The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking Giveaway on Goodreads

How would you like to win a copy of The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger and Michael Starbird? We have a great giveaway happening on Goodreads! Between now and September 14th you can enter to win a free copy of this inspiring book with just the simple click of a button. If you already have a Goodreads account, just click the “Enter to Win” button on our giveaway listing. If you’re not a Goodreads user, you can sign up for a free account here.

The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking presents practical and lively ways for you to become more successful through better thinking. The idea is simple: You can learn how to think far better by adopting specific strategies. Brilliant people aren’t a special breed—they just use their minds differently. By using the straightforward and thought-provoking techniques in The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking, you will regularly find imaginative solutions to difficult challenges, and you will discover new ways of looking at your world and yourself—revealing previously hidden opportunities.

If you’ve already read The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking, we’d love to hear from you. You can rate and review the book on the 5 Elements book page on Goodreads.

For more information on The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking, please visit http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9810.html. Be sure to check out our Q&A with the authors, some great videos with coauthor Edward Burger, and read the Introduction online.

Don’t forget—you have until September 14th to enter the Goodreads giveaway. Full details are here. Good luck!

Comments

  1. This is good to know that by using the straightforward and thought-provoking techniques in The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking we will regularly find imaginative solutions to difficult challenges.

  2. Consider me entered. If there is one thing I need to be doing more of, it’s thinking effectively

  3. I just entered the giveaway and look forward to reading the book. I always enjoy learning more about new ways to alter your mindset and look through different challenges through a new set of glasses. It seems like it could be a good complement to a book I just finished called Talent is Overrated, which focuses on how deliberate practice over many years can help average people achieve greatness.