Archives for January 2015

Donald E. Canfield and Gillen D’Arcy Wood to be honored at annual conference of the American Meteorological Society

On January 7th and 8th in Phoenix, Arizona, authors Donald E. Canfield and Gillen D’Arcy were recognized by the Atmospheric Science Librarians International (ASLI) for their books Oxygen: A Four Billion Year History and Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World, respectively.

Canfield’s account of the history and importance of oxygen won him the 2014 ASLI Choice Award and will be recognized as “a well-documented, accessible, and interesting history of this vital substance.” Wood received an honorable mention for this year’s Choice Award in History. Tambora, will be acknowledged as “a book that makes this extreme event newly accessible through connecting literature, social history, and science.” More general information on the awards can be found, here.

Congratulations to Donald E. Canfield and Gillen D’Arcy Wood!

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Oxygen:
A Four Billion Year History
Donald E. Canfield

 

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Tambora:
The Eruption That Changed the World
Gillen D’Arcy Wood

10 facts about bees from The Bee by Noah Wilson-Rich

Everyone is familiar with bees, but few are aware of their significance in our survival. The roles of bees in the ecosystem include pollinating more than 130 fruit, vegetable, and seed crops. They also are critical to the reproduction and diversity of flowers.

The Bee

10 Bee Facts:

1. Only female bees sting, and many solitary bees can’t sting.

2. A bee’s sting (or stinger) is a modified egg-laying organ.

3. A bee has five eyes: two are complex eyes that see movement well, while the other three detect light intensity.

4. Bees can see ultraviolet light, but they cannot see the red end of the spectrum, so they perceive the world as more blue and purple than we do.

5. Drones do not have a father, but they do have a grandfather.

6. Bees are herbivores, and their diet comes entirely from flowers—carbohydrates from nectar and protein from pollen.

7. Honey bees are not native to the Americas, and bumble bees are not native to Australia.

8. A queen bee has exactly the same genes as a worker: she develops into a queen simply because she is fed extra rations of royal jelly when she is a larva.

9. The honey bee genome has been sequenced; it is about one-tenth the size of the human one.

10. Bees pollinate over 130 fruit and vegetable crops, and produce many other things that benefit humans—honey, wax, resins, propolis, royal jelly, and even venom.

The Bee

For more information on bees, the human-bee relationship, and beekeeping read The Bee by Noah Wilson-Rich.


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The Bee:
A Natural History

Noah Wilson-Rich

With contributions from Kelly Allin, Norman Carreck & Andrea Quigley

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973 by Mark Greif
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Locus of Authority: The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education by William G. Bowen & Eugene M. Tobin
Mastering ’Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke
Irrational Exuberance: Revised and Expanded Third edition by Robert J. Shiller
On Bullshit by Harry Frankfurt
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird
Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul’s School by Shamus Rahman Khan

“A Brief History” of Stephen Hawking’s work

As we near February, and Oscars month (our calendars are marked for Feb. 22!), PUP takes a look at The Theory of Everything. The best-picture nominee, which stars Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones, depicts the love story and life story of Stephen Hawking and Jane Wilde. The beginning of the film is set in Cambridge, where Hawking is a brilliant graduate student. For movie-goers looking for a deeper look at Hawking’s scholarly work, PUP brings you a “Brief History” of books by Stephen Hawking.

Liam Daniel / Focus Features Eddie Redmayne stars as Stephen Hawking in THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING.

Liam Daniel / Focus Features
Eddie Redmayne stars as Stephen Hawking in THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING.

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A Brief History of Time

“A landmark volume in science writing by one of the great minds of our time, Stephen Hawking’s book explores such profound questions as: How did the universe begin—and what made its start possible? Does time always flow forward? Is the universe unending—or are there boundaries? Are there other dimensions in space? What will happen when it all ends?

Told in language we all can understand, A Brief History of Time plunges into the exotic realms of black holes and quarks, of antimatter and “arrows of time,” of the big bang and a bigger God—where the possibilities are wondrous and unexpected. With exciting images and profound imagination, Stephen Hawking brings us closer to the ultimate secrets at the very heart of creation.”

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On the Shoulders of Giants

“In On the Shoulders of Giants, Stephen Hawking brings together the greatest works by Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton and Einstein, showing how their pioneering discoveries changed the way we see the world.

From Copernicus’ revolutionary claim that the earth orbits the sun and Kepler’s development of the laws of planetary motion to Einstein’s interweaving of time and space, each scientist built on the theories of their predecessors to answer the questions that had long mystified humanity.

Hawking also provides fascinating glimpses into their lives and times – Galileo’s trial in the Papal inquisition, Newton’s bitter feuds with rivals and Einstein absent-mindedly jotting notes that would lead to his Theory of Relativity while pushing his baby son’s pram. Depicting the great challenges these men faced and the lasting contributions they made, Hawking explains how their works transformed the course of science – and gave us a better understanding of the universe and our place in it.”

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The Nature of Space and Time

Princeton University Press

By Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose

“Einstein said that the most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible. But was he right? Can the quantum theory of fields and Einstein’s general theory of relativity, the two most accurate and successful theories in all of physics, be united in a single quantum theory of gravity? Can quantum and cosmos ever be combined? On this issue, two of the world’s most famous physicists–Stephen Hawking (A Brief History of Time) and Roger Penrose (The Emperor’s New Mind and Shadows of the Mind)–disagree. Here they explain their positions in a work based on six lectures with a final debate, all originally presented at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge.

How could quantum gravity, a theory that could explain the earlier moments of the big bang and the physics of the enigmatic objects known as black holes, be constructed? Why does our patch of the universe look just as Einstein predicted, with no hint of quantum effects in sight? What strange quantum processes can cause black holes to evaporate, and what happens to all the information that they swallow? Why does time go forward, not backward? In this book, the two opponents touch on all these questions.”

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The Universe in a Nutshell

“In this new book Hawking takes us to the cutting edge of theoretical physics, where truth is often stranger than fiction, to explain in laymen’s terms the principles that control our universe.

Like many in the community of theoretical physicists, Professor Hawking is seeking to uncover the grail of science — the elusive Theory of Everything that lies at the heart of the cosmos. In his accessible and often playful style, he guides us on his search to uncover the secrets of the universe — from supergravity to supersymmetry, from quantum theory to M-theory, from holography to duality.

He takes us to the wild frontiers of science, where superstring theory and p-branes may hold the final clue to the puzzle. And he lets us behind the scenes of one of his most exciting intellectual adventures as he seeks ‘to combine Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity and Richard Feynman’s idea of multiple histories into one complete unified theory that will describe everything that happens in the universe.'”

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The Grand Design

“When and how did the universe begin? Why are we here? What is the nature of reality? Is the apparent ‘grand design’ of our universe evidence for a benevolent creator who set things in motion? Or does science offer another explanation? In The Grand Design, the most recent scientific thinking about the mysteries of the universe is presented in language marked by both brilliance and simplicity.

The Grand Design explains the latest thoughts about model-dependent realism (the idea that there is no one version of reality), and about the multiverse concept of reality in which there are many universes. There are new ideas about the top-down theory of cosmology (the idea that there is no one history of the universe, but that every possible history exists). It concludes with a riveting assessment of m-theory, and discusses whether it is the unified theory Einstein spent a lifetime searching for.”

See more books by Stephen Hawking here. Which of these have you read, and which are on your “to-read” list?

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the last week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
Irrational Exuberance: Revised and Expanded Third edition by Robert J. Shiller
Mastering ’Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke
On Bullshit by Harry Frankfurt
How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method by G. Polya
Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul’s School by Shamus Rahman Khan
The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973 by Mark Greif

Frank Wilczek to edit The Princeton Companion to Physics

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Source: MIT Department of Physics, http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/wilczek_frank.html

Princeton University Press is honored and excited to announce that Frank Wilczek (Herman Feshbach Professor of Physics at MIT) will be Volume Editor of the forthcoming Princeton Companion to Physics. Wilczek is co-recipient (with David Gross and H. David Politzer) of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of asymptotic freedom. He is also the author of Longing For the Harmonies (Norton, 1987; New York Times Notable Book of the Year) and The Lightness of Being (Basic Books, 2010).

Following on the models of The Princeton Companion to Mathematics (Timothy Gowers, Ed.) and The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics (forthcoming, Nicholas Higham, Ed.), this single-volume, carefully curated collection of well-written essays will present the big and essential themes of research in the various areas comprising the physical sciences.

Ingrid Gnerlich, Science Group Publisher and the commissioning editor of the work, comments: “A unique feature of this type of Companion volume is the very special intellectual vision of the Volume Editor, in terms of how the scope, philosophy, and level of the content are articulated and executed. We feel that Prof. Wilczek will offer this project a rare depth and breadth of insight and perspective, combined with a sensitivity for graceful and accessible language, which will make this book a ‘must have’ for a wide readership of physics students, professional physicists and other scientists, and even an array of sophisticated general readers. We anticipate this book to be an example of the very best type of Princeton publication— a superb volume that guides, inspires, and enlightens.”

The anticipated publication date for The Princeton Companion to Physics is 2018.

 

A few words on the “Bullshit Centenary”

k7929[1]We are all familiar with Princeton University Press’s famous publication On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt, winner of the 2005 Bestseller Award in Philosophy. Well, the history of the word “bullshit” goes far back in time, but perhaps not as far as one might think…

One hundred years ago a young immigrant poet submitted his poem “The Triumph of Bullshit” for publication in a London avant‑garde magazine. The editor’s letter explaining his rejection of the work makes clear he decided to “stick to my naif determination to have no ‘Words ending in -Uck, -Unt and –Ugger’.” Probably the word “bullshit” was imported from the poet’s native US; but so far no one has found “bullshit” in print as a single word before 1915.

Source: The Guardian, “TS Eliot: the poet who conquered the world, 50 years on,” http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jan/10/from-tom-to-ts-eliot-world-poet

How do we reconcile this young subversive poet with the “po-faced ‘Pope of Russell Square’ (as the older Eliot came to be nicknamed)” who is widely respected as one of the finest poet of the 20th century? What else do we owe to TS Eliot? Read more here: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jan/10/from-tom-to-ts-eliot-world-poet

Drumroll, please…. Introducing Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for 2014

With 2014 in the history books and the media already predicting which books will be big in 2015, we are happy to look back at our best-selling titles for the year. It is a list noticeable for diversity of subject (fairy tales, math, ancient history, and birds all make an appearance) and for what it says about the longevity of some of our older titles, (say hello to stalwart books like On Bullshit, The I Ching, and The Box). We hope you find something wonderful to read on this list and if you’ve already read any of these books, let us know in the comments section below.

The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm edited by Jack Zipes
Alan Turing: The Enigma, The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges
1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
On Bullshit by Harry Frankfurt
The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle
The I Ching or Book of Changes edited by Hellmut Wilhelm
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup by Noam Wasserman
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird
Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit by Charles W. Calomiris & Stephen H. Haber
The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City by William B. Helmreich
Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide by Paul H. Williams, Robbin W. Thorp, Leif L. Richardson & Sheila R. Colla
The Calculus Lifesaver: All the Tools You Need to Excel at Calculus by Adrian Banner
Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck
The Soul of the World Roger Scruton
The Age of the Vikings Anders Winroth
Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion by Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke

Rare Birds of North America by Steve N. G. Howell, Ian Lewington & Will Russell

Books in literature in 2015

Be among the first to browse and download our new literature catalog!

Of particular interest is The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: The Complete First Edition. When Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published their Children’s and Household Tales in 1812, followed by a second volume in 1815, they had no idea that such stories as “Rapunzel,” “Hansel and Gretel,” and “Cinderella” would become the most celebrated in the world. Yet few people today are familiar with the majority of tales from the two early volumes, since in the next four decades the Grimms would publish six other editions, each extensively revised in content and style. For the very first time, The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm makes available in English all 156 stories from the 1812 and 1815 editions. These narrative gems, newly translated and brought together in one beautiful book, are accompanied by sumptuous new illustrations from award-winning artist Andrea Dezsö.

More of our leading titles in literature can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the Modern Language Association annual convention in Vancouver, BC January 8th–11th, come visit us at booth 217. See you there!

Mathematics publishing in 2015

Be among the first to browse and download our new mathematics catalog!

Of particular interest is Alan Turing: The Enigma: The Book That Inspired the Film The Imitation Game by Andrew Hodges. It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades–all before his suicide at age forty-one. This acclaimed biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing’s royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life.

The inspiration for a major motion picture starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

More of our leading titles in mathematics can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the annual Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Antonio, TX January 10th–13th, come visit us at booth 501.

Please join us for the following book signings on Monday, January 12th:

11:00–12:00:
Tim Chartier
Math Bytes: Google Bombs, Chocolate-Covered Pi, and Other Cool Bits in Computing

12:00–12:45
Victor Katz
Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century

1:30–2:30
Colin Adams
Zombies and Calculus

2:30–3:30
Edward Burger and Mike Starbird
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking

3:30–4:30
Arthur Benjamin, Gary Chartrand, and Ping Zhang
The Fascinating World of Graph Theory

4:40–5:30
Mircea Pitici
The Best Writing on Mathematics, 2014

See you in San Antonio!

The latest in classics and ancient history

Be among the first to browse and download our new ancient world catalog!

Of particular interest is Adrienne Mayor’s The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World. Mayor tells how amazing new archaeological discoveries of battle-scarred female skeletons buried with their weapons prove that women warriors were not merely figments of the Greek imagination. Combining classical myth and art, nomad traditions, and scientific archaeology, she reveals intimate, surprising details and original insights about the lives and legends of the women known as Amazons. Provocatively arguing that a timeless search for a balance between the sexes explains the allure of the Amazons, Mayor reminds us that there were as many Amazon love stories as there were war stories.

Also be sure to note 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

More of our leading ancient world titles can be found in the catalog. You may also sign up with ease to be notified of forthcoming titles at http://press.princeton.edu/subscribe/. (Your e-mail address will remain confidential!)

If you’re heading to the annual Archaeological Institute of America and the Society for Classical Studies meeting in New Orleans January 8th–11th, come visit us at booth 406. We’ll be holding a raffle for a signed copy of 1177 B.C. See you there!

Don’t forget to enter The Warbler Guide sweepstakes!

[Update — all winners have been notified as of January 15, 2015. Thank you for entering our giveaway!]

Don’t let post-Holiday doldrums, back-to-work blahs, and wintery weather get you down. Look forward to spring, warblers, and birdwatching by entering The Warbler Guide Sweepstakes.

Our prize package includes a download of The Warbler Guide App, a copy of The Warbler Guide, a pair of Zeiss TERRA ED binoculars, and the audio companion for The Warbler Guide. The total value of this prize is $400.00.

How to win? There are numerous ways to win, including visiting The Warbler Guide’s Facebook page, emailing us at blog@press.princeton.edu, following @PrincetonNature. or @TheWarblerGuide on Twitter. Just follow the steps in the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected on January 9, 2015.

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