Bird Fact Friday – Harris’s Hawks hunt cooperatively

Credit William S. Clark

From page 190-191 in Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

The Harris’s Hawk preys mainly on mammals, especially rabbits, and birds, but also lizards and insects. They hunt on the wing and from perches. Cooperative hunting occurs more often in winter. Unlike many buteos, they don’t hover. They perch more horizontally than other raptors and are often seen in groups of up to a dozen individuals, especially in winter. They breed cooperatively, often with polygamy and nest helpers. A large stick nest is built in small to large trees and sometimes on power poles and cell towers.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff
Introduction | Sample Plate

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Tuesday’s Trot – Belgian

From page 166 in Horses of the World:

5 things you should know about the Belgian draft horse, the most powerful of all draft horses:

1. The Belgian draft horse is tall, very massive, and very muscular. It can easily surpass a ton in weight.

2. The Belgian draft horse is a very ancient breed, and it is the descendant of strong medieval chargers that carried armored knights, notably the horses of Flanders: Ardennais, Brabançon, and Flemish.

3. In the past the breed contributed to the creation or the improvement of other draft horses, such as the Suffolk Punch and Clydesdale. Its power made it the preferred farm horse before the appearance of tractors. By refusing to cross their breed the Belgians succeeded in preserving its specific qualities.

4. It is probably the most powerful of all draft horses. But it is a docile horse, calm and very cooperative.

5. In Belgium it is considered a national treasure, and its breeding is supported by the state.

Horses of the World
Élise Rousseau
Illustrated by Yann Le Bris
Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
Sample Entry

Horses of the World is a comprehensive, large-format overview of 570 breeds of domestic and extant wild horses, including hybrids between the two and between domestic breeds and other equids, such as zebras. This beautifully illustrated and detailed guide covers the origins of modern horses, anatomy and physiology, variation in breeds, and modern equestrian practices. The treatment of breeds is organized by country within broader geographical regions—from Eurasia through Australasia and to the Americas. Each account provides measurements (weight and height), distribution, origins and history, character and attributes, uses, and current status. Every breed is accompanied by superb color drawings—600 in total—and color photographs can be found throughout the book.

Describing and depicting every horse breed in existence, Horses of the World will be treasured by all who are interested in these gorgeous animals.

Bird Fact Friday – Which vulture’s head color varies with mood?

Lesser Yellow-headed
Vulture. Adult. Credit William S. Clark

From page 95 in Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vultures forage for carrion by gliding low over wet open areas and are able to locate carrion by smell as well as by sight. They also spend lots of time perched on the ground or on a low fence post. Active flight is with slow, deep, deliberate wing beats on flexible wings. They soar and glide with wings in a strong dihedral, often rocking or teetering from side to side, rarely soaring high. Adults’ head color varies with mood; the head is redder when the vulture is excited. Cathartid vultures often bow their wings downward in a flex until the tips almost meet.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff
Introduction | Sample Plate

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Tuesday’s Trot – Akhal-Teke

From page 302 in Horses of the World:

5 things you should know about the Akhal-Teke, a national emblem of Turkmenistan:

1. The Akhal-Teke is known for its characteristic and particularly striking golden or silver metallic shimmer, a quality rare among other horses.

2. Extremely elegant and sleek, the Akhal-Teke can be recognized at first sight. Its skin is extremely fine. In its country it is often protected by thick blankets which contribute to keeping its hair very short.

3. This breed, among the most ancient, a descendant of the ancient Turkoman horses, was once a fearsome war horse admired for its speed and endurance. The breed has influenced many saddle breeds, notably the Thoroughbred.

4. This exceptional horse probably has the best endurance of any breed in the world. Its uncommon resilience enables it to tolerate the most diverse climates, from extreme heat to extreme cold. This resilience and hardiness, to which is added great longevity, are rare in such a sport and competitive breed.

5. Its nature is delicate and sensitive, and it is best for experienced riders. It is said that it is a one-rider horse.

Horses of the World
Élise Rousseau
Illustrated by Yann Le Bris
Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
Sample Entry

Horses of the World is a comprehensive, large-format overview of 570 breeds of domestic and extant wild horses, including hybrids between the two and between domestic breeds and other equids, such as zebras. This beautifully illustrated and detailed guide covers the origins of modern horses, anatomy and physiology, variation in breeds, and modern equestrian practices. The treatment of breeds is organized by country within broader geographical regions—from Eurasia through Australasia and to the Americas. Each account provides measurements (weight and height), distribution, origins and history, character and attributes, uses, and current status. Every breed is accompanied by superb color drawings—600 in total—and color photographs can be found throughout the book.

Describing and depicting every horse breed in existence, Horses of the World will be treasured by all who are interested in these gorgeous animals.

Bird Fact Friday – How do long-winged harriers hunt prey?

From page 145 in Raptors of Mexico and Central America:

The Long-winged Harriers are typical harriers that hunt in low, slow flight just above the ground, pouncing on prey with a quick agile strike. They eat small mammals, small birds, frogs, lizards, and bird’s eggs. Some prey is located by hearing, enhanced by their owl-like facial disk. The Long-winged Harrier’s scientific name is Circus buffoniCircus is from the Greek kirkos, “circle,” from its habit of flying in circles. The species name,  buffoni, is for French naturalist George Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America
William S. Clark & N. John Schmitt
With a foreword by Lloyd Kiff
Introduction | Sample Plate

Raptors are among the most challenging birds to identify in the field due to their bewildering variability of plumage, flight silhouettes, and behavior. Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the first illustrated guide to the region’s 69 species of raptors, including vagrants. It features 32 stunning color plates and 213 color photos, and a distribution map for each regularly occurring species. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, age-related plumages, status and distribution, subspecies, molt, habitats, behaviors, potential confusion species, and more.

Raptors of Mexico and Central America is the essential field guide to this difficult bird group and the ideal travel companion for anyone visiting this region of the world.

Tuesday’s Trot – Thoroughbred

From page 48 in Horses of the World:

The favored discipline of the Thoroughbred is the flat race (gallop).

5 facts you should know about the famous Thoroughbred, a breed unequaled for speed racing:

1. This breed has been selected for its speed. Since its creation, it has not undergone any crossing and is bred with pure blood.

2. Among the modern breeds, the Thoroughbred has had the greatest impact. Its creation was a turning point in global equestrian history. The breed has been used to improve a great number of other breeds.5 facts you should know about the famous Thoroughbred, a breed unequaled for speed racing

3. Horse racing has also definitively changed, as no horse is as fast as a Thoroughbred in speed races.

4. This is a delicate, nervous, spirited, sometimes unstable horse because it is bred for its athletic performance and not its character. It is energetic, athletic, brave, and very fast. It is a horse that demands time and very attentive care.

5. The breed is one of the most widespread in the world, with millions of horses and more than 118,000 births every year.

Horses of the World
Élise Rousseau
Illustrated by Yann Le Bris
Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
Sample Entry

Horses of the World is a comprehensive, large-format overview of 570 breeds of domestic and extant wild horses, including hybrids between the two and between domestic breeds and other equids, such as zebras. This beautifully illustrated and detailed guide covers the origins of modern horses, anatomy and physiology, variation in breeds, and modern equestrian practices. The treatment of breeds is organized by country within broader geographical regions—from Eurasia through Australasia and to the Americas. Each account provides measurements (weight and height), distribution, origins and history, character and attributes, uses, and current status. Every breed is accompanied by superb color drawings—600 in total—and color photographs can be found throughout the book.

Describing and depicting every horse breed in existence, Horses of the World will be treasured by all who are interested in these gorgeous animals.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Black-throated Blue

From page 192-193 in The Warbler Guide:

Black-throated Blue Warbler, Fall Female, credit Scott Whittle

The female Black-throated Blue Warbler’s blue-green back and buffy undersides create a relatively low-contrast appearance. Its darker cheek creates a faint mask. Though from some angle, the mask can be very prominent. A small white “handkerchief” mark is created by white coloration at the base of the outer primaries. The Black-throated Blue Warbler is an active, understory forager, often seen near eye level. It frequently makes a loud, dry, “kissy” chip call while foraging in the fall. The Black-throated Blue Warbler is a good example of sexual dimorphism: the male and female are very different in color, although their body structure is the same.

 

 

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Tuesday’s Trot – Przewalski’s Horse

From page 27 in Horses of the World:

A herd drinking at a water hole and rolling in the mud. Foals are slightly lighter.

5 things you should know about Przewalski’s Horse—the only surviving species of wild horse:

1. Przewalski’s Horse is an entirely wild species discovered in 1879 by a Russian, Colonel Przewalski. It has never been domesticated.

2. It has 66 chromosomes, whereas the domestic horse has only 64—which does not prevent them from being crossed and having fertile off spring.

3. It became extinct in the wild in 1969, but its presence in many zoos has enabled it to be put into programs of conservation and reintroduction.

4. This wild horse is fast, very resilient, and able to endure very extreme climate conditions. Like the zebra, it cannot be trained.

5. Free-range herds exist in Mongolia and in China. Programs of reintroduction and herds in semi-freedom exist in France, Spain, Belgium, and China.

Horses of the World
Élise Rousseau
Illustrated by Yann Le Bris
Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
Sample Entry

Horses of the World is a comprehensive, large-format overview of 570 breeds of domestic and extant wild horses, including hybrids between the two and between domestic breeds and other equids, such as zebras. This beautifully illustrated and detailed guide covers the origins of modern horses, anatomy and physiology, variation in breeds, and modern equestrian practices. The treatment of breeds is organized by country within broader geographical regions—from Eurasia through Australasia and to the Americas. Each account provides measurements (weight and height), distribution, origins and history, character and attributes, uses, and current status. Every breed is accompanied by superb color drawings—600 in total—and color photographs can be found throughout the book.

Describing and depicting every horse breed in existence, Horses of the World will be treasured by all who are interested in these gorgeous animals.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Blackpoll

From page 182-183 in The Warbler Guide:

The Blackpoll Warblers (fall birds) have yellowish throat and breast in contrast with the white lower belly. They have bold white wing bars, and distinct eyeline with broken eyering. The Blackpoll Warblers have contrasting tertial edging, and flight feathers white-edged on tips. Their streaking in sides and back is always present even when faint. Their long wings indicate a long-distance migrant: up to 7,000 miles each way—more than any other warbler.

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Tuesday’s Trot – Quarter Horse

From page 432 in Horses of the World:

A great equestrian nation, the United States has a large number of breeds, among the most famous and admired. It also has the greatest number of horses of any country in the world; in 2011 around 10,150,000 horses were counted (with Texas in the lead, followed by California, Florida, and Oklahoma). The United States has favored the breeding of horses with excellent character, with a great diversity of coat colors, and with supplemental gaits that are encouraged or developed in many breeds.

Due to their incredibly fast starts and bursts of speed, Quarter Horses are also used in racing, often practiced today on straight, 300-meter courses.

Today, we’re bringing you 5 fun facts about America’s most popular horse—the Quarter Horse:

1. The Quarter Horse is an incredible sprinter and is the fastest in the world over quarter-mile courses, 440 yards (around 402 m), from which it derives its name (it was first called the Quarter Running Horse).

The head is characteristic: rather small, with a wide forehead; large, wide-spaced eyes; narrow muzzle; and large nostrils.

2. The Quarter Horse, one of the oldest of American breeds, descends from Iberian and Eastern horses, crossed with the ancestors of English Thoroughbreds.

3. The Quarter Horse has a particularly docile nature, is cooperative, adaptable, calm, and reliable following many years of selection for good character.

4. The Quarter Horse excels in Western riding (reining, trail, cutting, and others), its specialty, but it also makes a good carriage horse and is used for trekking, racing, polo, and so forth. Its excellent, reassuring character makes it good for beginning riders.

5. The breed is the most popular in the world, and it is very widespread with around 5 million horses registered with the American Quarter Horse Association.

Horses of the World
Élise Rousseau
Illustrated by Yann Le Bris
Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
Sample Entry

Horses of the World is a comprehensive, large-format overview of 570 breeds of domestic and extant wild horses, including hybrids between the two and between domestic breeds and other equids, such as zebras. This beautifully illustrated and detailed guide covers the origins of modern horses, anatomy and physiology, variation in breeds, and modern equestrian practices. The treatment of breeds is organized by country within broader geographical regions—from Eurasia through Australasia and to the Americas. Each account provides measurements (weight and height), distribution, origins and history, character and attributes, uses, and current status. Every breed is accompanied by superb color drawings—600 in total—and color photographs can be found throughout the book.

Describing and depicting every horse breed in existence, Horses of the World will be treasured by all who are interested in these gorgeous animals.

Bird Fact Friday – Weekly Warbler: Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat, Spring Male, credit Scott Whittle

From page 254-255 in The Warbler Guide:

The Common Yellowthroat is one of our most widespread warblers. It is wren-like, and often skulks in marsh or low brush near water. It hops when on the ground, and it is frequently seen at or below eye level. The Common Yellowthroat has a small bill, a short neck and overall a plump appearance. It has short, rounded wings and a cocked tail in flight, and it is generally a weak flier. The adult male has a broad black mask across forehead and face, with paler border above, which is unique among warblers. When disturbed, it often pops up quickly, and then dives back down into cover. The Common Yellowthroats are the only U.S. and Canada warblers to nest in open marshes.

The Warbler Guide
Tom Stephenson & Scott Whittle
Drawings by Catherine Hamilton
Warbler Guide App
Species Account Example: American Redstart Male

Warblers are amwarblerong the most challenging birds to identify. They exhibit an array of seasonal plumages and have distinctive yet oft-confused calls and songs. The Warbler Guide enables you to quickly identify any of the 56 species of warblers in the United States and Canada. This groundbreaking guide features more than 1,000 stunning color photos, extensive species accounts with multiple viewing angles, and an entirely new system of vocalization analysis that helps you distinguish songs and calls.

The Warbler Guide revolutionizes birdwatching, making warbler identification easier than ever before. For more information, please see the author videos on the Princeton University Press website.

Tuesday’s Trot – Icelandic Horse

Good news for all the horse lovers out there! Starting this week in our new “Tuesday’s Trot” feature, we’re highlighting some fun facts about various horses from Horses of the World. Kicking it off today is the Icelandic Horse.

From page 32 in Horses of the World:

Iceland has only one breed of horse, but what a breed it is! The Icelandic is one of the most amazing horses in the world, with its incredible variety of colors and its five gaits. Iceland has developed its own equestrian culture, and a specific saddle for it. The horse plays a major role in Icelandic mythology and its great sagas. Some Europeans use the term “pony” to describe this small horse, but the term “pony” isn’t used in Iceland, just as it isn’t in many countries of the world.

Icelandic equitation is based on the breed’s specific gaits (here, the tölt).

 

Icelandic Saddle

5 things you should know about the Icelandic Horse:

1. The Icelandic is particularly ancient and pure due to the ban, since 982, on importing new horses into Iceland. The horses that leave Iceland don’t return. The Icelandic has thus not undergone any crossing.

2. Adapted to an extreme climate, the Icelandic is very resilient and very hardy. Many horses spend the harsh winter outdoors. It is an easy keeper.

3. The Icelandic is a very intelligent horse; it is calm and friendly, but independent and energetic.

4. One of the unique characteristics of the Icelandic is its additional gaits, the tölt and the flying amble. It is one of the only gaited horses native to Europe, as European breeders have eliminated this characteristic in many breeds.

5. A horse with a strong identity, the Icelandic has been introduced successfully into many countries beginning in the twentieth century. There are currently more than 180,000 Icelandics throughout the world.

 

Horses of the World
Élise Rousseau
Illustrated by Yann Le Bris
Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan
Sample Entry

Horses of the World is a comprehensive, large-format overview of 570 breeds of domestic and extant wild horses, including hybrids between the two and between domestic breeds and other equids, such as zebras. This beautifully illustrated and detailed guide covers the origins of modern horses, anatomy and physiology, variation in breeds, and modern equestrian practices. The treatment of breeds is organized by country within broader geographical regions—from Eurasia through Australasia and to the Americas. Each account provides measurements (weight and height), distribution, origins and history, character and attributes, uses, and current status. Every breed is accompanied by superb color drawings—600 in total—and color photographs can be found throughout the book.

Describing and depicting every horse breed in existence, Horses of the World will be treasured by all who are interested in these gorgeous animals.