Untranslatable Tuesdays – Kitsch

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To mark the publication of Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon, we are delighted to share a series of playful graphics by our design team which illustrate some of the most interesting terms from the Dictionary. This second week in the “Untranslatable Tuesdays” series we present Kitsch (German):

ENGLISH      junk art, garish art, kitsch

The word Kitsch is German in origin and had previously been translated into French as art de pacotille (junk art) or art tape-á-l’oeil (garish art), but the original term has now become firmly established in all European languages. Used as an adjective, kitsch or kitschy qualifies cultural products intended for the masses and appreciated by them….As a kind of debased popularization, it offers a decadent model that is all the more alluring for being so easily accessible. This is, at least, what its detractors say.

Bob Geddes to Give Talk, Tour, and Book Signing at the Institute for Advanced Study

Calling all Princeton-area architecture fans: Bob Geddes will be giving a lecture, tour, and book signing of Fit: An Architect’s Manifesto, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, on Saturday, April 5th, from 10:00 AM to 1:30 PM (EDT), sponsored by DOCOMOMO Philadelphia and DOCOMOMO NY/Tri-State.

Tickets and full event details are available via Eventbrite ($20 for DOCOMOMO members / $25 for non-members / FREE for IAS faculty, scholars, and staff).

Photo: Amy Ramsey, Courtesy of Institute for Advanced StudyMake it New, Make it Fit

The architecture of Geddes, Brecher, Qualls, and Cunningham (GBQC) has been largely overlooked in recent years—despite a remarkable and influential body of work beginning with their runner-up submission for the Sydney Opera House (1956). As significant contributors (along with Louis Kahn) to the “Philadelphia School,” GBQC’s efforts challenged modernist conceptions of space, functional relationships, technology, and—with an urbanist’s eye—the reality of change over time.

To explore the thinking behind the work, founding partner Robert Geddes, FAIA, will speak about his recent publication, Fit: An Architect’s Manifesto. In addition, Geddes will guide a tour through the venue for his talk, the Institute of Advanced Study’s Simmons Hall—a GBQC masterwork of 1971. Geddes will also participate in an informal discussion with participants during lunch at the IAS Cafeteria.

Schedule
10:00-10:30am      Dilworth Room. Event check in. Coffee served.
10:30-11:15am        Make it New, Make it Fit Lecture by Bob Geddes
11:15-11:50am        Building Tour
11:50-12:10pm       Lunch at cafeteria where discussion continues
12:10-1:00pm         Lunch and discussion
1:00-1:30pm           Wrap up and book signing.

Parking
LOT ‘B’ enter through West Building. When you arrive at the site, please bring a copy of your tickets, either printed or displayed on your mobile phone.

About the speaker
Robert Geddes is dean emeritus of the Princeton School of Architecture and founding partner of GBQC—recipient of the AIA’s Firm of the Year Award in 1979. Educated under Walter Gropius at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, Geddes returned to his native Philadelphia in 1950 where he began his work as an educator at the University of Pennsylvania.

Mirror, Mirror Book Giveaway!

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We are doing a book giveaway to celebrate the upcoming book birthday of Simon Blackburn’s Mirror, Mirror: The Uses and Abuses of Self-Love on March 26th .

Three lucky readers will each win one cloth copy of Mirror, Mirror.

How to enter? There are numerous ways to enter, including liking the Princeton University Press Facebook page, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, tweeting about the giveaway or following at @PrincetonUPress, or pinning the author’s book selfie (above) on Pinterest. Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winners will be selected on Friday, March 21st.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra, and Michael Wood discuss the Dictionary of Untranslatables [VIDEO]

Earlier this week, close to one hundred humanities lovers gathered for a discussion around the Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon with editors Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra, and Michael Wood, due out this month from Princeton University Press.

Please enjoy this video of the entire event, the first in this season’s Great New Books in the Humanities series co-sponsored by the Humanities Initiative and by the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University:

 

Edmund Fawcett discusses Liberalism: The Life of an Idea [VIDEO]

Love it or hate it, liberalism is here to stay–and it has a long and fascinating history. Edmund Fawcett explains more about his forthcoming book Liberalism: The Life of an Idea in this wonderful video interview with Natalia Nash. How do we define liberalism? Edmund Fawcett explores the underlying ideas that guide the liberal story here:

Learn more about Edmund Fawcett and Liberalism at the Princeton University Press site.

Save the Date: Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics event 2/4

Calling all poetry and reference fans in the tri-state area! Full announcement via Public Books and the Heyman Center:

Poetry Reading and Talk: Reference Works

February 4, 2014 — 6:15 p.m.
The Schapiro Center, Davis Auditorium
Columbia University
New York, New York

Reference Poetry Event at Columbia
Poets talk about the scholarly resources that inspire them, including poetry anthologies, rhyming dictionaries, standard dictionaries, handbooks of poetic forms, and other resources, such as the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (the latest edition of which was published in 2013).

 

Participants include:

• Nada Gordon, Instructor of English at Pratt Institute

Dorothea Lasky, Assistant Professor in the School of the Arts at Columbia University

Tan Lin, Associate Professor of Creative Writing at New Jersey City University

Bob Perelman, Professor of English at University of Pennsylvania;

Rowan Ricardo Phillips, Associate Professor of English at State University of New York Stony Brook.

Co-sponsored by the Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Columbia University Department of English and Comparative Literature, and The Koch-Dupee Poetry of the American Avant-Garde Reading Series

Poet, Critic Susan Stewart to Lead Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets

Stewart_Love Lessons_AUphotoPrinceton University Press is pleased to announce that the poet and MacArthur Fellow Susan Stewart will be the new editor for its Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets. She succeeds Paul Muldoon, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and New Yorker poetry editor.

Stewart, who also has had a distinguished career as a critic and translator, is currently the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities: Professor of English at Princeton University where she teaches aesthetics, poetics, and the history of poetry and directs the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts. Stewart is a past chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the recipient of an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

On her appointment, Susan Stewart said: “At this moment, when American poets have taken so many new directions in their individual poems and the shapes of their books of poems, I look forward to considering a wide range of submissions, from new and established poets alike. The series will, I hope, feature volumes notable for their originality and considered sense of form.”

Princeton Humanities Publisher Rob Tempio said: “Everyone at Princeton University Press is thrilled and honored that Susan has agreed to succeed Paul Muldoon as editor of the Contemporary Poets series. She is a brilliant poet, scholar and critic who is perfectly poised to identify and foster compelling and original voices from all areas of contemporary poetry.”

Stewart will serve for a three year term. Submissions of complete manuscripts for the series may be sent to the Press between the dates of May 1st and May 31st each year and Stewart will announce selections each September.

Princeton University Press published Stewart’s first book of poems Yellow Stars and Ice as part of the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets in 1981 and also published her translation Love Lessons: Selected Poems of Alda Merini in 2009. Her volumes of poetry include The Hive, The Forest, Red Rover, and Columbarium, which won the 2003 National Book Critics Circle Award.

Through the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets, the Princeton University Press is dedicated to publishing the best work of today’s emerging and established poets. Starting in 1975 with the publication of Sadness and Happiness: Poems by Robert Pinsky, the series quickly distinguished itself as one of the most important publishing projects of its kind, winning praise from critics and poets alike. Other publications in the series include landmark collections such as Before Recollection (1987) by Ann Lauterbach, Hybrids of Plants and of Ghosts (1980) and Erosion (1983) by Jorie Graham, The Eternal City: Poems (2010) by Kathleen Graber, and Almanac: Poems (2013) by Austin Smith.

Media Inquiries:
Casey LaVela
casey_lavela@press.princeton.edu
609.258.9491

Stuart Mitchner on Princeton University Press: “The University Publisher”

Stuart Mitchner has a very nice piece on Princeton University Press in the most recent issue of Princeton Magazine, which includes mention of several recent books and authors. To give you a feel, here is the introductory paragraph:

Princeton University Press celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2005 with the publication of A Century in Books, which showcased 100 volumes that “best typify what has been most lasting, most defining, and most distinctive about our publishing,” according to the introduction by outgoing director Walter Lippincott, who was succeeded in March of that year by the current director Peter J. Dougherty. The co- chair of the search committee at the time was University Provost Christopher Eisgruber, the University’s newly installed twentieth president and the subject of this issue’s cover story. What the provost said about the new director eight years ago could be said by the president today, that he’s looking forward to working with Dougherty “to sustain the healthy relationship between the Press and the University.”

To illustrate the depth of the rest of Mitchner’s piece, here is a slideshow of the important books featured in the article:

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To read Mitchner’s full article in Princeton Magazine, click here.

A very Kafkaesque 130th birthday anniversary!

In case you haven’t looked at today’s Google Doodle yet, July 3rd marks the 130th birthday anniversary of novelist Franz Kafka. Kafka is the subject of a major three-part biography by Reiner Stach and translated by Shelley Frisch, the first two of which are just out this month from our fair Press (KAFKA: The Years of Insight and KAFKA: The Decisive Years, for those not already in the know).

In the commercial publishing world,  Peter Mendelsund came up with some stellar cover overhauls for many of Kafka’s works for Schocken Books, a division of Random House, including “The Trial,” “Amerika,” and “The Castle.” Here’s a fun birthday video they released for the anniversary, as part of what graphic artist Neil Gower aptly calls the “Tour de Franz“:

The birthday coverage has also been picked up by Michael Cavna of Washington Post‘s Comic Riffs blog, Mashable, PC Magazine, the Guardian, and the Toronto Star, among others. Over at the Christian Science Monitor, Katherine Jacobsen identifies a great quote from British poet W. H. Auden on the brilliant German-language writer:

Kafka is important because his predicament is the predicament of modern man.

We couldn’t have put it better ourselves, so in that spirit, happy birthday, Dr. Kafka!

Happy Father’s Day from #OddCouples

Father’s Day is upon us once more, which can mean only one thing: new eCards, this time for whoever you call “dad,” “old man,” “papa,” “pop,” “pa,” or even your favorite father-figure or head of household. We take our inspiration yet again from Daphne Fairbairn’s wonderful book Odd Couples: Extraordinary Differences between the Sexes in the Animal Kingdom, which recently published on May 15th.

So go ahead and blog about, Tweet out, post to Facebook, and otherwise share these! Enjoy!

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Mulgan at the RSA: “I was struck that our debate had lost the capacity to ask how capitalism might evolve into something different”

In case you missed it, Geoff Mulgan, author of the recently published The Locust and the Bee, gave a truly excellent talk at the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufacturers and Commerce (RSA) back in March and it has just been made available online!

You can also listen to a podcast of the full event including audience Q&A here.

Happy Mother’s Day from #OddCouples

This Mother’s Day, we’re offering up some cheeky eCards for you to share with the special women in your life—all inspired by Daphne Fairbairn’s fascinating book Odd Couples: Extraordinary Differences between the Sexes in the Animal Kingdom, which publishes on May 15th. Trust us, human beings (yes, this includes Mom and Dad) won’t seem so strange once you’ve read about these other species!

Feel free to blog about, Tweet out, post to Facebook, and otherwise share these! Enjoy!

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