Archives for May 2013

BOOK FACT FRIDAY – The Federal Reserve & Ben S. Bernanke

k9928“The Federal Reserve was founded 1914, and concerns about both macroeconomic stability and financial stability motivated the decision of Congress and President Woodrow Wilson to create it. After the Civil War and into the early 1900s, there was no central bank, so any kind of financial stability functions that could not be performed by the Treasury had to be done privately.” -Ben S. Bernanke, from chapter one of The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis

In 2012, Ben Bernanke, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, gave a series of lectures about the Federal Reserve and the 2008 financial crisis, as part of a course at George Washington University on the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy. In this unusual event, Bernanke revealed important background and insights into the central bank’s crucial actions during the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. Taken directly from these historic talks, The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis offers insight into the guiding principles behind the Fed’s activities and the lessons to be learned from its handling of recent economic challenges.

Ben S. Bernanke is chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve. He has served as chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors and as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve. Before his time in public service he was a professor of economics at Princeton University. His many books include Essays on the Great Depression and Inflation Targeting (both Princeton).

The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis
by Ben S. Bernanke

We invite you to read chapter one online at: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s9928.pdf

40 years later, the Chagossians are still not home, writes David Vine

j9441[1]David Vine, author of Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia, writes about the continuing saga of the Chagossians at the Huffington Post. Deported to pave the way for a US military base on Diego Garcia, the Chagossians still endure poverty and homesickness or sagren. To learn more about the history and current activities of Diego Garcia, read this sample from from Vine’s book.

 

This month marks the fortieth anniversary of the final deportations, when the last boatload of Chagossians arrived 1,200 miles from their homes, on the western Indian Ocean islands of Mauritius and the Seychelles. In those same forty years, the base on British-controlled Diego Garcia helped launch the Afghan and Iraq wars and was part of the CIA’s secret “rendition” program for captured terrorist suspects.

The history of the base, which the U.S. military calls the “Footprint of Freedom,” dates to the 1950s and 1960s. By then, Chagossians had been living in the previously uninhabited Chagos islands for almost 200 years, since their ancestors arrived as enslaved Africans and indentured Indians. In 1965, after years of secret negotiations, Britain agreed to separate Chagos from colonial Mauritius (contravening UN decolonization rules) to create a new colony, the British Indian Ocean Territory. In a secret 1966 agreement, Britain gave U.S. officials base rights on Diego Garcia and agreed to take those “administrative measures” necessary to remove the nearly 2,000 Chagossians in exchange for $14 million in secret U.S. payments.

Beginning in 1968, any Chagossians who left Chagos for medical treatment or regular vacations in Mauritius were barred from returning home, marooning them often without family members and almost all their possessions. British officials soon began restricting food and medical supplies to Chagos. Anglo-American officials designed a public relations plan aimed at, as one British bureaucrat said, “maintaining the fiction” that Chagossians were migrant laborers rather than a people with roots in Chagos for five generations or more. Another British official called them “Tarzans” and “Man Fridays.”

In 1971, the U.S. Navy’s highest-ranking admiral, Elmo Zumwalt, issued the final deportation order in a three-word memo ringing of Joseph Conrad’s Kurtz:

“Absolutely must go.”

 

Read more at the Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-vine/forty-years-of-heartbreak_b_3344190.html

Climate Dynamics

Cook_Climate_Dynamics “Climate change and its impacts are being embraced by a wider community than just earth scientists. A useful textbook, Climate Dynamics covers the basic science required to gain insights into what constitutes the climate system and how it behaves. While still being quantitative, the material is written in a lecture-note style that creates a simplified, but not simple, approach to teaching this complex subject.”–Chris E. Forest, Pennsylvania State University

Climate Dynamics
Kerry H. Cook

Climate Dynamics is an advanced undergraduate-level textbook that provides an essential foundation in the physical understanding of the earth’s climate system. The book assumes no background in atmospheric or ocean sciences and is appropriate for any science or engineering student who has completed two semesters of calculus and one semester of calculus-based physics.

  • Makes a physically based, quantitative understanding of climate change accessible to all science, engineering, and mathematics undergraduates
  • Explains how the climate system works and why the climate is changing
  • Reinforces, applies, and connects the basic ideas of calculus and physics
  • Emphasizes fundamental observations and understanding

Endorsements

Table of Contents

Sample this book:

Chapter 1 [PDF]

Request an examination copy.

 

Find Us at BookExpo – Booth 1751

F13CvsThe exhibit doors open today in New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Center for BookExpo America – the book industry’s main event in North America. You will find Princeton University Press exhibiting books at booth #1751. Stop by to say hello, make new friends and find something good to read. Be sure to pick up our new Fall 2013 Seasonal Catalog, or download it directly to your device at http://press.princeton.edu/catalogs/F13Seasonal.pdf. Learn more about new books from our authors including; Angus Deaton, David Runciman, Robert Bartlett, Edmund Phelps, Alexander McCall Smith, Merry White, Alan Jacobs, and Martin Gardner – just to name a few. The catalog is full of great books by great authors and we hope to see you there!

Good news for book lovers, the doors open to the public on Saturday, June 1st. Get your ticket from BookExpo.

Two for Tuesday – Political Bubbles and Champagne Bubbles

bubblesFrom financial and political bubbles to bubbles that tickle your senses, we have you covered with two books just published. We invite you to read their Introductions online.

Political Bubbles: Financial Crises and the Failure of American Democracy
by Nolan McCarty, Keith T. Poole & Howard Rosenthal

Behind every financial crisis lurks a “political bubble”–policy biases that foster market behaviors leading to financial instability. Rather than tilting against risky behavior, political bubbles–arising from a potent combination of beliefs, institutions, and interests–aid, abet, and amplify risk. Demonstrating how political bubbles helped create the real estate-generated financial bubble and the 2008 financial crisis, this book argues that similar government oversights in the aftermath of the crisis undermined Washington’s response to the “popped” financial bubble, and shows how such patterns have occurred repeatedly throughout US history. The first full accounting of how politics produces financial ruptures, Political Bubbles offers timely lessons that all sectors would do well to heed.

Nolan McCarty is the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Politics at Princeton University. Keith T. Poole is the Philip H. Alston Jr. Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Georgia. Howard Rosenthal is professor of politics at New York University and the Roger Williams Straus Professor of Social Sciences, Emeritus, at Princeton University.
Introduction online: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9934.pdf

Uncorked: The Science of Champagne (Revised Edition)
by Gérard Liger-Belair
With a new foreword by Hervé This

Bubbly may tickle the nose, but Uncorked tackles what the nose and the naked eye cannot–the spectacular science that gives champagne its charm and champagne drinkers immeasurable pleasure. Providing an unprecedented close-up view of the beauty in the bubbles, Gérard Liger-Belair presents images that look surprisingly like lovely flowers, geometric patterns, even galaxies as the bubbles rise through the glass and burst forth on the surface. He illustrates how bubbles form not on the glass itself but are “born” out of debris stuck on the glass wall, how they rise, and how they pop. Offering a colorful history of champagne, Liger-Belair tells us how it is made and he asks if global warming could spell champagne’s demise. In a brand new foreword, renowned chemist Hervé This places the evolution of champagne within the context of molecular gastronomy and the science of cuisine, and in an original afterword, Liger-Belair updates the reader on new developments in the world of bubble science and delves even more deeply into the processes that give champagne its unique and beautiful character.

Gérard Liger-Belair is a physics professor at the University of Reims, located in the Champagne region of France.
Introduction online: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9939.pdf

Cybelle Fox is selected as a top five finalist in the 2012 C. Wright Mills Award competition for her work in Three Worlds of Relief

Three Worlds of Relief: Race, Immigration, and the American Welfare State from the Progressive Era to the New Deal
is Cybelle Fox’s publication that has earned her a slot as one of five finalists in this year’s award candidacy. The Society for the Study of Social Problems reviewed 67 nominated books to select the top five authors eligible for this award. Each year, members of the Society are encouraged to submit letters of nomination for this prestigious annual award. Self nominations are acceptable.Edited volumes, textbooks, fiction and self-published works are not eligible.The C. Wright Mills Award, established in 1964, is made annually and carries with it a stipend of $500 for the author(s) of the winning book. 
The 2012 award will be presented at the 62nd Annual Meeting in New York City, NY, on Saturday, August 10 at the awards ceremony.

Criteria:

(http://www.sssp1.org/index.cfm/m/548/2012_C_Wright_Mills_Award_Finalists/)

In order for Fox to be considered for the award, she had to meet the requirements for the award to an “outstanding degree,” according to The Society for the Study of Social Problems’ criteria listed on the site:

  1. Critically addresses an issue of contemporary public importance.
  2. Brings to the topic a fresh, imaginative perspective.
  3. Advances social scientific understanding of the topic.
  4. Displays a theoretically informed view and empirical orientation.
  5. Evinces quality in style of writing. Explicitly or implicitly contains implications for courses of action.
  6. Explicitly or implicitly contains implications for courses of action


Learn more about the The Society for the Study of Social Problems here
:

http://sssp1.org/index.cfm/m/20/About_SSSP/

BOOK LAUNCH (June 10, 6:30 PM): Join Derek Sayer, Michael Beckerman, Jindřich Toman, and Peter Zusi for a discussion on Prague – the dark capital of the twentieth century

Derek Sayer‘s book Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History, will be released June 10, 2013 at 6:30 PM in The Masaryk Room at University College London. Dialogue with Sayer, Michael Beckerman (New York University), Jindrich Toman (University of Michigan Ann-Arbor), and Peter Zusi (University College London) celebrates the release of the book. Conversation will center around topics that stem from the controversial history of the Czech Republic’s capital and largest city.

Sayer has received praise for his analysis of Prague’s history, bringing to life not only the art and design of the city, but also a vivid account of Prague’s entire cultural background:

This is a fascinating and brilliantly written narrative that combines elements of literary guide, biography, cultural history, and essay. Writing with warm engagement, and drawing on his detailed knowledge of Czech literature, art, architecture, music, and other fields, Derek Sayer provides a rich picture of a dynamic cultural landscape.“–Jindrich Toman, University of Michigan

[A] captivating portrait of 20th-century Prague. . . . The breadth of Sayer’s knowledge is encyclopedic, and those willing to stay the course will be rewarded.“–Publishers Weekly

Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century is an erudite, comprehensive, well-illustrated and witty account of Czech art, design, architecture, literature and music in an era–stretching roughly from Czechoslovakia’s creation in 1918 to the end of the second world war–when few in Paris, Berlin, London or even New York would have thought of the Czechs as not being part of western civilisation. . . . [I]n this book [Sayer] has succeeded in bringing back to life a golden avant-garde era that not long ago was in danger of being written out of history altogether.“–Tony Barber, Financial Times

EVENT INFO:
Book launch and conversation: Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century?

Setting out to recover the dreamworlds of modernity in the boulevards, interiors, and arcades of the “city of light,” Walter Benjamin dubbed Paris “the capital of the nineteenth century.” With Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History (Princeton University Press) Derek Sayer christens a new global capital for a darker century. Michael Beckerman, Jindřich Toman, and Peter Zusi join him in conversation to celebrate the publication of the book.

A Conversation

Michael Beckerman (New York University)
Jindrich Toman (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor)
Derek Sayer (Lancaster University)
Peter Zusi (University College London)

All welcome – this event is free, no registration needed.
More info: p.zusi@ucl.ac.uk

Venue:

The Masaryk Room, 4th Floor, The School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London, 16 Taviton Street, London WC1H 0BW

Date:

10 Jun 2013 18:30

Organizer:

Czech Center is a co-organizer of the event.

For more information on this event, please visit the following page:
http://london.czechcentres.cz/programme/travel-events/derek-sayer-book-launch/

How to Use The Warbler Guide‘s Maps

Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle have created the most innovative and complete guide to warblers available in The Warbler Guide. Maps sometimes seem like an afterthought in bird guides, but as this video makes clear, Scott and Tom have taken care to make the maps as useful as possible by highlighting seasonal differences in ranges and migratory paths.

Click here to learn more about The Warbler Guide. The book will be available July 2013.
For more tips on how to use The Warbler Guide and how to identify warblers in the field, please see additional videos in this series.

Two for Tuesday – Kafka

Kafka-series-covers.inddIntroducing Reiner Stach’s acclaimed and definitive biography of Franz Kafka from Princeton University Press. Franz Kafka (1883-1924) was an influential writer of the 20th century and Reiner Stach spent more than a decade working with over four thousand pages of journals, letters, and literary fragments, many never before available, to re-create the atmosphere in which Kafka lived and worked. This impressive biography was translated by Shelley Frisch. We invite you to read the sample chapters linked below.

Kafka: The Decisive Years
This period from 1910-1915, which would prove crucial to Kafka’s writing and set the course for the rest of his life, saw him working with astonishing intensity on his most seminal writings–The Trial, The Metamorphosis, The Man Who Disappeared (Amerika), and The Judgment. These are also the years of Kafka’s fascination with Zionism; of his tumultuous engagement to Felice Bauer; and of the outbreak of World War I. It is at once an extraordinary portrait of the writer and a startlingly original contribution to the art of literary biography.

We invite you to read the Introduction online:
http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9994.pdf

Kafka: The Years of Insight
This volume tells the story of the final years of the writer’s life, from 1916 to 1924–a period during which the world Kafka had known came to an end. Stach’s riveting narrative, which reflects the latest findings about Kafka’s life and works, draws readers in with a nearly cinematic power, zooming in for extreme close-ups of Kafka’s personal life, then pulling back for panoramic shots of a wider world scarred by World War I, disease, and inflation.

In these years, Kafka was spared military service at the front, yet his work as a civil servant brought him into chilling proximity with its grim realities. He was witness to unspeakable misery, lost the financial security he had been counting on to lead the life of a writer, and remained captive for years in his hometown of Prague. The outbreak of tuberculosis and the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire constituted a double shock for Kafka, and made him agonizingly aware of his increasing rootlessness. He began to pose broader existential questions, and his writing grew terser and more reflective, from the parable-like Country Doctor stories and A Hunger Artist to The Castle.

A door seemed to open in the form of a passionate relationship with the Czech journalist Milena Jesenská. But the romance was unfulfilled and Kafka, an incurably ill German Jew with a Czech passport, continued to suffer. However, his predicament only sharpened his perceptiveness, and the final period of his life became the years of insight.

We invite you to read the Prologue online:
http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s9943.pdf

The first volume, covering Kafka’s childhood and youth, is forthcoming.

Leonard Barkan to speak at Arts Week at Birkbeck, University of London, May 23, 6:00 PM

k9832[1]Birkbeck, University of London will host their annual Art Week next week. Leonard Barkan, author of Mute Poetry, Speaking Pictures and Michelangelo: A Life on Paper, will speak on May 23 at 6:00 PM.

Barkan’s book has received some lovely reviews from The Washington Post, Leonardo online, and Choice magazine (“…deserves to become a standard work on the relations of word, image, and poetry and painting in pre-modern culture…”) in recent months. We hope you can join him for what is bound to be a fascinating discussion of the peculiar relationship between art and poetry — or as Leonardo reviewer Jan Baetens puts it, “the desire to compare apples and oranges, and the skepticism that arises when apples and oranges are put aside in different baskets.”

Mute Poetry, Speaking Pictures: A book and some afterthoughts

May 23, 2013 06:00 – 07:30 PM
Venue The Peltz Room, 43 Gordon Square
Free entry; booking required

Event description

Professor Barkan (University of Princeton) will discuss his recent work on the relationship between words and pictures from antiquity to the Renaissance. Professor Barkan is the author of The Gods Made Flesh, Unearthing the Past and most recently Mute Poetry, Speaking Pictures.

Booking: This event is free but booking is essential – see http://bbkmutepoetry.eventbrite.com/

This event forms part of Arts Week 2013 – you can see the full programme here.

T J Clark at Bristol Festival of Ideas This Weekend

Clark author photo

T J Clark’s Picasso and Truth offers a breathtaking and original new look at the most significant artist of the modern era. This Saturday evening, T J Clark will be speaking about this important painter and his new book at a Bristol Festival of Ideas event.

Please click here if you would like to find out more about this event.

T J Clark will also be speaking at:

The London Review Bookshop on 28th May (sold out)

Hay Festival on 30th May

Birkbeck, University of London on 7th June (free entry)

and the London Lit Weekend on 5th October (stay tuned for more information)

Mulgan at the RSA: “I was struck that our debate had lost the capacity to ask how capitalism might evolve into something different”

In case you missed it, Geoff Mulgan, author of the recently published The Locust and the Bee, gave a truly excellent talk at the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufacturers and Commerce (RSA) back in March and it has just been made available online!

You can also listen to a podcast of the full event including audience Q&A here.