routine transactions. Instead, Rogoff argues, these large bills sustain a wide range of illegal activities ranging from tax evasion to terrorism, and we would be better off without them. Is it time to abolish the $100 bill?

Rogoff

Following his receipt of the Nobel Prize in 2014, Jean Tirole found himself cast into the role of public intellectual, regularly asked to comment on the issues of the day. In Economics for the Common Good Tirole takes to the role with gusto, issuing a clarion call to his fellow economists to join him in engaging in public debate, and applying his formidable knowledge to major issues ranging from unemployment to climate change and the digital revolution.

Economics for the Common Good by Jean Tirole

Economic inequality is an increasingly central and divisive issue in public life, but how can it be tackled? A sweeping survey covering human civilization since the Stone Age, Walter Scheidel’s The Great Leveler demonstrates that increased economic equality has typically followed in the wake of violent catastrophe: wars, revolutions, the collapse of states, and virulent plagues. Are peace and stability inexorably linked with economic inequality?

Scheidel Great Leveler jacket

Find out about these titles and many more in our Economics & Finance 2017 catalog.