Richard H. Thaler wins the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, 2017

Princeton, NJ, October 9, 2017—Upon today’s announcement that Dr. Richard H. Thaler is the winner of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2017, Princeton University Press extends hearty congratulations to the celebrated economist.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Science recognizes Dr. Thaler “for his contributions to behavioural economics.”

Dr. Thaler is the Charles R. Walgreen Distinguished Service Professor of Economics and Behavioral Science at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business where he directs the Center for Decision Research. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research where he codirects the Behavioral Economics Project. Dr. Thaler’s research bridges the gap between psychology and economics. He is considered a pioneer in the fields of behavioral economics and finance.

Princeton University Press is deeply gratified to be the publisher of Dr. Thaler’s The Winner’s Curse: Paradoxes and Anomalies of Economic Life (1994) and Advances in Behavioral Finance, Volume II (2005).

According to Joe Jackson, Senior Economics Editor at Princeton University Press, “Dr. Thaler’s is an edifying story of how economics adapts and, over time, can come to embrace new perspectives that at first might seem at odds with the whole tradition, but that stand the test of extensive scrutiny and experimentation and end up broadly changing the field.  Princeton University Press is proud to have played a minor but relatively early part in that story by publishing the paperback of The Winner’s Curse, shortly after it was published in hardcover by the Free Press in 1992, which is still in print today.”

Since 1905, Princeton University Press has remained committed to publishing global thought leaders in the economic sciences and beyond. We are honored to count Dr. Thaler’s work as a cornerstone of this legacy.

Richard Thaler joins a number of esteemed PUP authors who have won the Nobel Prize in Economics, among them Angus Deaton, Jean Tirole, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert J. Shiller, Thomas J. Sargent, Peter A. Diamond, Elinor Ostrom, Edmund Phelps, Robert J. Aumann, George Akerlof, Robert Engle, John Nash, and Alvin Roth.

Vickie Kearn kicks off Global Math Week

October 10 – 17 marks the first ever Global Math Week. This is exciting for many reasons and if you go to the official website, you’ll find that there are already 736,546—and counting— reasons there. One more: PUP will be celebrating with a series of posts from some of our most fascinating math authors, so check this space tomorrow for the first, on ciphers, by Craig Bauer. Global Math Week provides a purposeful opportunity to have a global math conversation with your friends, colleagues, students, and family.

Mathematics is for everyone, as evidenced in the launch of Exploding Dots, which James Tanton brilliantly demonstrates at the link above. It is a mathematical story that looks at math in a new way, from grade school arithmetic, all the way to infinite sums and on to unsolved problems that are still stumping our brightest mathematicians. Best of all, you can ace this and no longer say “math is hard”, “math is boring”, or “I hate math”.

Vickie Kearn visits the Great Wall during her trip to our new office in Beijing

I personally started celebrating early as I traveled to Beijing in August to attend the Beijing International Book Fair. I met with the mathematics editors at a dozen different publishers to discuss Chinese editions of our math books. Although we did not speak the same language, we had no trouble communicating. We all knew what a differential equation is and a picture in a book of a driverless car caused lots of hand clapping. I was thrilled to be presented with the first Chinese editions of two books written by Elias Stein (Real Analysis and Complex Analysis) from the editor at China Machine Press. Although I love getting announcements from our rights department that one of our math books is being translated into Chinese, Japanese, German, French, etc., there is nothing like the thrill I had of meeting the people who love math as much as I do and who actually make our books come to life for people all over the world.

Because Princeton University Press now has offices in Oxford and Beijing, in addition to Princeton, and because I go to many conferences each year, I am fortunate to travel internationally and experience global math firsthand. No matter where you live, it is possible to share experiences through doing math. I urge you to visit the Global Math Project website and learn how to do math(s) in a global way.

Check back tomorrow for the start of our PUP blog series on what doing math globally means to our authors. Find someone who says they don’t like math and tell them your global math story.

Read like a Nobel Prize-winning physicist

This morning Princeton University Press was thrilled to congratulate PUP author and celebrated physicist Kip Thorne on being a co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2017. Dr. Thorne’s research has focused on Einstein’s general theory of relativity and astrophysics, with emphasis on relativistic stars, black holes, and especially gravitational waves. The latter observation, made in September 2015, validated a key prediction of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Princeton University Press is honored to be the publisher of Dr. Thorne’s Modern Classical Physics, co-authored with Roger Blandford, and the new hardback edition of the renowned classic, Gravitation, co-authored with Charles Misner and the late John Wheeler, forthcoming this fall.

Over the years, we’ve published several Nobel winners, including:

  • Einstein
  • Richard Feynman (QED)
  • P.W. Anderson (the classic and controversial Theory of Superconductivity in the High-Tc Cuprates)
  • Paul Dirac (General Theory of Relativity)
  • Werner Heisenberg (Encounters with Einstein)

Interested in learning more about physics yourself? We put together the ultimate Nobel reading list. Click the graphic for links to each book.

PUP congratulates Kip S. Thorne, joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics

New Books Gravitation and Modern Classical Physics Publishing in October 2017

Princeton, NJ, October 3, 2017—Upon today’s announcement that Dr. Kip S. Thorne is the joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2017, Princeton University Press would like to extend hearty congratulations to the celebrated physicist.

The Royal Swedish Academy recognizes Dr. Thorne, along with Rainer Weiss and Barry C. Barish, for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves”.

Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Thorne has focused his research on Einstein’s general theory of relativity and on astrophysics, with emphasis on relativistic stars, black holes, and especially gravitational waves. The latter observation, made in September 2015, validated a key prediction of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

Princeton University Press is honored to be the publisher of Dr. Thorne’s Modern Classical Physics, co-authored with Roger Blandford, and the new hardback edition of the renowned classic, Gravitation, co-authored with Charles Misner and the late John Wheeler, publishing in October 2017.

According to Christie Henry, director of Princeton University Press, “Dr. Thorne’s creativity and brilliance have been as grounding to Princeton University Press’s publishing program in the physical sciences as gravitation is to the human experience.  His recently released Princeton University Press contributions, Gravitation and Modern Classical Physics, are vital to our mission of illuminating spheres of knowledge to advance and enrich the human conversation, and today we celebrate his commitment to science with the Nobel committee and readers across the universe.”

Since the publication of Albert Einstein’s The Meaning of Relativity in 1922, Princeton University Press has remained committed to publishing global thought leaders in the sciences and beyond. We are honored to count Dr. Thorne’s work as part of this legacy.

Thorne

For more information, please contact:

Julia Haav, Assistant Publicity Director

Julia_Haav@press.princeton.edu, 609.258.2831

 

A. James McAdams on Vanguard of the Revolution

Vanguard of the Revolution is a sweeping history of one of the most significant political institutions of the modern world. The communist party was a revolutionary idea long before its supporters came to power. A. James McAdams argues that the rise and fall of communism can be understood only by taking into account the origins and evolution of this compelling idea. He shows how the leaders of parties in countries as diverse as the Soviet Union, China, Germany, Yugoslavia, Cuba, and North Korea adapted the original ideas of revolutionaries like Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin to profoundly different social and cultural settings. The first comprehensive political history of the communist party, Vanguard of the Revolution is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand world communism and the captivating idea that gave it life. Read on to learn more about the origins and evolution of the communist party in Russia.

What led you to write a book about the communist party?

My initial motivation was that I couldn’t find any systematic political histories of the party. I felt that scholars and other interested readers would benefit from a broad comparative study that accounted for both this institution’s tremendous staying-power over the past century and then its swift collapse by the early 1990s. The communist party was more than a fleeting political organization. It was the principal rival to the other, prevailing form of party rule in modern times—liberal democracy. During the past century, over a billion and a half people were ruled by communist parties, roughly 38 percent of the world’s population.

I was also motivated by a factor that was missing in my discipline. Political scientists have written an impressive number of books on party behavior in both developing and advanced democracies. But they have generally neglected the communist party. This may be due to the assumption that that all communist parties have adhered to a stereotyped definition of “Leninism,” i.e., an organization characterized by dictatorial practices, rigid hierarchies, and rampant brutality. Yet, as I show in my book, the communist party took multiple forms over its long history, just like liberal-democratic parties did in the West. Although all communist parties had certain features in common—especially the conviction that the progressive march of history was on their side—they also differed in significant ways. Just look at the variation in the former Soviet Union, China, and Cuba. This was not only true of dictatorships. There were notable differences among the communist parties that competed in national and local elections in the West, such as the French and Italian communist parties.

Communist parties also assumed different identities over time. Lenin’s Bolsheviks were vastly different from what the communist party became under Joseph Stalin. Likewise, Nikita Khrushchev’s and Leonid Brezhnev’s conceptions of party leadership were different as well. One of the most important things Mikhail Gorbachev did when he came to power was to attempt to transform the party according to a highly idealized vision of Leninist rule. Yet, his efforts to reform the idea of the party inadvertently resulted in the institution’s total loss of legitimacy.

What do you mean by referring to “the global idea” of the party in the subtitle of Vanguard of the Revolution?

I am a big believer in the role of ideas in driving human behavior. You can’t understand the communist party’s lasting appeal unless you recognize that the party was an idea before it took the form of a fully fleshed-out organization. When Karl Marx wrote the Communist Manifesto in 1848, he did not trouble himself with the issue of party organization. He was so convinced about the immediacy of the proletarian revolution that he assumed that the party would simply materialize as the prophetic voice of the working class. Over the following century, his ideas about the struggle between the oppressed and the oppressed and the inevitable victory of good over evil galvanized the emotions of revolutionaries in as disparate locations as Hungary, the United States, Poland, Yugoslavia, and China. Although the conditions these radicals faced were very different from those that Marx encountered in England and Germany, his and his successors’ ideas gave them the confidence that they, too, would be victorious.

Of course, I don’t mean to attribute the longevity of communist parties to ideas alone. As I emphasize in Vanguard of the Revolution, a political order based solely on the idea of constantly revolutionizing society would explode. At one point or another, all communist leaders recognized that their movements would not survive without effective organizations. Yet these parties would not have lasted if they had lacked the ideas to motivate their followers. It’s when you put ideas and organizations together that you get a viable institution, one that lasts a long time.

What is so exciting about the communist party is that it was a truly global institution. Long before the advent of the internet and social media, a combination of factors—advances in communications media, repeated military conflicts, and social upheaval—made it possible for communists and other sympathetic radicals to bring the idea of an international revolution to life. These revolutionaries were not only focused on their own countries, they drew upon a vast network of personal ties to spread the good word about communism around the world.

Why were so many party members willing to sacrifice their lives—or the lives of others, including comrades and family members—in defense of their cause?

This question haunts everyone who seeks to make sense of the history of world communism.  Certainly one motivating factor was fear. During Stalin’s Terror or Mao’s Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, if you failed to denounce someone who was accused of being a “counterrevolutionary,” you would be accused of the same crime. Another factor was opportunism. For many party cadres, these times presented opportunities for moving up the social and political ladder.

But the factor I consider the most important—and disturbing—was the rigid psychology of many of the true-believers. As writers like Arthur Koestler, Wolfgang Leonhard, and George Orwell, have beautifully captured in their accounts, there was an intoxicating element of messianism in these movements. Party cadres were prepared to do normally unthinkable things to others because they truly believed that they were on the right side of history. As we know about all messianic movements, the more deeply such believers are immersed in their cause, the more they are inclined to engage in cognitive denial. In the face of all contradictory evidence, they can be convinced that people they have known their entire lives are spies, saboteurs, and “wreckers.”

Your book covers an extraordinary number of communist parties over long periods. How did you become interested in the study of communism?

Well, I began with East Germany. I was studying German at the Free University in West Berlin in 1973, and went to East Berlin on a regular basis. Crossing through the Berlin Wall was always an adventure. When I stepped into the Eastern side of the city, I couldn’t help but wonder what it was like to live under communism. As I passed people on the street, they would invariably look at my shoes and my jeans—both signs of capitalist affluence. Clearly, they were wondering what it was like to live in the West.

Once I had become familiar with one communist country, I couldn’t resist the temptation to visit all of them! Everywhere I went, whether to Cuba, Poland, or China, I found intriguing similarities and differences among their regimes. One of my goals in writing Vanguard of the Revolution was to account for some of these differences.

What is the most unusual communist country you’ve visited?

It would have to be North Korea, although strictly speaking, its government no longer has the formal attributes of a communist regime. When one sees pictures of North Korea, it looks like a very strange place. But when you get there, the country seems even more unfathomable. There are statues of the “eternal leader” Kim Il-sung everywhere, colorful mosaics of the “dear son,” Kim Jong-il, and endless monuments to heroic military battles. When I was there in 2006, I witnessed tens of thousands of parading students, jubilantly preparing for mass games to celebrate their leaders’ achievements. The word “bizarre” does not begin to capture the fervor you experience.

In building this anti-Disneyland, the North Korean government has been remarkably successful in blocking the flow of information into and out of the country. The first thing the police take from you when you arrive at Pyongyang International Airport is your cell phone. As a result of this enforced isolation, the country’s citizens have an almost childlike understanding of the outside world. They also know next to nothing about conditions in their own country. Our tour guide practically fell over from disbelief when I told her that Kim Jong-il had three sons. Now that one of those sons, Kim Jong-un, holds the reins of power, she undoubtedly reveres him as a divine presence who will safeguard her needs.

If you could go back in time, what aspect of the communist party’s history would you like to experience?

I would like to have been a “fly on the wall” during the early battles among Leftist radicals that led to the formation of communist parties, such as the founding congress of the International Workingmen’s Association (the so-called First International) in 1864 or the French socialists’ Congress of Tours in 1920. These were fantastically dramatic events. Both the passions and the animosities that they generated contributed substantially to the character of communist parties in subsequent decades. They also played a huge role in the terrible tragedies that were to come to the movement in later years.

Did writing Vanguard of the Revolution present any special challenges?

The biggest challenge was to get inside the heads of the people I was describing. Why were so many party members willing to sacrifice their lives—or the lives of others, their comrades-in-battle, and family members—in defense of their cause?

During my travels to Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, and Asia, this was the first question I posed to long-time communists, people who had become disaffected with liberal democracy and capitalism at an early age and had experienced the tumult of war and other upheavals. Invariably, they convinced me that they were not opportunists; they sincerely believed that they were building a better world.

My challenge was to imagine what these and other communists were thinking and feeling as they lived their lives forward. To satisfy my curiosity, I not only familiarized with the relevant secondary literature.  I also read a lot of biographies, interviews, and even popular literature. These revolutionaries’ ideas directly reflected the cultures of which they were a part.

You call your study of the communist party a post-mortem. Why should we care today about the life and death of this particular institution?

If we interpret the party’s history in the right way, we can gain insight into the vitality of our own political system. The communist parties that ruled countries like the Soviet Union and East Germany didn’t come out of the blue. They were the product of the distinct political and social conditions of the twentieth century—war, economic collapse, and revolution. Strictly speaking, we will never again see this specific type of party. Even the few parties that are still labelled as communist, such as those in China, North Korea, Vietnam, and Cuba, long ago shed the features that identified them with the Leninist tradition. However, this does not mean that we won’t encounter other militant parties that are equally opposed to liberal democracy. It all depends on having sufficiently turbulent conditions that allow incipient rabble-rousers and demagogues to convince their followers that the prevailing order should be replaced. We see signs of the potential for such extremist movements in the rise of right-wing populism in Europe today. Vladimir Putin’s perversion of Russian democracy is a good example of this trend.  Alas, even parties in the US are not immune to this authoritarian temptation.

McAdamsA. James McAdams is the William M. Scholl Professor of International Affairs and director of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame. His many books include Judging the Past in Unified Germany and Germany Divided: From the Wall to Reunification (Princeton). He lives in South Bend, Indiana.

Princeton University Press seeks Director of Marketing

Princeton University Press is keen to welcome applicants for a new Director of Marketing, to join and lead a remarkable team of sales, publicity, marketing, and e-publishing staff. PUP is a dynamic, mission based institution committed to bringing the very best trade, academic, and text books to readers and conversations around the world. A recently opened office in Beijing and a remarkable team in Europe offer a unique opportunity to initiate and lead teams and programs at a global scale. The Director of Marketing collaborates directly with the Press Director, and plays a vital role in all strategic initiatives, working with all departments at the Press, from acquisitions to design to production in addition to direct reports.

Responsibilities include:

  • Provide vision, leadership and management of the Press’ global marketing, sales, digital publishing, and publicity departments and establishes strategic direction for these functions. This includes staying abreast of industry trends, crafting and implementing innovative programs and experiments to help insure that the press maintains its leadership position within the university press community.
  • Maintain a leadership role in the development and execution of marketing, sales, and publicity plans in order to meet and exceed the Press’ fiscal year financial targets, cultivate author loyalty, and build upon the press reputation of publishing excellence.
  • Serve as a member of the management team, advising the Director and executive management of the Press on a myriad of strategic issues related to the conduct of our business and mission.
  • Recruit, manage, and develop talented, creative, and qualified personnel (current staff of 33) who understand the mission and objectives of the Press while keeping them motivated and engaged in the conduct of their work. Exercise excellent judgment, foster a culture of creativity and experimentation, and help managers prioritize their work and establish their goals, develop and manage their programs and budgets, continually improve in their professional development, and maintain a collaborative and innovative spirit.
  • Collaborate closely with other departments in helping to set Press priorities and procedures, establishing the seasonal list planning, and takes a critical role in the integration of a new title management and distribution and fulfillment system.
  • In partnership with Press staff in international offices, lead the Press in innovating global initiatives in marketing, sales, and publicity, particularly in Europe and China.
  • Provide vision and leadership role in the Press’ digital publishing sales initiatives and work closely with the senior management of the Press informing them of all major developments and makes strategic recommendations to the Director and senior management team.
  • Work closely with Sales Director and major business partners (including Amazon.com, Two Rivers/Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and Barnes & Noble), in order to maintain strong relationships and negotiate favorable terms.

Qualifications:

  • A minimum of 10 years publishing experience with demonstrated excellence in marketing, publicity, or sales leadership positions.
  • Strength and experience in building and leading teams, and developing staff.
  • Strategic thinker with experience creating and implementing strategic change.
  • Extensive experience in trade and scholarly publishing, sales, and publicity – domestically and internationally preferred. Experience in digital publishing and textbook publishing preferred. Experience in social media and digital marketing preferred.
  • Ability to communicate effectively in all types of business situations and cultures – internal and external. Experience leading committees and chairing meetings.
  • Understands and fully supports the fundamental mission statement of the Press.

Interested candidates should send a cover letter with salary requirements and resumé to: resumes@press.princeton.edu.

Note that applications will only be accepted from Tuesday, September 19th to Friday, October 6th.

Only finalists will be contacted. For more information on Princeton University Press, visit http://press.princeton.edu/.

EOE/AA/M/F/D/V

Princeton University Press is an equal opportunity employer. All applicants will be considered for employment without attention to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, veteran or disability status.

The ampersand: everyone’s favorite glyph

September 8th is national ampersand day. That’s right, the ampersand, a quirky little character that’s practical, pretty and beloved by typographers and book-nerds alike, has a day of its own. Technically a ligature of “e” & “t” (et in Latin, meaning and), the ampersand is a visual stunner that certainly deserves the shout-out. We asked our own designers and creative director to comment on their favorite ampersand fonts, and they were all too eager to oblige.

“Poetica, by Adobe type designer Robert Slimbach, is a typophile’s dream. Based on chancery script handwriting of the Italian Renaissance, this gorgeous typeface has a profusion of ampersands: an extremely impressive 59 variations! Check out those swash-y ones in the bottom row!” – Chris Ferrante, designer and ampersand aficionado

“My favorite kinds of ampersands tend to be the ones that have a really high contrast between the thick and thin strokes. My current favorite would have to be Bauer Bodoni Std 2.” – Jess Massabrook, designer

“I love ampersands. They remind me of treble clefs and Dali’s mustache—playful and lyrical. My favorite is Caslon 540 Italic because its curves and tentacle-like squiggles are simultaneously elegant and fun.” – Maria Lindenfeldar, Creative Director

Want more ampersands? Check out our “PUP ampersands in the wild” post on Instagram from earlier today and this great article on Spoon Graphics on the sexiest ampersands.

Welcome to our new director, Christie Henry

Just before Labor Day, we warmly welcomed Christie Henry, formerly of University of Chicago Press, as she began her tenure as the new director of Princeton University Press. Her distinguished list at Chicago and extensive knowledge of the landscape of university press publishing are incredible assets as she leads the PUP team into the next era. We’re thrilled to have her on board.

Recently The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Rachel Toor interviewed Christie as part of their Scholars Talk Writing series. In it she discusses the relationships that drive success in the world of books, the job of an editorial director, the financial landscape of academic publishing, how to bring scholarship to a general audience, publishing challenges, and more:

That Christie Henry has left the University of Chicago Press after 24 years to take over as director of Princeton University Press is a boon for her and her new colleagues. For the staff at Chicago — and its authors, including me — well, it’s been bittersweet.

As editorial director for the sciences, social sciences, and reference at Chicago, Christie was involved with my book project from its inception, providing enthusiastic support and smart suggestions. My editor, Mary Laur, credits her former boss with teaching her how not to be a “crappy editor.” (Mary is, in fact, anything but.) At Chicago, Christie published a distinguished list that included The Deep: The Extraordinary Creatures of the Abyss, The Oldest Living Things In the World, How Animals Grieve, and Relentless Evolution.

When I got the advance copy of my new book, it came gift-wrapped in University of Chicago Press paper. Then Mary emailed asking me for the name of an administrator at my university so she could send a copy of my book announcing its publication. Mary credits Christie Henry with those nice touches. That made Christie a good candidate for the Scholars Talk Writing series, for both personal and professional reasons.

Let’s talk about some of these publishing lagniappes.

Henry: Truly, I can take no credit for the gift wrap. I think it came with the founding of the press in 1891! The experience of wrapping a book to me is a moment of reflection — a poignant reminder that we occasionally do need to pause, to celebrate what we have accomplished, and to then regift. The return of a published book to an author is a gift of collaboration. That final published form needs to be celebrated by all of those who touched its pages, its endpapers, and I think the wrapping paper symbolizes that celebration.

And for the additional copies we gift, this ensures that the celebration is not too localized. It takes more than a proverbial village to make books, including the support of administrators and peers. We all know of the disruption books can cause in an author’s life. In the sciences, I found that, because journal articles are the tools of professional evolution and credentialing, department chairs and deans were often unaware of book-length authorial endeavors. I felt it necessary to share the successes on behalf of the authors, and ensure their administrators were aware of their accomplishments.

Read the full piece at The Chronicle of Higher Education here. You can find another great interview with Christie in Dartmouth Alumni Magazine.

Scheidel, Lo, and Tirole longlisted for FT & McKinsey Business Books of the Year

Scheidel Great Leveler jacketThe longlist for the Financial Times & McKinsey Business Books of the Year Award was announced on August 14th, and we’re thrilled that once again the list of finalists includes several Princeton University Press books:

The Great Leveler by Walter Scheidel, the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world.

Economics for the Common Good by French winner of the Nobel prize in economics, Jean Tirole, a passionate manifesto for a world in which economics, far from being a “dismal science,” is a positive force for the common good.

Adaptive Markets by Andrew Lo, a new, evolutionary explanation of markets and investor behavior.

Economics for the Common Good by Jean TiroleThe shortlist for this highly distinguished prize will be announced on September 19th. The winner of the Business Book of the Year Award will be awarded £30,000, and £10,000 will be awarded to each of the remaining shortlisted books.

Take a look at all the finalists for this honor during the past decade here.

LoA heartfelt congratulations to our authors.

 

 

 

 

Princeton University Press awarded the Lyman H. Butterfield Award

At the 2017 annual meeting of the Association for Documentary Editing held in Buffalo, New York, Princeton University Press was awarded the Lyman H. Butterfield Award, given annually by the Association since 1985 “to an individual, project, or institution for recent contributions in the areas of documentary publication, teaching, and service.” The award is granted in memoriam of Lyman Butterfield, whose editing career included contributions to The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, the editing of the Adams Family Papers, and publishing The Letters of Benjamin Rush. Princeton University Press is a leader in the field that has embraced the world of digital scholarship while continuing to support book editions.

The award was presented by last year’s winner, Roger Bruns, and accepted on behalf of the Press by Barbara Oberg, General Editor Emerita of The Jefferson Papers. Bruns’ comments follow:

One scholar wrote of the Jefferson edition, “…, the ever-increasing attention over the years to thorough translation of multiple languages and powerful, thoughtfully chosen illustrations make for a stimulating and more comprehensive reading experience. Precision is the hallmark of the Princeton University Press. Quality, durability, and consistency frame the content––matching the degree of adoration that the historical Jefferson himself brought to his books and papers.” The Press has published sixty volumes of the Jefferson Papers in three series and throughout this time its commitment to the best standards has never wavered.

The contributions of Princeton University Press to historical documentary editing go far beyond the Jefferson Papers. The Press published all sixty-nine volumes of The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, edited by Arthur Link. It also published both volumes of the Letters of Benjamin Rush in 1951 and both volumes of the Political Correspondence and Public Papers of Aaron Burr in 1983.

But historical projects are certainly not the only beneficiaries of this commitment to scholarly publishing. Just listen to the some of the multitude of subjects, the unprecedented list of individual whose papers the Press has, with precision and efficiency, published in the last few decades. It has published collected works of Carl Jung, Kierkegaard’s Writings, a critical edition of W. H. Auden, Collected Writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and The Writings of Henry David Thoreau.

It has published the Collected Works of Paul Valery; the Collected Works of Goethe; editions of Erich Neumann and St. John Perse, The Collected Dialogues of Plato, and the Complete Works of Aristotle. I’m surprised that the Press has not published the secret diaries of King Tut.

This record represents a remarkable dedication to a broad and deep presentation of important contributions to literature, classicism, history, poetry, science, and music. When you stop and think about the breadth and amount of scholarship it seems, it is, astonishing.

In addition to this remarkable publishing legacy, the Press also entered into a unique collaboration with Hebrew University of Jerusalem in co-sponsoring a scholarly edition of The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. The project has published fourteen volumes to date, with each volume appearing first with the documents in their original language and then reissued in English translation.

 

Peter Dougherty, the director of Princeton University Press adds, “For my colleagues at PUP and for the editors of our documentary book projects, we are honored to receive the 2017 Lyman H. Butterfield Award and thrilled that our long-time publishing partner and dear friend Barbara Oberg [has accepted] it for us.

The award is timely because it recognizes Peter’s distinguished leadership of the Press for more than a decade. He is stepping down as director later this year.

Women, Interrupted

Tuesday saw an Uber board member wisecracking about women talking too much (he later resigned), while democratic senator Kamala Harris found herself interrupted for the second time that week by her male colleagues. 

Coincidence? Not at all, say the experts. Yesterday the New York Times called out the all too frequent experience of women interrupted by male colleagues, noting that anecdote and academic studies alike confirm that “being interrupted, talked over, shut down or penalized for speaking out is nearly a universal experience for women when they are outnumbered by men.” Cited in the piece is Princeton University Press author Tali Mendelberg, co-author of The Silent Sex: Gender, Deliberations and Institutions which examines what happens when more women join decision-making groups:

[Mendelberg] and Christopher F. Karpowitz, associate professor of political science at Brigham Young University, found that, at school board meetings, men and women did not speak as long until women made up 80 percent of the school board. When men were in the minority, however, they did not speak up less.

During the past week, women from a range of sectors have offered up their own personal experiences and frustrations on social media. According to Deborah Gillis, president and chief executive of Catalyst, which works for women’s advancement in business, the situation is plagued by what is by now a familiar irony. She is quoted in the New York Times piece:

“The fact that women are outnumbered in every room puts them in a position where they’re often coming up against gender-based stereotypes,…Women are too hard, too soft, but never just right. What that means is that women are seen as either competent or liked but not both.”

The Daily Show was quick to make hay about the sheer irony of a sexist remark finding its way to a meeting that was actually aimed at addressing sexism. The clip cites research by Karpowitz and Mendelberg:

 

Frank Lloyd Wright turns 150

Frank Lloyd Wright, the influential American architect, interior designer, thinker, and educator, was born 150 years ago today. A leader of the Prairie School movement, Wright was a prolific practitioner of what he called “organic architecture”, which emphasized creating structures in harmony with humanity and its environment. Fallingwater, completed in 1939 in Pennsylvania and stretching over a thirty-foot waterfall, embodied this philosophy perfectly. Now a National Historic Landmark that has seen more than 4.5 million visitors, the house is only one of the more than 1,000 structures Wright designed across the span of a long career, 532 of which saw completion. His creations can be seen across America, from Wisconsin, to Arizona, to New York City, and his uncompleted designs range from a mile high tower he envisioned for Chicago to an opera house in Baghdad:

Frank Lloyd Wright’s plan for the Baghdad Opera House

The Press has published a number of important and lavishly illustrated books on the visionary architect over the years, including Modern Architecture by Wright himself. Recently, Neil Levine authored a followup study to his first landmark book on Wright. The new volume, The Urbanism of Frank Lloyd Wright, overturns the conventional view of Wright as an architect who deplored the city and whose urban vision was limited to a utopian plan for a network of agrarian communities he called Broadacre City. Rather, Levine reveals Wright’s larger, more varied, interesting, and complex urbanism. Will Wiles of Apollo Magazine hails the new volume enthusiastically: “The Urbanism of Frank Lloyd Wright is a companion to Levine’s landmark study The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, published in 1997, and it is as monumental as might be inferred from the 20-year wait.”

Just out this spring is Wright on Exhibit, by Kathryn Smith, which offers the first history of Frank Lloyd Wright’s exhibitions of his own work—a practice central to his career. Take a peek.

Drawing extensively from his unpublished correspondence, Smith challenges the preconceived notion of Wright as a self-promoter who displayed his work in search of money, clients, and fame. She shows how he was an artist-architect projecting an avant-garde program, an innovator who expanded the palette of installation design as technology evolved, and a social activist driven to revolutionize society through design. Read more in a recent interview with Smith on the PUP blog.

Happy 150th to a visionary whose legacy continues to influence the way we live, build and innovate.