Archives for April 2014

Presenting the Fall 2014 Catalog

F14-catalog-coverWe are delighted to announce the fall 2014 Princeton University Press catalog.

Leading off the fall list is Story/Time: The Life of an Idea, by the celebrated dancer and choreographer Bill T. Jones. Accompanying it are exciting offerings from a range of disciplines including classics, Adrienne Mayor’s The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World; cognitive science, Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek’s Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?; European history, Anders Winroth’s The Age of the Vikings; literature, Paula Rabinowitz’s American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street; and other compelling titles from a broad array of fields.

Enjoy!

Peter J. Dougherty
Director

To view the catalog as a PDF, please click here.

 

Untranslatable Tuesdays – Gender

Cassin gender image

To mark the publication of Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon, we are delighted to share a series of playful graphics by our design team which illustrate some of the most interesting terms from the Dictionary. For week five in the “Untranslatable Tuesdays” series we present Gender:

FRENCH différence des sexes, identité sexuelle, genre

GERMAN Geschlecht

ITALIAN genere

SPANISH género

Quick Questions for Eric Cline, author of 1177 B.C.

Eric Cline at Megiddo high resEric H. Cline is Professor of Classics and Anthropology, Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and Director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at The George Washington University, in Washington DC. An active field archaeologist, he has excavated and surveyed in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Cyprus, Greece, Crete, and the United States for 29 seasons since 1980. He is currently Co-Director of two excavations in Israel: Megiddo (biblical Armageddon) and Tel Kabri. Dr. Cline has published fifteen books including The Battles of Armageddon: Megiddo and the Jezreel Valley from the Bronze Age to the Nuclear Age; Jerusalem Besieged: From Ancient Canaan to Modern Israel; From Eden to Exile: Unraveling Mysteries of the Bible; Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction and The Trojan War: A Very Short Introduction.

His most recent book, 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed, has topped the Amazon.com best-seller list for Kindle, Audio, and Print Archaeology books for several weeks. Writing for The New Yorker, Adam Gopnik described 1177 B.C. as “new and exciting….adding an archaic flavor to the current stew of apprehension and awe about where the world is going, and what we might find when it gets there.”

Now, on to the questions!

What inspired you to get into your field?

My mother gave me a book when I was seven years old. It was called The Walls of Windy Troy and was a biography of Heinrich Schlieman. After reading it, I announced that I was going to become an archaeologist. When I graduated from college with a degree in Classical Archaeology, my mother gave me the same book again…

What would you have been if not an archaeologist?

Unemployed.

What is the biggest misunderstanding people have about what archaeologists do?

They think that I look for dinosaurs.


Civilizations have survived droughts, famines, earthquakes, invaders; but they only had to handle those disasters one at a time.


What was the best piece of advice you ever received?

Do what you love and love what you do.

Why did you write 1177 BC?

I wanted to write about WHAT collapsed as well as explore how and why it collapsed…

What was the most interesting thing you learned from writing this book?

There were numerous interesting things that I learned from writing the book. Among these I would highlight the fact that the Sea Peoples seem to have been given a raw deal in previous scholarly literature and have been used as convenient scapegoats, blamed for ending the Late Bronze Age. In fact, they were just one of the numerous factors that contributed to the demise of multiple civilizations at that time and may have been as much victims as oppressors.  Also, I was intrigued to see that there were so many factors, or stressors/drivers, that contributed to the collapse; I had initially thought that I’d be able to explain away and dismiss one or two, but all of them make some sort of sense. On the other hand, when one thinks about it, that in itself makes sense — civilizations have survived droughts; they have survived famines; they have survived earthquakes; they have survived invaders; but in almost every case, they only had to handle those disasters one at a time. So, when there are multiple disasters all at once, that’s when civilizations might not be able to outlast and survive them. And that seems to have been the case at the end of the Late Bronze Age.


I knew that the book’s theme of Collapse would resonate with many in today’s world, but I wasn’t quite prepared for its timeliness.


What do you think is the book’s most important contribution?

I think that the book’s most important contribution is going to depend upon the individual reader, for it will be different for each one.  Some readers, like Adam Gopnik in the New Yorker, appreciate learning the history and stories of the 300 years during which the various Late Bronze Age civilizations were flourishing…and realizing the parallels to today’s globalized world. Others are more interested in the fact that the Collapse occurred and see parallels to today’s world. Perhaps most surprising to me is the extent to which some readers have latched on to the fact that there was climate change back then, even in the days before the burning of fossil fuels and emissions from cars, etc, etc, and are now applying it to their own arguments, for instance in the NY Post and the National Review Online. Also, I knew that the book’s theme of Collapse would resonate with many in today’s world, but I wasn’t quite prepared for its timeliness, with “disaster” and “collapse” scenarios for our own civilization seeming to appear on a weekly basis at the moment!

What is your next project?

Continue to dig at Megiddo and Kabri during the summers. Writing a book about Megiddo – an archaeological history of Armageddon

 


Eric is the author of:

bookjacket 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed
Eric H. Cline
Hardcover | $29.95 / £19.95 | ISBN: 9780691140896
264 pp. | 6 x 9 | 10 halftones. 2 maps.
eBook | ISBN: 9781400849987
Also available as an audiobook
Reviews
Table of Contents
Free Excerpt, read the Prologue[PDF]

Flight of the Bumble Bee[s of North America]

k10219More than ever before, there is widespread interest in studying bumble bees and the critical role they play in our ecosystems.

To learn more about bumble bees–how to find them, how to identify them, how to help with bumble bee conservation efforts–please check out “Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide” by Paul H. Williams, Robbin W. Thorp, Leif L. Richardson & Sheila R. Colla: http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10219.html

Video credits:

Photos courtesy of authors
Leif L. Richardson
Sheila R. Colla
Paul H. Williams

Music is “Flight of the Bumble Bee”
Composition: Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Performer: US Army Band
http://commons.wikimedia.org [PD-US] [PD-OLD]

PUP News of the World, April 25, 2014

NewsOfTheWorld_Banner

Each week we post a round-up of some of our most exciting national and international PUP book coverage. Reviews, interviews, events, articles–this is the spot for coverage of all things “PUP books” that took place in the last week. Enjoy!


k10195Can you fathom a natural disaster that caused years of disastrous climate change after its occurrence? The year following Mount Tambora’s 1815 eruption became known as the “Year without a Summer,” when weather anomalies in Europe and New England ruined crops, displaced millions, and spawned chaos and disease. In the book Tambora, for the first time, Gillen D’Arcy Wood traces Tambora’s full global and historical reach: how the volcano’s three-year climate change regime initiated the first worldwide cholera pandemic, expanded opium markets in China, set the stage for Ireland’s Great Famine, and plunged the United States into its first economic depression. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein’s monster, inspired by Tambora’s terrifying storms, embodied the fears and misery of global humanity during this transformative period, the most recent sustained climate crisis the world has faced.

Bringing the history of this planetary emergency grippingly to life, Tambora sheds light on the fragile interdependence of climate and human societies, and the threat a new era of extreme global weather poses to us all.

Tambora was recently named one of Publishers Weekly’s “PW Picks: Books of the Week, April 21, 2014.”  Check out the list here and start reading the Introduction to Tambora here!


k10192Looking for a book about the difficult role our government plays in society?  Check out Why Government Fails So Often: And How It Can Do Better by Peter H. Schuck.  From healthcare to workplace conduct, the federal government is taking on ever more responsibility for managing our lives. At the same time, Americans have never been more disaffected with Washington, seeing it as an intrusive, incompetent, wasteful giant. The most alarming consequence of ineffective policies, in addition to unrealized social goals, is the growing threat to the government’s democratic legitimacy. Understanding why government fails so often–and how it might become more effective–is an urgent responsibility of citizenship. In this book, lawyer and political scientist Peter Schuck provides a wide range of examples and an enormous body of evidence to explain why so many domestic policies go awry–and how to right the foundering ship of state.

An urgent call for reform, Why Government Fails So Often is essential reading for anyone curious about why government is in such disrepute and how it can do better.

Author Peter H. Schuck recently wrote op-ed pieces for the Los Angeles Times and for Slate, in which he elaborates on campaign donation restraint issues and historical government programs that have been extremely effective.  And if you’re interested in beginning Why Government Fails So Often, you can start reading Chapter 1 here.


k10055Why do democracies keep lurching from success to failure? The current financial crisis is just the latest example of how things continue to go wrong, just when it looked like they were going right. In this wide-ranging, original, and compelling book, David Runciman tells the story of modern democracy through the history of moments of crisis, from the First World War to the economic crash of 2008.

The Confidence Trap by David Runciman shows that democracies are good at recovering from emergencies but bad at avoiding them. The lesson democracies tend to learn from their mistakes is that they can survive them–and that no crisis is as bad as it seems. Breeding complacency rather than wisdom, crises lead to the dangerous belief that democracies can muddle through anything–a confidence trap that may lead to a crisis that is just too big to escape, if it hasn’t already. The most serious challenges confronting democracy today are debt, the war on terror, the rise of China, and climate change. If democracy is to survive them, it must figure out a way to break the confidence trap.

The Times Literary Supplement recently reviewed The Confidence Trap which can be found here.

“Runciman’s book abounds with fresh insights, arresting paradoxes, and new ways of posing old problems. It is part intellectual history, an absorbing study of the modern debate on democracy through the contrasting perspectives of key public intellectuals, such as Walter Lippmann, George F. Kennan, Francis Fukuyama and Friedrich Hayek, and part analysis of the problem of political leadership in democracies, explored through the decisions taken by leaders, particularly US presidents, and the constraints under which they operate.”- The Times Literary Supplement

Does the Confidence Trap sound appealing? Start reading the Introduction here.


We are all familiar with the flood of year end lists ranking top books, innovators, movies, and so on. But seeing as we a few months out from that January rush, it seems like a great time for a mid-year round up list. On April 23, 2014, Prospect Magazine posted a ranking of the world’s leading thinkers of 2014, according to its readers.  Although the entire list contains 50 top thinkers, a few of our authors were highlighted amongst the top ten.

Coming in at number one on this list is Amartya Sen, author of An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions. Sen is praised for his economic prowess and incredible achievements, including a 1998 Nobel Prize and over 100 honorary degrees. He is also currently a professor at Harvard University.

At number two, we have Raghuram Rajan who is currently the Governor of the Reserve Bank of India.  He is known for successfully predicting the 2008 financial crisis and has also authored Fault Lines: How Hidden Fractures Still Threaten the World Economy.

And at number six on the list, we have Kaushik Basu, the Senior Vice President and Chief Economist at the World Bank.  Basu has authored many books, his most significant being Beyond the Invisible Hand: Groundwork for a New Economics in which he promotes the consideration of culture and custom in the practice of economics.

With a list full of scholars and world changers, check out Prospect Magazine’s “World Thinkers 2014” list here.Capture

Save the Date — David Reimer, “Count Like an Egyptian” at the Princeton Public Library on May 29

052914Reimer

Join the fun on May 29 at 7:00 PM as the Princeton Public Library and Princeton University Press welcome David Reimer, professor of mathematics and statistics at The College of New Jersey, for an exploration of the world of ancient Egyptian math and the lessons it holds for mathematicians of all levels today.

Prof. Reimer will present a fun introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. Learn how to solve math problems with ancient Egyptian methods of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and discover key differences between Egyptian math and modern day calculations (for example, in spite of their rather robust and effective mathematics, Egyptians did not possess the concept of fractions).

Following the lecture, Prof. Reimer will sign copies of his new book, Count Like an Egyptian. Copies of will be available for purchase at the lecture or you can pick up a copy ahead of time at Labyrinth Books.

Looking forward to spring warblers? Join The Warbler Guide at these events in Philadelphia

We’re looking forward to spring with three fantastic warbler events this weekend at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle, co-authors of The Warbler Guide, will be on-hand to give workshops on warbler ID and guide a few walks.

Capture

 

Click here to download a PDF flyer for these events.

The Conflict to Come [Video]

This video was recorded at the How the Light Gets In Festival. Panelists Stephen D. King, Rana Mitter, Joseph Nye discuss the future of conflict with moderator Isabel Hilton.

From the How the Light Gets In Festival web site:

The great 20th-century conflicts were between western powers, and now we see wars between West and East or the West and Islam. But is the future of conflict radically different? Will the great battle of the 21st century be between China and India, with the West watching from the sidelines?

For more of Joseph Nye’s thoughts on leadership, both in times of conflict and otherwise, please check out his book Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era.

Princeton University Press’s best-selling books for the past week

These are the best-selling books for the past week.

 

1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline
Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit by Charles W. Calomiris & Stephen H. Haber
The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel
The Soul of the World by Roger Scruton
The Warbler Guide by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle
Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson
GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
Delphi: A History of the Center of the Ancient World by Michael Scott

Enlightening Symbols: A Short History of Mathematical Notation and Its Hidden Powers
by Joseph Mazur
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

Economist Amartya Sen to speak at Free Library of Philadelphia

Nobel Laureate in Economics and Princeton University Press author Amartya Sen will speak at the Free Public Library of Philadelphia on Thursday, April 24 (tomorrow). As part of the Sandra Shaber Memorial Lecture, Dr. Sen will address topics presented in his new book, An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions.

In this important book, Dr. Sen and co-author Jean Drèze argue that India’s main problems lie in the lack of attention paid to the essential needs of the people, especially of the poor, and often of women. There have been major failures both to foster participatory growth and to make good use of the public resources generated by economic growth to enhance people’s living conditions. There is also a continued inadequacy of social services such as schooling and medical care as well as of physical services such as safe water, electricity, drainage, transportation, and sanitation. The deep inequalities in Indian society tend to constrict public discussion, confining it largely to the lives and concerns of the relatively affluent. Sen and Drèze present a powerful analysis of these deprivations and inequalities as well as the possibility of change through democratic practice.

Hear more about Dr. Sen’s argument and findings by attending the lecture. Purchase your tickets here.

DETAILS

Amartya Sen | An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions
Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 7:30PM

Central Library

1901 Vine Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
(between 19th and 20th Streets on the Parkway)

(Cost: $15 General Admission, $7 Students)

k10175

Quick Questions for Rahul Sagar, author of Secrets and Leaks

rahul sagarRahul Sagar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. His primary research interests are in the field of political theory. He has written about a range of topics in ancient and modern political theory including executive power, moderation, tyranny, and political realism. We published his first book Secrets and Leaks: The Dilemma of State Secrecy last year. Reviewing the book in the New York Review of Books, David Cole said “Rahul Sagar’s Secrets and Leaks sheds important light on the question. In carefully argued and lucid prose, Sagar, a professor of politics at Princeton, argues that secrets are inevitable, as are leaks–and that leaks have an important if precarious part in checking secrecy abuse.”

Now, on to the questions!

Why did you write Secrets and Leaks?

I had an epiphany when I was writing my undergraduate dissertation at Oxford. The question I was examining at the time was whether India’s decision to test nuclear weapons was justified. As part of my field work I went to the Ministry of External Affairs to interview a senior bureaucrat. The bureaucrat held up a file—bound by a red band—and said to me, “everything you need to know is in here, but I can’t share it with you.” I came away from the meeting thinking to myself, if I can’t see what’s in that file, then no one else can, so how then does one conduct oversight? I ended up writing the dissertation on the conundrum that secrecy posed for democracy; I concluded that there was, in effect, no way for outsiders to know if India was justified in developing nuclear weapons. Shortly afterwards, I arrived at Harvard to do my PhD. I started three days before 9/11. Within weeks the Bush Administration’s ‘War on Terror’ was underway, and I realized there would be continuing interest in the topic, and that, curiously, very little had been written on it. And off I went, spurred on in particular by the fact that leaks played such an important role is revealing the contours of this secretive war.


If I can’t see what’s in that file then no one else can, so how then does one conduct oversight?


What is the book’s most important contribution?

I think its most important contribution is to draw attention to the limits of democracy. It is widely believed that the “problem” that secrecy poses—that secrecy may be used to cover up wrongdoing—can be “solved” through careful institutional design. Appoint a suitable committee or court to oversee the President, the argument goes, and you will lessen the risk of abuse. But this way of thinking does not make much sense—for what is to stop the members of this committee or court from disclosing information or keeping it secret as and when suits their interests?

The same conundrum appears when we rely on the press to oversee the President. The defenders of the First Amendment assume that the press will always act in the public interest. But reporters, editors, and publishers have interests of their own. Since they are able to keep their dealings with their sources confidential, how do we know that they are publishing classified information for the right reasons, i.e. not to bolster their sales?

What these conundrums reveal, I think, is that discretion is inevitable. Here we have reached the limits of what law and institutions can do. This in turn means that state secrets will be kept or disclosed for the right reasons only if ‘the Establishment’ is populated by men and women who are decent.

What was the most interesting thing you learned from writing Secrets and Leaks?

I learned about the value of time. In particular I learned how important it is to reflect on a question for a very long time. I rewrote the manuscript not once or twice, but three times. All said and done I spent nearly five years on the book. In part this was because I spent a lot of energy trying to make the text accessible. The more important reason for the prolonged writing period is that my views evolved—I became increasingly skeptical of those who depict state secrecy as evil and the press as the ‘champions’ of American democracy. In retrospect I am very glad I allowed my views to evolve. There was a great deal of hysteria about an ‘imperial Presidency’ in the wake of 9/11 and time gave me the chance to see this reaction as short sighted and self serving. It allowed me to write a book that I am truly satisfied with, and that I feel no need to revisit or revise for the foreseeable future.

Who do you see as the audience for this book?


I hope the book is read by government officials, both those who wish to keep secrets and those who wish to disclose them.


I wrote the book with a broad audience in mind. Obviously I wanted to make a theoretical contribution. I hope political theorists and students of American politics see the book as an exemplar of realist political theory—that is, theorizing that is attentive to the constraints that politics poses on democratic theory. But I never wanted to write a book solely for my discipline or indeed for scholars alone. I hope the book is read by government officials, both those who wish to keep secrets and those who wish to disclose them. I hope it tempers the actions of both sides. Above all I hope it is read by lawyers and journalists—the most powerful people in America! If a judge or two or a retired Vice-President happens to read it, I certainly won’t complain.

What are some of the books that have greatly influenced you?

Machiavelli’s Prince and Discourses, followed closely by Aristotle’s Politics, Montesquieu’s Persian Letters, Publius’ Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville’s Democracy in America. What these books have in common is that they are concerned with what I consider the most important question in political life, namely, what is the best possible regime that we can have.

What are you reading right now?

This week I’m reading Angus Deaton’s The Great Escape. I’ve assigned it for a class on politics and public policy where we are examining what can be done to help peoples that trapped in failed or failing states. The Great Escape provides a valuable counterpoint to scholars that call for military intervention and/or international aid. It identifies the smaller, concrete steps that can be taken to help peoples escape the impoverished circumstances that foster oppressive regimes.

What is your next project?

Thus far I have been interested in executive power in modern democracies. In particular I have studied what makes democratic leaders act responsibly even when their actions cannot be overseen by others. My next book project examines executive power in regimes that are not fully liberal or democratic. The great bulk of political regimes in the world fall into this category, yet contemporary scholars hardly study these regimes. My book project, tentatively titled Have You Been to Kazanistan?: The Case for Decent Regimes, evaluates what I term ‘decent regimes’—i.e. regimes that may not be fully liberal or democratic but do much to enhance the living standards of their citizens. What should we make of such regimes, I ask? Given that the Arab Spring has shown—once again—that it is difficult to “export” liberal democracy, I ask whether it would be more reasonable to coax regimes to be ‘decent’ than to goad their populaces to rebel—a policy that has led to the spread of ‘illiberal democracies’.

 


Don’t Beware of Math… Be Aware of It!

by Tim Chartier

[This article is cross posted from The Huffington Post]

As the last days of April unfold, we head into May and the end of the school year. Many classes focus on testing and final grades. Teachers often must focus and ready their students for end-of-the-year testing. Math classes will be asked problem after problem and question after question. In all those classrooms, a thought probably, if not often, races through someone’s mind. Yes, the thought… the one that makes pencils heavier, word problems harder and students wish they were somewhere, anywhere but where they are. There are a lot of ways that thought turns into a question. A common one: “Why study math?”

So let’s go and ask, particularly given that we are in April, which is Math Awareness Month. For some, math may be something to beware of rather than be aware of. In fact, that’s precisely the point of the month. Math has many applications, from theoretical to applied. Mathematicians continue to expand the boundaries of what we know mathematically. With the publication of each new issue of a journal, the field of math grows. NBA teams use mathematics to gain a competitive edge over their opponent. Will the better team with better mathematics win? It definitely helped the Oakland As in 2002 with the math that became known as Moneyball. Every day, credit card numbers are encrypted to allow for secure online transactions. Developing methods of encryption that simply cannot be broken with a faster computer comes from mathematics.

Studying math enables one to appreciate and possibly understand its applications. Yet one does not need to study math just so the techniques can be used in theoretical or applied settings. Mathematics teaches a way of thinking. Returning to basketball, mathematical formulas won’t pop off the court. Someone must derive them and study them to ensure their usefulness. It can take time to gain such insight.

The process toward such understanding is what probably draws many mathematicians to their field. I like to think of it as a path of wonder. For example, I’ve periodically been contacted by ESPN’s Sport Science program to aid in their analysis. They call when they are stuck. When the problem is first presented, my first thought is, “I have no idea how to do this.” And yes, every time I have found a way.

Part of this stems from my awareness of that path of mathematical wonder. You don’t have to simply know the answer to a math problem to solve it. In fact, math is usually more interesting when you don’t know how to solve a problem. Would a jigsaw puzzle be fun if it had only two or three pieces? You never know exactly how to fit a 1,000-piece puzzle together when you start, and you won’t always try to fit connecting pieces. It’s a puzzle, so you explore and experiment.

Math can be the same way. As such, there is a certain sense of mystery to math. You step into a question and simply stand in the unknown. Then you begin to explore, looking for pieces that fit together. This type of thinking is helpful for life, as it offers its unknowns. In life, you may be forced to stand in the unknown. What questions do you want to explore, and what pieces do you want to try to fit together?

Some math ideas are developed through a similar process of exploration. For example, about 10 years ago, I learned how Robert Bosch, Adrianne Herman and Craig Kaplan were creating pictures like the one that I made (after learning their ideas) below.

2014-04-20-gardnerTSP.png
 

The image above is a portrait of Martin Gardner, who we’ll return to momentarily. Later, it occurred to me that I could make mazes with these images if I used a math formula developed by Leonhard Euler, who lived in the 1700s. Seeing that I could fit these two ideas together — one about a decade old and another hundreds of years old — enabled me to create mazes for my book Math Bytes. Returning again to the NBA, here is such a maze:

2014-04-20-bBallMaze.png
Click here if you’d like a larger version of the maze.
 

This creative edge of math engages me. It makes teaching math every day at Davidson College a great job. And it makes answering that question “Why learn math?” a question I look forward to being asked.

But does this sound like the mathematics you know? If not, then you might want to spend some of these last days of April exploring the Mathematics Awareness Month website. The theme for April 2014 is Mathematics, Magic and Mystery. Each day of the month an engaging idea of mathematics has been unfolded. See the ones already shared and await those yet to come. Learn secrets of mental math, mathematics of juggling, optical illusions, and many more interesting ideas and the math behind them! Want to dig deeper? Note that the theme was chosen as 2014 marks what would have been the 100th birthday of Martin Gardner. Simply put, he engaged millions in his mathematical writing and made mathematicians and children alike aware of the wonders and mysteries of math.

So be aware of math! It has many applications, from magic to sports to the theoretical to the historical. I often tell my students in class that if you don’t like math, it may simply be that you haven’t discovered the area of math that fits the way you think! Be careful of sampling from only one part of the math buffet and walking away. A great place to sample many engaging ideas of math is every April with Math Awareness Month. This April, you can learn math and soon engage friends and family with ideas in the mystery and magic of mathematics!

So why study math? It develops your mathematical sense, which enables you to see life through that lens. In the process, you hone your ability to think in ways that can make you more aware of life itself. So enjoy these last days of April and be aware of math!

Follow Tim Chartier on Twitter: www.twitter.com/timchartier

Exclusive content from Princeton University Press

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