Archives for October 2012

Safari Time: Y is for Yellow Stork


 

This post is part of a Safari Series to celebrate the publication of Birds of Masai Mara by Adam Scott Kennedy and Animals of Masai Mara by Adam Scott Kennedy and Vicki Kennedy.

Check out additional Safari photographs of birds and animals here.

Animals of the Masai Mara
Adam Scott Kennedy & Vicki Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara
Adam Scott Kennedy

Take Flight with The Crossley ID Guide: California Condors in flight

Click on the photo above to view an even larger image.

 

A plate depicting California Condors in flight from The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors by Richard Crossley, Jerry Liguori and Brian L. Sullivan.

Condors are extremely slow moving and steady in flight, soaring in wider circles than other raptors. They soar with a slight dihedral, but sometimes appear flat-winged in light winds, with the wingtips always showing an obviously splayed, “fingered” appearance. Condors are frequently seen in pairs or small groups, often in the company of Turkey Vultures. Condors’ wingbeats are exceedingly slow and heavy, but once airborne they rarely flap.

Almost all Condors have numbered patagial markers that identify them as individuals. Can anyone positively ID the bird shown in flight here with his tags displayed? Leave a comment below with our model’s details.

To see ALL the sample plates from The Crossley ID Guide, click here.

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Safari Time: X is for Sunbird (editor’s choice as there are no Xes to choose from)

 

This post is part of a Safari Series to celebrate the publication of Birds of Masai Mara by Adam Scott Kennedy and Animals of Masai Mara by Adam Scott Kennedy and Vicki Kennedy.

Check out additional Safari photographs of birds and animals here.

Animals of the Masai Mara
Adam Scott Kennedy & Vicki Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara
Adam Scott Kennedy

Answer to turkey vultures and Swainson’s hawks question

A few days ago, we posted a sample plate from The Crossley ID Guide: Raptors depicting a kettle of Broad-winged Hawks. As the authors note, there are often a few turkey vultures or Swainson’s hawks mixed into these groups of soaring birds. We challenged readers to tell us how many vultures and Swainson’s hawks they could count in this picture:

According to the authors, there are actually 12 Turkey Vultures and 1 Swainson’s Hawk (top right). Did you find them all?

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Quintessential — Change

In this fifth of five videos, mathematics professor Michael Starbird talks about the fifth element in his new book, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking (@5Thinking), co-authored with Williams College professor Edward B. Burger.

 

Watch the previous video in this series:

Water: Enter the Flow of Ideas

 

 

 

bookjacket

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking
Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird

“I remember as a kid in school being told by teachers to think harder and having no idea what to do. This book solves that once and for all. We now have a guide for people of all ages to learn how to think more effectively. I highly recommend this book.”–Jack Canfield, cocreator of the New York Times best-selling Chicken Soup for the Soul® series and The Success Principles

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking is the kind of book I know would have helped me a lot in my days as a student. I’d like to think it will be helpful to students of today, too.”–Brian L. Belen, Brain Drain blog

BOOK FACT FRIDAY

FACT: “There are more than half a million known asteroids in the region between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter and several thousand known near-Earth objects of various sizes in the Earth’s neighborhood. These numbers are rapidly growing as more and more of them are discovered. Currently, more than three thousand asteroids a month are being discovered and dozens of these monthly discoveries are in the near-Earth object population.”

Near-Earth Objects:
Finding Them Before They Find Us

by Donald K. Yeomans

Of all the natural disasters that could befall us, only an Earth impact by a large comet or asteroid has the potential to end civilization in a single blow. Yet these near-Earth objects also offer tantalizing clues to our solar system’s origins, and someday could even serve as stepping-stones for space exploration. In this book, Donald Yeomans introduces readers to the science of near-Earth objects–its history, applications, and ongoing quest to find near-Earth objects before they find us.

We invite you to read chapter one:
http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s9817.pdf

Water — Enter the Flow of Ideas

In this fourth of five videos, mathematics professor Michael Starbird talks about the fourth element in his new book, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking (@5Thinking), co-authored with Williams College professor Edward B. Burger.

 

Watch the previous video in this series:

Air: Raise Questions

 

Watch the next video in this series:

Quintessential: Change

 

bookjacket

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking
Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird

“I remember as a kid in school being told by teachers to think harder and having no idea what to do. This book solves that once and for all. We now have a guide for people of all ages to learn how to think more effectively. I highly recommend this book.”–Jack Canfield, cocreator of the New York Times best-selling Chicken Soup for the Soul® series and The Success Principles

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking is the kind of book I know would have helped me a lot in my days as a student. I’d like to think it will be helpful to students of today, too.”–Brian L. Belen, Brain Drain blog

In Memoriam Jacques Barzun

Today, we join the world in mourning the loss of Jacques Barzun, one of the towering giants of intellectual life of the last century. We had the pleasure of publishing his Mellon lectures, The Use and Abuse of Art, a seminal work in art criticism. The New York Times does a wonderful job of celebrating his contributions and life, writing, in part:

Mr. Barzun stood beside Sidney Hook, Daniel Bell and Lionel Trilling as among the mid-20th century’s most wide-ranging scholars, all of whom tried to reconcile the achievements of European culture and philosophy with the demands and tastes of American intellectual and cultural life.

He wrote dozens of books across many decades, demonstrating that old age did not necessarily mean intellectual decline. He published his most ambitious and encyclopedic book at the age of 92 (and credited his productivity in part to chronic insomnia). That work, “From Dawn to Decadence,” is an 877-page survey of 500 years of Western culture in which he argued that Western civilization itself had entered a period of decline.

Mr. Barzun was both of the academy and the public square, a man of letters and — he was proud to say — of the people. In books and in the classroom he championed Romantic literature, 19th-century music and the Western literary canon. He helped design the influential “great books” curriculum at Columbia, where he was one of its most admired figures for half a century, serving as provost, dean of faculty and university professor.

A spectacular plate from The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds

 

Click here to view an even larger version of this image.

Why the Robin? There were no fewer than 24 of them feeding in my front yard this morning. They seem to be everywhere now that the weather is getting colder and our lawn makes for easier feedings. Also, I happen to think they are beautiful and have good personalities (for birds that is).

 

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The Crossley ID Guide
Eastern Birds
Richard Crossley

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How many university press authors would do this? Ai Weiwei rocks Gangnam style moves in new video.

 

“The Internet is uncontrollable. And if the Internet is uncontrollable, freedom will win. It’s as simple as that.”

–Ai Weiwei, “China’s censorship can never defeat the internet,” The Guardian, April 15, 2012

 

Gangnam style has been taking over the world in recent weeks so it isn’t too surprising that it’s finally filtered into the university press world. The gauntlet has now been thrown down in this delightful homage to pop culture by Ai Weiwei and friends. Who among our authors can top it?

We are going to have a lot of fun publishing Weiwei-isms by Ai Weiwei in a few weeks. To read up on the book, which was a late addition to our fall 2012 catalog, please click through the book’s page.

 

bookjacket

Weiwei-isms

Ai Weiwei

Edited by Larry Warsh

Safari Time: W is for White-bellied Hedgehog

 

This post is part of a Safari Series to celebrate the publication of Birds of Masai Mara by Adam Scott Kennedy and Animals of Masai Mara by Adam Scott Kennedy and Vicki Kennedy.

Check out additional Safari photographs of birds and animals here.

Animals of the Masai Mara
Adam Scott Kennedy & Vicki Kennedy

Birds of the Masai Mara
Adam Scott Kennedy

Air — Raise Questions

In this third of five videos, mathematics professor Michael Starbird talks about the third element in his new book, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking (@5Thinking), co-authored with Williams College professor Edward B. Burger.

 

Watch the previous video in this series:

Fire: Make Mistakes

 

Watch the next video in this series:

Water: Enter the Flow of Ideas

 

 

 

bookjacket

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking
Edward B. Burger & Michael Starbird

“I remember as a kid in school being told by teachers to think harder and having no idea what to do. This book solves that once and for all. We now have a guide for people of all ages to learn how to think more effectively. I highly recommend this book.”–Jack Canfield, cocreator of the New York Times best-selling Chicken Soup for the Soul® series and The Success Principles

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking is the kind of book I know would have helped me a lot in my days as a student. I’d like to think it will be helpful to students of today, too.”–Brian L. Belen, Brain Drain blog