Weekly Wanderlust: Cruises

Cruises are the perfect getaway, combining the allure of the vast open sea with a boat full of activities and nightlife, while offering the unique opportunity to experience the ocean in a way that would never be possible from the shore. Before your ocean adventure, check out some of the sea life you could encounter!

Howell Jacket Two-thirds of our planet lies out of sight of land, just offshore beyond the horizon. What wildlife might you see out there? This handy guide, designed for quick use on day trips off the East Coast, helps you put a name to what you find, from whales and dolphins to shearwaters, turtles, and even flying fish. Carefully crafted color plates show species as they typically appear at sea, and expert text highlights identification features. Essential for anyone heading out on a whale-watching or birding trip, this guidebook provides a handy gateway to the wonders of the ocean.
Howell jacket If your ocean adventure takes you off the west coast, this Offshore Sea Life ID Guide, designed for quick use on day trips off the West Coast, helps you identify whales and dolphins, albatrosses, turtles, and even flyingfish. Carefully crafted color plates show species as they typically appear at sea, and expert text highlights identification features. This user-friendly field guide is essential for anyone going out on a whale-watching or birding trip, and provides a handy gateway to the wonders of the ocean.
Howell jacket If you travel the open ocean anywhere in the tropics, you are very likely to see flyingfish. These beautifully colored “ocean butterflies” shoot out of the water and sail on majestic, winglike pectoral fins to escape from predators such as dolphins, swordfish, and tuna. Some can travel for more than six hundred feet per flight. The ideal gift for fish lovers, seasoned travelers, and armchair naturalists alike, The Amazing World of Flyingfish provides a rare and incomparable look at these spectacular marine creatures.
Ebert Jacket This is the first field guide to identify, illustrate, and describe the world’s 501 shark species. Its compact format makes it handy for many situations, including recognizing living species, fishery catches, or parts sold at markets. The book also contains useful sections on identifying shark teeth and the shark fins most commonly encountered in the fin trade. A Pocket Guide to Sharks of the World is an essential resource for fisheries management, international trade regulation, and shark conservation.
Palumbi Jacket The ocean teems with life that thrives under difficult situations in unusual environments. The Extreme Life of the Sea takes readers to the absolute limits of the ocean world—the fastest and deepest, the hottest and oldest creatures of the oceans. It dives into the icy Arctic and boiling hydrothermal vents—and exposes the eternal darkness of the deepest undersea trenches—to show how marine life thrives against the odds.

Weekly Wanderlust: Yellowstone

Yellowstone is the world’s first national park, and home to some of the oldest and most awe inspiring sites in the United States. Commonly known for tourist attractions such as the geyser Old Faithful, Yellowstone is a complex geothermal area containing half the world’s natural geysers. It is also a highly valued protected ecosystem, home to some of the most amazing wildlife, from grizzly bears and wolves, to herds of bison and elk. The human story of Yellowstone spans more than 11,000 years, making the area an important archaeological site as well.

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon of Yellowstone

Grand Prismatic Spring

Grand Prismatic Spring

Excelsior geyser

Excelsior geyser

 

Whether you plan to camp, hike, fly-fish, or immerse yourself in the region’s history, you may want to check out Justin Farrell’s new book, The Battle for Yellowstone for some background on the park’s moral, cultural, and spiritual roots.

Farrell jacketYellowstone is globally recognized as the crown jewel of modern environmental preservation. But the park and its surrounding regions have recently become a lightning rod for environmental conflict, plagued by intense and intractable political struggles among the federal government, National Park Service, environmentalists, industry, local residents, and elected officials. The Battle for Yellowstone asks why it is that, with the flood of expert scientific, economic, and legal efforts to resolve disagreements over Yellowstone, there is no improvement?

Justin Farrell argues that the battle for Yellowstone has deep moral, cultural, and spiritual roots that until now have been obscured by the supposedly rational and technical nature of the conflict. Tracing the moral causes and consequences of large-scale social change in the American West, he describes how a “new-west” social order has emerged that has devalued traditional American beliefs about manifest destiny and rugged individualism.

Justin Farrell is assistant professor of sociology in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. You can read a Q&A with him here.

Photos of Yellowstone courtesy of Claudia Classon

Weekly Wanderlust: The Caribbean

Southeast of the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean (taken from Caribs, an ethnic group native to the Lesser Antilles and parts of South America at the time of the Spanish conquest) is home to over 700 islands and reefs. With its warm water, proximity to ports, and easy accessibility from the mainland US, the islands have long been a popular vacation destination. Whether you enjoy swimming with the dolphins in the islands of Aruba or taking advantage of the Bahamas’ extensive nightlife scene, the Caribbean offers enough variety in activities, climate, and geography for everyone. Make sure to make time during your trip for plenty of snorkeling with the migratory schools of fish, and exploring the wildlife that can only be found in these islands. If you’re lucky, you’ll even catching a glimpse of some of the unusual animals inhabiting the area.

Caribbean Image

Perhaps these books will help you familiarize yourself with the Caribbean’s natural offerings.

Raffaele Jacket Wildlife of the Caribbean is the first comprehensive illustrated guide to the natural world of the Caribbean islands. It contains 600 vivid color images featuring 451 species of plants, birds, mammals, fish, seashells, and much more. While the guide primarily looks at the most conspicuous and widespread species among the islands, it also includes rarely seen creatures—such as the Rhinoceros Iguana and Cuban Solenodon—giving readers a special sense of the region’s diverse wildlife.
Kohn Jacket Conus is the largest genus of animals in the sea, occurring throughout the world’s tropical and subtropical oceans and contributing significantly to marine biodiversity. The shells of these marine mollusks are prized for their amazing variety and extraordinary beauty.  This beautifully illustrated book identifies 53 valid species of the southeastern United States and the Caribbean, a region that supports a diverse but taxonomically challenging group of Conus.
Lieske Jacket Expanded and updated to include an additional 44 species, Coral Reef Fishes is a handy guide to those fishes that are likely to be observed by anybody visiting or diving on the coral reefs of the Caribbean, the Indian Ocean, and the Pacific to a depth of sixty meters. Accessible to amateur marine life enthusiasts, this book is the first comprehensive guide of its kind. It enables the reader to quickly identify 2,118 species of fish and includes over 2,500 color illustrations depicting the major forms of each species–male, female, immature, or geographical varieties.

Princeton University Press gears up for MathFest 2015!

MathFest is an annual event held to celebrate mathematics with the Mathematical Association of America. This year, it will be held from August 5-8 in Washington, D.C.  Keep an eye out for all of the exciting things happening at the Princeton University Press Booth at this year’s MathFest, including book raffles, author readings, and more!

Below is a list of what you can look forward to at MathFest from our authors!

Thursday, August 6th

10:30AM – 11:30AM: Author Colin Adams gives a dramatic reading from Zombies and Calculus

2:00PM – 3:00PM: Author Tim Chartier demonstrates one of the popular hands-on approaches to math that he outlines in his book Math Bytes: the Candy pi-calculator

3:00PM – 4:00PM: Single Digits author Marc Chamberland shows videos from his popular YouTube channel Tipping Point Math

4:00PM – 5:00PM: Arthur Benjamin, author of The Fascinating World of Graph Theory, gives an author meet and greet, along with book plate signing

 Friday, August 7th

11:00AM – 12:00PM: Jim Henle, author of The Proof and the Pudding: What Mathematicians, Cooks, and You Have in Common, presents a personalized puzzle printing

1:00PM – 2:00PM: Frank Farris, author of Creating Symmetry, hosts a symmetry patterned scarf giveaway

Daniel A. Bell sheds light on Meritocracy and Democracy in “The China Model”

As the country gears up for a presidential election, government and structure are in the spotlight, with many wondering where our government fits in and how it stacks up in comparison to others. Daniel A. Bell dismisses the simplistic notion of ‘good’ democracies and ‘bad’ authoritarian regimes, focusing on the ideals and reality of a unique system that falls into neither category: political meritocracy in China. His new book, The China Model: Political Meritocracy and the Limits of Democracy sheds light on a political system that he says could prove to be the most important political development of the twenty-first century.  Clive Crook wrote in Bloomberg View, “Open-minded readers will find it equips them with a more intelligent understanding of Chinese politics and, no less valuable, forces them to examine their devotion to democracy.”

Watch the video below to see Daniel A. Bell discuss different models of government and more at the ideacity Conference.

To preview The China Model, read the introduction here. Learn more about Daniel A. Bell, here.

#NewBooks from Princeton University Press

Books released spanning the weeks of June 29th and July 6th, 2015.

Included in the new releases is Christine Hayes’ What’s Divine about Divine Law? Early Perspectives, a book that untangles the classical and biblical roots of the Western idea of divine law and shows how early adherents to biblical tradition—Hellenistic Jewish writers such as Philo, the community at Qumran, Paul, and the talmudic rabbis—struggled to make sense of this conflicting legacy.

Learn more about all of our releases over the past two weeks by clicking on the images below.

New in Hardcover

Hayes jacket

New in Paperback

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#WinnerWednesday: Congratulations to Our Authors!

Congratulations to our authors who have received prestigious honors over the past week!

Winner of the 2015 Hagley Prize in Business History, Hagley Museum and Library and Business History Conference

  • Walter A. Friedman – Fortune Tellers: The Story of America’s First Economic Forecasters

“The Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference jointly offer an annual prize for the best book in business history, broadly defined. The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives. It is particularly interested in innovative studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline.”

Find more information about the Hagley Prize here.

Winner of the 2015 Stuart L. Bernath Book Prize, Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations

  • Adam Ewing – The Age of Garvey: How a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black Politics

“The purpose of the award is to recognize and encourage distinguished research and writing by scholars of American foreign relations. The prize of $2,500 is awarded annually to an author for his or her first book on any aspect of the history of American foreign relations.”

Find more information about the Stuart L. Bernath Prize here.

Happy Independence Day!

The Fourth of July is a day of barbecues and bonding with the family… and American History books! If you find yourself needing a history fix after the fireworks, explore some of our best, including, America in Our Time: From World War II to Nixon — What Happened and WhyOverreach: Leadership in the Obama PresidencyThe Concise Princeton Encyclopedia of American Political History, Governing America: The Revival of Political History, and Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right.

 

America Jacket Overreach Jacket
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Check out even more American History titles here.

Author Phillip Hoffman offers an In-Depth Look At “Why Did Europe Conquer The World?”

Between 1492 and 1914, Europeans conquered 84 percent of the globe. But why did Europe rise to the top, when for centuries the Chinese, Japanese, Ottomans, and South Asians were far more advanced? Why didn’t these powers establish global dominance? In Why Did Europe Conquer the World?, distinguished economic historian Philip Hoffman demonstrates that conventional explanations—such as geography, epidemic disease, and the Industrial Revolution—fail to provide answers. Arguing instead for the pivotal role of economic and political history, Hoffman shows that if variables had been at all different, Europe would not have achieved critical military innovations, and another power could have become master of the world.

Check out this video in which Hoffman sheds light on the two millennia of economic, political, and historical changes that set European states on a distinctive path of development and military rivalry.

 

Princeton University Press Books Dominate on Popular Reading Lists!

If you’re looking for the perfect book to compliment your vacation or leisure time, here are some standouts to check out.

Roy Christopher‘s Summer Reading List featured four Princeton University Press books including: Michael Nelson‘s Reinventing Discovery, Lisa McGirr‘s Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right, Jürgen Osterhammel‘s The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century, and Steven F. Railsback and Volker Grimm‘s Agent-Based and Individual-Based Modeling: A Practical Introduction.

Nielson jacket McGirr Jacket
 Osterhammel Jacket  Grimm Jacket

Check out Roy Christopher’s entire Summer Reading List 2015 here.

Award-winning journalist Frann Briggs also released a list, The Best of Spring Reading 2015 Part 1, featuring Princeton University Press publication Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work by Edwidge Danticat.

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Explore the list in its entirety here.

 

 

Q&A with Olivier Zunz, Author of Philanthropy in America: A History

Zunz JacketOlivier Zunz is the Commonwealth Professor of History at the University of Virginia and the author of Philanthropy in America: A History, which was recently updated and re-released to include a new preface written by Zunz.

Recently, he answered some questions for HistPhil, a new philanthropy blog, on what philanthropy really means, what made him decide to write Philanthropy in America, and more.

One of the greatest challenges in writing an overview of the history of American philanthropy would seem to be defining the term itself. How did you think about what philanthropy means, and what you would include and exclude, in your survey? How do you think these decisions shaped your work? And how do you think they might shape the field of the history of philanthropy more generally?

OZ: I did not want to start with very strict definitions of what is philanthropy exactly because I was very aware that the word is used in many different contexts. I am a student of Tocqueville and having thought about the many different ways that he uses the word ‘equality’ and the many different ways he uses the word ‘liberty’ I felt that, very early on, what was most important for me was to capture a process of giving in American history rather than something we could clearly define as ‘philanthropy.’ I am in general agreement with the traditional distinction people have made between philanthropy and charity, with charity being more often used for various forms of almsgiving and temporary help and philanthropy more often used, at least in American history, for long-term goals, searching for root causes. This definition makes sense and to the extent that I respected one [definition], I respected that one. But I was more conscious of the magnitude of giving in the American economy and then of the need to think of philanthropy as a part of the capitalist economy, of giving as being a major component of what we call the nonprofit sector—of giving in a particular economic context. And I also wanted to think of giving as a politically involved proposition, if not explicitly at least implicitly. It was important to me to try to describe an ongoing process of giving that had political and economic consequences rather than to start with a narrow definition and say this is what we’re studying. I took the less obvious path to clarity, but eventually I thought that it would yield a greater understanding of the process.

Check out the rest of Olivier Zunz‘s interview, here.

Preview Philanthropy in America: A History, here.

#WinnerWednesdays: Congratulations to our authors!

Congratulations to our authors who have received honors over the past week!

Co-Winner of the 2015 Ralph Gomory Prize, Business History Conference

  • Emily Erikson – Between Monopoly and Free Trade: The English East India Company, 1600–1757

“This prize, made possible by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, recognizes historical work on the effects of business enterprises on the economic conditions of the countries in which they operate. A prize of $5,000 is awarded annually for a book published in the two years prior to the year of the award.”

For more information about this prize, click here.

Jeremiah P. Ostriker is a Co-Winner of the 2015 Gruber Cosmology Prize for Theoretical and Experimental Explorations of the Universe (with John Carlstrom and Lyman Page), The Gruber Foundation.

“The Cosmology Prize honors a leading cosmologist, astronomer, astrophysicist or scientific philosopher for theoretical, analytical, conceptual or observational discoveries leading to fundamental advances in our understanding of the universe.”