Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Magnolia

Welcome back to the warblers!

Magnolia Warbler, Spring Male, credit Scott Whittle

As the warbler migration season approaches, we’re again highlighting some fun facts about the warblers with our Weekly Warbler feature. Kicking it off today is the Magnolia Warbler.

From page 340-341 in The Warbler Guide:

The Magnolia Warbler has bright yellow underparts and throat. Its tail pattern is unique and diagnostic—it has a black tail with broad white base. It often spreads tail, showing white tail spots very high in tail. The Magnolia Warbler has a black face mask with white eyebrow stripe and white under-eye arc. It is one of the three warblers that have a bright yellow rump (along with Yellow-rumped and Cape May). The Magnolia Warbler has a heavy black necklace that extends down sides. It is moderately active, usually in low to mid-story. During migration it is versatile, foraging in many habitats.

 

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

A new giveaway to get you ready for spring warbler migration

With the spring migration underway, take the opportunity to head to the field and watch these brightly colored neotropical migrants travel back north.

WarblerThe Warbler Guide is an essential resource for any warbler enthusiast, and the most comprehensive and user-friendly source for warbler information that makes warbler identification easier than ever.

Not feeling like carrying a book? PUP also offers many portable options. You can download the Warbler Guide App (now available for both Apple & Android devices) to get all the benefits of the book in the palm of your hand, plus many more app-only features. For example, with the rotatable 3D models that enable you to see a warbler from any angle, you can identify a warbler from the exact position you see it.

You can also download our FREE Quick Finders in pdf or jpg. Offering a quick snapshot of every North American species of warbler for side-by-side comparison, the Quick Finders sort warblers in a variety of ways to suit your needs.

WarblersIt’s also time for a new giveaway! Seven winners will receive a copy of the North American Warblers Fold-out Guide—a handy, pocket-sized foldout reference, with QR codes that take you to a range of common vocalizations for each species. Follow the directions below—the entry period ends April 20!

You can also check out Nicholas Lund’s tips and advices on birdwatching during spring migration, or check BirdCast for realtime bird forecasts that track the waves of migrants.

Armed with the most helpful tools and guides, you just might have your best spring birdwatching season ever!

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Bird Fact Friday – Why do birds sing?

From page 18 of Better Birding:

Songs differ from “calls” in that songs are longer, often more complex vocalizations. In most birds (though not all) songs are given by males, usually on the breeding territory, and serve the dual purpose of attracting females and driving away rival males. In some species both males and females sing. When females sing, it is less often about attracting males (though it probably does help strengthen pair bonds) and usually more about territorial defense against neighboring pairs. Often, the species in which females sing are less migratory or resident, so territories require year-round defense from rivals.

Better BirdingBetter Birding
Tips, Tools, and Concepts for the Field
George L. Armistead & Brian L. Sullivan
Introduction

Better Birding reveals the techniques expert birders use to identify a wide array of bird species in the field—quickly and easily. Featuring hundreds of stunning photos and composite plates throughout, this book simplifies identification by organizing the birds you see into groupings and offering strategies specifically tailored to each group. Skill building focuses not just on traditional elements such as plumage, but also on creating a context around each bird, including habitat, behavior, and taxonomy—parts so integral to every bird’s identity but often glossed over by typical field guides. Critical background information is provided for each group, enabling you to approach bird identification with a wide-angle view, using your eyes, brain, and binoculars more strategically, resulting in a more organized approach to learning birds.

Bird Fact Friday – What’s the best weather for peak hawk flights?

From page 10 in Hawks from Every Angle:

During spring, many peak flights occur ahead of a warm front, as birds heading north use southerly prevailing winds. Most fall flights occur after the passage of a cold front, when northerly winds that assist birds heading south are most prevalent. Geography, however, determines which specific wind directions will lead birds to each site. The most favorable winds for ridge sites are those that strike the ridge at an angle that produces optimal lift. At coastal and shoreline sites, optimal winds are those that “push” birds towards the shorelines. Even during snow squalls or light drizzle, optimal wind conditions can produce significant hawk flights.


hawksHawks from Every Angle
How to Identify Raptors In Flight
Jerry Liguori
Foreword by David A. Sibley

Identifying hawks in flight is a tricky business. Across North America, tens of thousands of people gather every spring and fall at more than one thousand known hawk migration sites—from New Jersey’s Cape May to California’s Golden Gate. Yet, as many discover, a standard field guide, with its emphasis on plumage, is often of little help in identifying those raptors soaring, gliding, or flapping far, far away. Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species at the various angles that they are seen.

Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, Hawks from Every Angle is unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail—the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada. All aspects of raptor identification, including plumage, shape, and flight style traits, are discussed. For all birders who follow hawk migration and have found themselves wondering if the raptor in the sky does in fact match the one in the guide, Hawks from Every Angle—distilling an expert’s years of experience for the first time into a comprehensive array of truly useful photos and other pointers for each species—is quite simply a must.

Bird Fact Friday – The most loquacious geese

From page 235 in Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia:

A snow goose can be very loquacious, even noisy, especially in flight, when taking off or landing. It produces loud, raucous, barking calls gwok or ga-ik, as well as other sounds more like those of grey geese, lower and hoarser: gung, wa-iir or hun-hrr. Large flocks utter these calls continuously and at different pitches, linked to the birds’ size.

Waterfowl of North America, Europe, and Asia
An Identification Guide
Sébastien Reeber

This is the ultimate guide for anyone who wants to identify the ducks, geese, and swans of North America, Europe, and Asia. With 72 stunning color plates (that include more than 920 drawings), over 650 superb photos, and in-depth descriptions, this book brings together the most current information on 84 species of Eurasian and North American waterfowl, and on more than 100 hybrids. The guide delves into taxonomy, identification features, determination of age and sex, geographic variations, measurements, voice, molt, and hybridization. In addition, the status of each species is treated with up-to-date details on distribution, population size, habitats, and life cycle. Color plates and photos are accompanied by informative captions and 85 distribution maps are also provided. Taken together, this is an unrivaled, must-have reference for any birder with an interest in the world’s waterfowl.

When the Women Set Sail

In 1852, after the publication of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Elizabeth Barrett Browning urged her friend, art critic and memoirist Anna Jameson to read the novel, and expressed her indignation when Jameson found the subject of the novel too incendiary for a woman to tackle. Barrett Browning wrote in her letter to Jameson: “[I]s it possible that you think a woman has no business with questions like the question of slavery? Then she had better use a pen no more.” Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s assertion of her obligations as a female writer and poet is just one example of female writers’ active participation in the debates about the crucial concerns of civil society. Instead of concerning themselves solely with their domestic lives, women writers over the centuries have devoted themselves to aspiration, adventure, and public discourse. With stories about traveling, emigration, escape, and exodus, they have confronted ideas such as class formation, slavery, warfare, feminism, globalism, and the clash of cultures.

At Home in the World by Maria DiBattista and Deborah Epstein Nord is a reevaluation of the works of women writers, from canonical figures such as Jane Austen and George Eliot, to contemporary writers like Nadine Gordimer and Anita Desai. The authors argue that a complicated relationship and a recurring dialectic of home and abroad remain central in the literary expression of women’s experiences over two centuries. Searching for a “promised land” or a site of true belonging (the Home with a capital “H”), these women writers find the idea of Home in need of constant rediscovery and reinvention.

And rediscover they do. At the conclusion of Jane Austen’s Persuasion, Anne Elliot takes a brave step to liberation by accepting a future life of possible distress and impending war. Anne ends in a “non-place,” her possible life on a ship will be a life with indefinite location; however, this might offer her a true Home alongside Captain Wentworth, which promises conjugal happiness and a loving companionship. In Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, Lucy Snowe leaves England abruptly and impulsively for the town of Villette, and starts a journey of adventure and dislocation. She increasingly comes to “mark her place”, not as wife or keeper of a household, but as traveler, writer, and teacher. She retreats from bourgeois domesticity and begins to envision a new model of Home: a place that enables a woman to live and thrive alone in the world. Stepping out of the private realm and a conventional home provides a space of possibility—a new incarnation of Home begins to take shape at the moment when the women set sail.

When explaining the title of their book, DiBattista and Nord write: “Our title is meant to conjure the image of those dauntless women writers who ventured across the threshold that leads from home into the public thoroughfares of thought and action where history is made, the world reformed and reimagined. The peripatetics whose work and tradition we chronicle in these pages are determinedly and inventively moving toward a promised land—for so many called it that—where they hope to feel, at last, at home in the great world” (11). However, the discovery of a true Home is always problematic or even impossible, for its discovery or search often takes the form of “creating, writing, recording, and reporting back—activities that never really find a terminus” (248).

Public engagement by women writers is an ongoing process. Through continued dissent and active involvement with the most pressing issues in public life, they continue to forge an artistic path home in the world.

You can read the introduction to At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, From Austen to the Present, by Maria DiBattista and Deborah Epstein Nord here.

Bird Fact Friday – When habitat dictates behavior

From page 15 of Better Birding:

Habitat very often dictates behavior. A Northern Harrier glides and swoops low over fields and marshes, periodically flapping and hovering. It behaves this way because it hunts rodents and this kind of low, cruising flight allows it to more easily detect prey. A Harrier’s long wings allow it to pluck rodents cleanly from grassy cover. Harriers have evolved just so, to nimbly take advantage of these open habitats, including during migration. An appreciation of these qualities allows good birders to recognize a Harrier by its structure or movements from considerable distances. Species evolve to take best advantage of their environment.

Better BirdingBetter Birding
Tips, Tools, and Concepts for the Field
George L. Armistead & Brian L. Sullivan
Introduction

Better Birding reveals the techniques expert birders use to identify a wide array of bird species in the field—quickly and easily. Featuring hundreds of stunning photos and composite plates throughout, this book simplifies identification by organizing the birds you see into groupings and offering strategies specifically tailored to each group. Skill building focuses not just on traditional elements such as plumage, but also on creating a context around each bird, including habitat, behavior, and taxonomy—parts so integral to every bird’s identity but often glossed over by typical field guides. Critical background information is provided for each group, enabling you to approach bird identification with a wide-angle view, using your eyes, brain, and binoculars more strategically, resulting in a more organized approach to learning birds.

Bird Fact Friday – Why do birds molt?

From page 32 in The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds:

Birds essentially do the same things cyclically, and this includes molting. They do this for a number of reasons. It is important that feathers be kept in good condition to keep the bird warm, dry, and mobile. Of course, some like to look good to attract a mate! Having an understanding of molt and how it affects a bird’s appearance is a large help not only in identifying birds but also in ageing and sexing them.

The Crossley ID Guide
Eastern Birds
Richard Crossley
Introduction

Crossley ID GuideThis stunningly illustrated book from acclaimed birder and photographer Richard Crossley revolutionizes field guide design by providing the first real-life approach to identification. Whether you are a beginner, expert, or anywhere in between, The Crossley ID Guide will vastly improve your ability to identify birds.

This is the first book to feature large, lifelike scenes for each species. These scenes—640 in all—are composed from more than 10,000 of the author’s images showing birds in a wide range of views—near and far, from different angles, in various plumages and behaviors, including flight, and in the habitat in which they live. These beautiful compositions show how a bird’s appearance changes with distance, and give equal emphasis to characteristics experts use to identify birds: size, structure and shape, behavior, probability, and color. Each scene provides a wealth of detailed visual information that invites and rewards careful study, but the most important identification features can be grasped instantly by anyone.

Bird Fact Friday – How to identify birds in various light conditions

From page 5 in Hawks from Every Angle:

Understanding how various light conditions can affect the appearance of raptors is important in identification. Lightly colored birds can lack contrast and appear uniformly dark in poor light, such as when backlit or against a cloudy sky, whereas true dark morph birds show a contrast underneath between the body and flight feathers. By contrast, birds can look paler than usual when illuminated by highly reflective ground cover such as snow, sand, and pale grasses. Several conditions affect the way a bird’s size and shape are perceived. Against a bright blue sky, birds often appear smaller than usual; however, birds may appear larger than usual when observed against cloud cover.

hawksHawks from Every Angle
How to Identify Raptors In Flight
Jerry Liguori
Foreword by David A. Sibley

Identifying hawks in flight is a tricky business. Across North America, tens of thousands of people gather every spring and fall at more than one thousand known hawk migration sites—from New Jersey’s Cape May to California’s Golden Gate. Yet, as many discover, a standard field guide, with its emphasis on plumage, is often of little help in identifying those raptors soaring, gliding, or flapping far, far away. Hawks from Every Angle takes hawk identification to new heights. It offers a fresh approach that literally looks at the birds from every angle, compares and contrasts deceptively similar species, and provides the pictures (and words) needed for identification in the field. Jerry Liguori pinpoints innovative, field-tested identification traits for each species at the various angles that they are seen.

Featuring 339 striking color photos on 68 color plates and 32 black & white photos, Hawks from Every Angle is unique in presenting a host of meticulously crafted pictures for each of the 19 species it covers in detail—the species most common to migration sites throughout the United States and Canada. All aspects of raptor identification, including plumage, shape, and flight style traits, are discussed. For all birders who follow hawk migration and have found themselves wondering if the raptor in the sky does in fact match the one in the guide, Hawks from Every Angle—distilling an expert’s years of experience for the first time into a comprehensive array of truly useful photos and other pointers for each species—is quite simply a must.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Yellow warbler

Good news for all the birders out there! We are hosting a Warbler Guide App giveaway today on Instagram (princetonupress). Follow us and like our post to enter, and we will be randomly selecting a winner among the participants on Monday, Feb 6.

From page 466-467 in The Warbler Guide:

The yellow warbler has a plain face with round, black eyes. Its stout black bill stands out against its yellow face. There is yellow edging on its wing feathers. Some of the yellow warblers show red streaking in breast; however, the amount of red beast streaking is variable, usually dull or lacking in females. The yellow warbler is a very widespread species: it can be found in low trees and woodland edges, and often in willows or wet areas.

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

More than superstition: Happy Groundhog Day!

The groundhog may have no talent for predicting the arrival of spring, but it surely can enlighten us on animals’ reactions to changing weather patterns. According to biologist Daniel T. Blumstein, celebrating Groundhog Day is about more than a superstition. In the Washington Post, he notes, “Understanding how individual groundhogs respond to environmental change is essential if we want to predict how animals will react to global warming and other human-driven habitat shifts.”

And no worries if Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow on Groundhog Day, after all, if winter comes, can spring be far behind?

To know more about this mysterious mammal, check out Roland W. Kays and Don E. Wilson’s book Mammals of North America, an indispensable guide for amateur naturalists and professional zoologists alike.


Mammals of North America
Second Edition
Roland W. Kays & Don E. Wilson
Introduction
Mammals of North America APP

Covering 20 species recognized since 2002 and including 13 new color plates, this fully revised edition of Mammals of North America illustrates all 462 known mammal species in the United States and Canada—each in beautiful color and accurate detail. With a more up-to-date species list than any other guide, improved facing-page descriptions, easier-to-read distribution maps, updated common and scientific names, and track and scat illustrations, this slim, light, and easy-to-use volume is the must-have source for identifying North American mammals.

 

 

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warber: Northern parula

Welcome back to the warblers!

From page 366-367 in The Warbler Guide:

The northern parula is very small and active. It has bright yellow throat and breast, and green back patch surrounded by blue. It has broken eye-arcs, which look prominent on its plain bluish face, black lores, and white wing bars. The northern parula is an acrobatic feeder, often hanging upside down. Its bill is brightly bicolored, unlike most other warblers. It is featured on the book cover of The Warbler Guide!

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.