PGS Daily Dinosaur – Coelophysis bauri

We’ve now dazzled you with colorful dinosaurs for two days, but Gregory Paul’s skeletal illustrations are no less stunning. Scroll down to view Coelophysis bauri in four different ways. The top is gracile, the middle is robust, and the bottom is a half-grown juvenile. This level of detail is possible because there are hundreds of fossils available making this dinosaur’s skeletal structure almost completely known.

This image is taken from The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs by Gregory S. Paul. It may not be reproduced elsewhere without permission.

Coelophysis bauri
3 m (10 ft) TL, 25 kg (50 lb)
FOSSIL REMAINS Hundreds of skulls and skeletons, many complete, juvenile to adult, completely known.
ANATOMICAL CHARACTERISTICS Very lightly built and gracile, overall very long bodied. Head long and shallow,
bite not powerful, crests absent, teeth numerous and small. Neck long and slender.
AGE Late Triassic, Late Norian or Rhaetian.
DISTRIBUTION AND FORMATION New Mexico; probably upper Chinle.
HABITS Predominantly small game hunter but may have occasionally attacked larger prosauropods and herbivorous thecodonts.
NOTES The classic early avepod theropod. In accord with a decision of the committee that handles taxonomic issues, the specimen that the taxon is based on was shifted from inadequate fossils in the Chinle to a complete specimen from the famous Ghost Ranch Quarry. How hundreds of skeletons came to be concentrated in the quarry remains unsettled.

Comments

  1. Researchers Identify Fossil of Dinosaur-Eating Snake – NYTimes.com

    A snake eyeing an egg for its diet is something normal, that we see on channels like discovery and National Geographic, but here, the situation is totally different. as the snake was 67 million years old — providing us tons of information with new insight about how snakes during the dinosaur era lived on, and apparently as it appears snakes used to eat Dinosaur’s eggs.

    Check the full story here:

    http://www.icweb.org/story.php?title=researchers-identify-fossil-of-dinosaur-eating-snake-nytimes-com-1

Trackbacks

  1. […] accompanying text tells you. So, in order of decreasing evolutionary distance from modern birds: Coelophysis, Allosaurus (note the disappearance of the fourth finger and the changing proportions of the […]

  2. […] Originally Posted by me So, in order of decreasing evolutionary distance from modern birds: Coelophysis, Allosaurus (note the disappearance of the fourth finger and the changing proportions of the […]